Handguns and Ammunition Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My girlfriend has never shot a handgun, before, and I want to teach her how. Should she start with a .22 revolver, or a .22 automatic? I know the revolver would be simpler, but it's not like selling a defense gun to someone in a gunstore who you have no idea whether or not knows how to use it; I'm fairly certain I could teach her the basics of an automatic. On the other hand, the autoloader wouldn't transition directly to a usable defensive arm. For instance, a S&W 617 is functionally Identical to a M19, except for caliber, but a Ruger MkII is a lot different than a Ruger P95.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,399 Posts
Hi chubbypidgeon,

I would agree that a double action .22 caliber revolver would make perfect "sense" as a first timers training firearm. Simplicity of operation and manual of arms make it a great training tool.

However, the caveat remains that if the .22 calibre is easy to master quickly, than I would move on up to the .38 Special. It would also be easier to go to a shooting range that rents a variety of handguns for her to try out and start with a .22.

Also, if she or you both decide to purchase a handgun after the initial and requisite teaching and learning of firearms safety, manual of arms and basic marksmanship, it will give her the opportunity to "try" a mixed variety of handgun types and calibers.

Chris
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ruger 22/45 to a 1911, Walther P22 to P99, Could allways buy a Hipower with a .22 top end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,617 Posts
I'm with Chris: rent first.

If she has no experience whatsoever there's no way to tell what design she'll 'click' with.

Besides design (and the resultant Manual-Of-Arms), there's weight, grip angle, grip thickness, balance, and a dozen other things that we can't know if it bothers her til she tries it. Peoples hands come in different sizes and joint mobility varies. Strength varies. Etc. Etc.

If you know someone with a varied collection who would bring a selection to the range to try out that would be even better. Cheaper and more importantly, less rushed.

It isn't just between revolver and auto as much as variations within that group.


My .02 only, of course.

Regards,

Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I also think a double action revolver is the best choice for a new shooter but Chris and Pat make some very valid points to should be given a lot of consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
This is not a flip answer but get both!

Not only will they be of use to you but it can easily demonstrate to the novice the basic differences between the two types of weapons.

I try to keep both a .22 DA revolver (usually a 4" Diamondback) and an atuo (usually a Colt Woodsman) in my range bag just in case a novice shooter wants to try one or both out.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I agree with most of what has been said, but there is one really important issue here that we tend to overlook. My wife and I are both teachers, and can tell you from experience that teaching someone you have a relationship with is asking for trouble. Find a good shooting school and give her a chance to learn without the extra pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,399 Posts
Hi hangfire,

Yes, that is a rather important point as I learned many years ago with my second wife.

I attempted to teach her at one point with limited success with a S&W 586 with .38 special loads at outdoor skeet club in NC with a pistol range. I taught her some fundamentals and she did pretty good! But, there were lot's of distractions.

She wanted to learn more a couple of years later and I enrolled her in handgun safety and shooting class at the local range taught by the owner who is a certified NRA instructor. She borrowed my SA Mil Spec for the class and "graduated" at the top of her class with the highest scores posted!

Lesson learned. The quality of instruction and practice in a "formal" classroom setting is much more effective than an hour of instruction in a open "hot" range. There are no distractions and the focus is on the student's individual learning skills. Also, the teaching and learning is a lot more structured and objectified focused on specific subjects, i.e. safety, sight alignment and trigger pull. Have you ever tried to explain sight alignment at a "hot" range with ear muffs on to someone else?

Oh and by the way, she picked the 1911 for its better grip and sights for her ergonomics/stature and not what I recommended.

I think I got it back eventually.....

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Chris: I learned (the hard way, of course) when my wife wanted to take up fly fishing. She put a lot of pressure on herself because she knew I was giving up fishing time to teach her. I was stressed because I wanted her to catch fish so she would understand the attraction. Fortunately we realized what was going on before she became my FIRST wife -- if you see what I mean! Professional instruction may seem costly, but it's cheaper in the long run. Since then Sherry has been to Alaska twice, Colorado, Montana...and now she doesn't ask me why I need a new rod. She asks me when hers is coming. I see no reason why this shouldn't work with guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,399 Posts
Hi hangfire,

Well, my friend, you are indeed blessed to have a mate that shares your passion for your advocations.

I certainly wish that I had a mate that shared the same passion for firearms. However, I am a happy to have one that understands my enjoyment of handgunning and the shooting sports!

Chris
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top