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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I think this question is more important than how often a bullet fails to expand.

A while back I was charged by two attack dogs. I assumed a Weaver type stance and let loose.

I did everything right, or it seems, when just looking at the shooting itself. But, I scored no hits.

What I did right:

I drew quickly and easily from concealment and fired, counting my shots. I experienced auditory exclusion - I heard the first shot dimly but the second two didn't even register. I stopped firing when the dogs turned tail.

What I did wrong:

I wasn't expecting trouble. I heard my dogs barking and went out to check on them. I got between the travel trailer and the house, about a foot on either side of me. I WAS STANDING ON ICE as well with one of my dogs behind me, keeping me from backing up.

When the dogs charged I slapped leather and began firing. I did see the front sight... but it wasn't aligning swiftly enough. Ever see a dog charge you? Low, and very fast. As soon as I got a bead on one it'd be gone. I couldn't move fast enough to lead them.

I've since incorporated low, fast targets into my training. I'm sure if it had been a two legged animal its chest would have been so much hamburger, but as it was, I couldn't keep up.

That's a scenario I hadn't trained for. Satisfactory conclusion; the only thing that suffered were my ears and though I have a bit of hearing loss, I also have that gift where the bones in the ears seperate, so it wasn't as bad as it could have been. But I scored no hits.

So, from your angle, why do we miss?

Josh <><
 
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We miss because we can't take the time needed to make sure the shots land where intended. You just have to do the best you can in a second or two. Plus the target was moving, which makes it more difficult. In an ideal scenario, a shotgun with a wide spread would of been a good gun to fire at the dogs. But at least you got some shots off which scared the dogs away. Don't worry about hearing loss, if it makes you feel better I have hearing loss and I'm in my twenties. Mine isn't serious thankfully, I was just told by the Nurse who did the test to take care protecting my hearing. I guess it's something to be expected when you've been shooting since you were a kid. I do have a continuous ringing in my ears though :( Sometimes it goes sometimes it doesn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Abninftr,

I used to practice moving targets up until about six months ago when my shooting area aquired a new fence for my dogs. I have to move out a bit further now, but I've found a suitable spot.

I try to incorporate the moving targets (especially balloons on gusty days) whenever I'm out. I also use swinging targets.

I just never practice shooting that low before. The angle got me.

I'm postitive I'll be able to make the shot next time - if there is a next time, which I hope there won't be.

I started this thread in the hopes that people would take a looksee at their training and realize scenarios that they've never thought of. It's not soley about me; rather, I used myself as an example.

Thanks,

Josh <><
 
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I like the ballons on a windy day idea ...
can anyone offer more ways to train on unpredictably moving targets?
problem is I live in the city and few oppurtunities exist to shoot outside the range.
-p
 
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The Pit Bull Drill:

Tie a rope to the handle of a large plastic bottle (anything from a 1 gallon milk jug to a 2-3 gallon laundry detergent jug will do) Other similar size object may work as well

Lay bottle on ground at target line, rope extended back to behind the firing line. Have shooter stand with feet straddling the rope; vary distances between strings.

Have someone grab the rope, and on signal from the range master, pull the rope toward the shooter. The object is to get hits on the 'pit bull' (bottle) before it can bite you.

NOTE: This one can get real exciting, and it's really easy to get caught up in it, so if using live ammunition, having someone designated as Range Safety Officer is pretty much mandatory.

For obvious safety reasons, the Range Officer must make sure that the rope man STOPS pulling the rope before the 'pit bull' reaches the shooter's feet, and that the shooter does not pont the pistol at his/her feet, or turn around to keep trying to shoot the 'pit bull.' If the shooter really gets into the drill, and the 'pit bull' is pulled BETWEEN the shooter's feet, he/she may turn and start shooting UPRANGE.

This drill can be run with less risk using Airsoft guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mr. Shambaugh,

Thank you. That's a helpful drill.

I've been using things suspended from ropes from tree limbs, but the arc that it passes through just isn't as realistic.

I think as an added caution I will rig up a spring loaded or electric motor to pull the target, and set it to stop before reaching my feet.

Josh <><
 

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Thanks for sharing that Josh. It illustrates a very important point.

We do so much of our practice on stationary targets. Moving ourself is a good idea but it only covers half of the possibilities for movement.

A predictable moving target is better than nothing but it too has practical limitations.

I suspect Roger's drill, which I never tried but may have to rig up, might be less predictable than most runners. Sounds like a good thing to try.

I have tried hitting tennis balls on the bounce but - while challenging - I don't think it would replicate a charging animal like Rogers.

J.D. Knapp out in Kansas (Right place????) is known for making movers that bob and weave...that is really a good stuff!!!!

Of course the best is to go out every so often and provoke a wild boar into charging...but the learning curve can be expensive.... both in fees and Dr. Bills :)

Onward,
Jim
 
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Ever thought of "Buck Fever"? And a remote radio controled car will "pull" a balloon and it can be stopped well before it comes to close. Besides, different drills will make the practice more fun.
 
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