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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I think I've mentioned elsewhere that I'm training again. I got to feeling old, slow and fat, and something needed done.

This training involves throwing punches and kicks with weights, stretching exercises, etc. It's hard to practice locking and throwing without an opponent, but I'm trying to remedy that situation.

One thing that I'm doing that's a bit unorthodox perhaps is weapons transitions - not because I feel I'll ever need it, but because I do need the dry fire practice with the pistol, and throwing a 10 pound rifle is more fun than is lifting weights.

What I do is this: I load both weapons with empty shells. Then I check. Then I check again.

I aim at something on TV (since the pictures move) and dry fire the rifle. When I hear the click, my support arm bends to support the rifle at my elbow, my strong hand shoots down, and as my pistol comes onto target, the rifle is slung over my back and is held there by the sling, muzzle down.

I repeat this 10x on each side.

Ten pounds of rifle make this a challenge sometimes!

At any rate, other than fun exercise, what are your thoughts on this? I've debated that maybe it would be useful if one were armed with a .22 hunting rifle and ended up in a firefight with poachers, or some wild scenario such as this.

Again, I look at it merely as exercise, like I do with a sword, staff, spear or sticks. But can you think of any real world application for the private citizen?

Just got curious is all.

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Well, I don't know about a rifle but using one of the spring-action airsoft pistols would give you pretty of transition and malfunction clearing practice. You have to pull the slide back everytime to cock that pistol. At worst with it you might put a lttle dent in the wall with the 6mm plastic bb.
 

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Josh, you have WAAYY too much time on your hands.

I'll answer your question about a real world application for the private citizen. Off the top the top of my head, I can think of only one, and that would be if there was a break-in whilst home, i.e. home invasion robbery, and the homeowner's primary defensive weapon was a long arm - shotgun or rifle, and had a holstered handgun as a back-up. Then, his or her immediate action if the long didn't function would be to just simply drop the long to the side and go to the handgun.

Not high speed, not fancy, but it is do-able and realistic. It is what people did for decades before 'weapons transition' was a term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys.

Abninftr, no, I don't have enough time actually. I wake up at 3am or 4am to do this, get the smell off, drink breakfast (a homemade shake that's time proven to me), get dressed, and head to school or hit the books.

Yesterday I was up at 3am and in bed at 11pm. I have the day off today and so I slept in until 6am


Just whenever I do something, I think about whether it could be real-world applied somehow. Like when I practice with my sticks. Before I had a CCW permit I carried two extendable battons - perfectly legal here and highly effective in the right hands. I practiced with two wooden sticks.

I didn't think it had any real world applications, but hey, thought I'd check. That never hurt anyone, right? :)

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Howdy folks,

I basically agree with the view that this technique could be of value in a home protection scenario for civilians. But that is basically the only situation that readily comes to mind.

During one of my training courses I was taught to do a transition from long gun to pistol. We were taught to leave the long gun shouldered and held in place with the support hand. We drew our pistol strong handed, and immediately placed it along side of the long gun and began firing. The concept was to get rounds going back downrange as quickly as possible.

While it may sound excessive, with practice I have found it to be a very natural transition for me. You have to remember two points that readily come to mind with long guns, be they rifles or shotguns. Not everyone has a sling attached to their long gun. Even if they are holding one with a sling, not every situation allows the sling to be used too. Thinks may happen so quickly that you do not have time to utilize the sling before you are forced to being firing the long gun.

All of my long guns are slinged, and were in training as well. The idea here was the long arm may have malfunctioned or simply be out of ammo. I wanted to retain it while firing controlled, aimed rounds down range. When I was able to obain cover, at that point I could deal with trying to get the long gun back up and running.

Just something to consider.

twoguns
 
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