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Hello!

I'm still looking for a caliber for my future third revolver. We already discussed the .44 magnum (not for me!) and the .41 magnum (almost impossible to find in Switzerland)
 

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Mr. Jonas,

Hello again. I have no personal experience with the .17 HMR or .17HM2, so sorry I can not help you on those two.

I have never had any of the .32 rounds you mentioned, but I can at least answer that question for you.

I checked several reloading manuals on the .32 H&R magnum. They all agree that a .32 H&R mag weapon will safely handle both the .32 S&W and the .32 S&W Long cartridges also.

According to one reloading manual the .32 H&R mag was essentially a .32 S&W Long case lengthened to allow a new round at both higher pressure and velocity.

But it would be better if folks who have these and can confirm it with personal experiences give you some feedback too. I would not expect any serious accuracy problems using the smaller cartridges, but I would think it better if someone with first hand knowledge tells you it works too.

Take care,

twoguns
 
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The .17 rimfires and the .32 centerfires are very different cartridges with very different purposes.


The .17's are small varmint cartridges for, in a handgun, short (with open sights) to medium-range (with a 4-7X scope) small varmint shooting. For this purpose, the .17 HMR is much the superior cartridge. I have no experience with the .17 HM2 but in one article I read it didn't have the killing power on small ground squirrels that a hot .22 Long Rifle catridge did. Too small of a caliber and insufficient velocity to expand it, I think. And this was in a rifle.

They are too expensive for plinking.


I have several .32 H&R Magnums. A revolver cartridge with rather narrow applications, it does provide more flexibility.

It is a small game and varmint cartridge for small to medium-size varmints up to coyote size. (It will certainly kill coyotes, but it's marginal for this application and there are oh-so-many better options in revolvers.) It has also been somewhat popular as a personal defense cartridge in small-frame revolvers and, of late, the fly-weight revolvers by Smith&Wesson, as it's significantly less punishing as these revolvers tend to be even in .38 Special.

Ammo is fairly expensive, but you can shoot .32 Long ammo (the .32 Long is the parent cartridge of the .32 H&R Magnum, in the same way that the .38 Special is the parent cartridge of the .357 Magnum) and just about everybody but everybody that makes handgun ammo manufactures .32 Long ammo. In the post-war era the .32 Long has become a very popular target catridge for very sophisticated and expensive target autos for a class of target shooting popular in Europe. All of which means the cartridge is easily available and competition between manufacturers keeps the price pretty reasonable. You can also shoot the .32 S&W in the .32 H&R Magnum (bullet diameter is the same for all three cartridges), although I've never done it or heard of anybody doing it. .32 S&W ammo may not be significantly cheaper for you in Switzlerland than .32 Long, and the much shorter cartridge requires the bullet to jump quite a distance without guidance from the case mouth to the throat of the cylinder chambers, giving it quite an opportunity to get cock-eyed in the process and possibly giving you mediocre to poor accuracy. You will just have to try it and see. Also, shooting the short cartridge will leave lots of bullet lubricant and burned powder residue in the .32 H&R Magnum chamber that's not occupied by the short case of the .32 S&W cartridge, causing you difficulties in later using .32 H&R Magnum ammo again if you don't thoroughly scrub it out. Probably, unless it's a lot cheaper for you, shooting .32 S&W will be more trouble than it's worth.
 
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