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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a Spanish revolver that my Dad inherited. It is in questionable mechanical shape, it does not go into time without a nudge. ;) But I am curious what it is. My dad took it to a gun shop and they told him it was nothing, but I want to know what kind of nothing it is. ;) It is a .38 Special revolver.

It is the top gun in the picture here:






So?? What is it?

- Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
About all I can tell you is that it is indeed Spanish made, sometime after 1929 and was really meant for .38 Special smokeless ammo. Then. Not that I would shoot it now. It is not only in questionable mechanical condition, there is no question as to quality... not much. After all, the maker apparently did not even admit his name. A lot of these guns actually operate like a Colt even though, they are faked up to look like a Smith & Wesson. Value is low, parts for repairs not available anywhere I know of.
 

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Don't you love it when you take something to someone, and ask them a question, and rather than admit "I don't know," they give you a flippant answer like "It's nothing"? (Usually delivered with a down the nose, "How dare you ask ME such a stupid question" look.)

I don't know what it is either. What's the break top under it?
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks a lot for the info guys! The top-break revolver also as no identifying markings on it, and also is in questionable mechanical shape. It has an owl head on the grips. It is in .38 S&W. I figure both of them are wall-hangers, but I am just interested what they are.

- Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, I'm going to post this on the curio & relic board, so I'll let you know if I find anything there.

- Chris
 

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Could the top break revolver be an F&W?

No, not an S&W, but F&W. That stands for Forehand and Wadsworth, which made S&W copies for quite a while. I seem to remember that their symbol was some sort of animal.
 

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The 'owl-head' grips may be off of (or copied from) an Iver Johnson.

A lof of Spanish and Belgian copies of US revolvers were made at one time.

The reason for the 'Marcas Registradas' marking on Smiths was due to the Spanish trademark laws stating that if the notification of registered trademark wasn't given in spanish, they were free to copy them.

Friend had a copy of a S&W breaktop that the rollmark on the rib went as follows:

Smill & Welson, Springfeld, Muss

All the patent dates were the same, except one digit in each date was off by one. To a casual look (or someone who didn't read English) it appeared to be a Smith.


Regards,

Pat
 

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Hi there,

Could the top revolver pictured be a "Ortegas".

Saw one similiar in an SOG flyer. They were advertised as wallhangers and as C & R.

Just a WAG.

Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Both revolvers look like Spanish models made in the Eibar region by various manufacturers.
I have no record of an owl on the grips but these were common designs and many were made.
 
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