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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

This is a topic which I'm not sure applies to many others, but I doubt I can be the only one.

When I first got my carry pistol it shot waaay to the right. I found and corrected the problem- it was partially the way I was gripping it, partially me having to adjust to the sights, and partially the pistol- I had to drift the rear sight left a bit.

Now and again I'm struck with the certainty that it has gone back to shooting that far off at 25yds. Logically I know it hasn't, and logically I know that at typical SD ranges (ie <7yds) it probably wouldn't matter. The way I've always eased my mind was to shoot a soda can at 25yds from a rest, SA, no mistakes. That and regular training kept it down.

However, because of future family and business reasons, I'm stuck in town most of the time. I can't just go and make range time like I used to. I'm still proficient and will practice enough to remain so, but... that nagging uncertainty is still there! Dang...

Does anyone else ever start having this sort of weapon anxiety?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Um, in a word, no.

Why would properly attached fixed sights suddenly wonder?

I don't mean to sound sarcastic, but I'll give you the same advice I gave my wife about a totally unrelated matter. I'm sure there are some real worries worth the energy you expend worrying about something so remotely unlikely to happen.
 

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Do you worry about whether you turned your stove off? Or whether you've locked your car in the lot outside the movie theater?

If so, you might have some OCD issues.

But if it's just the gun, I can relate. Not necessarily with worrying about the sights, but I've certainly had guns that 1) did something hinky, 2) I then repaired, and 3) I never felt comfortable with afterward.

If it's really an issue specific to that gun (you didn't specify, so I can't really speculate as to whether the sights are liable to move on their own), you would certainly not be crazy to get a different one. Heaven knows I've done that a few times. :-/
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Erich,

I don't worry about much. I figure that if something happens then I'll deal with it.

It's just the pistol. When I got it seven years ago and was learning to shoot it I was also trying to figure out my grip and what worked and didn't for me.

The pistol was sliding in my hand upon firing. I replaced the wood presentation grips with rubber and added skateboard tape to the front. I also modified my hand positioning. The pistol still shot perhaps 1" to the right at 25yds so I drifted the rear sight a bit. No more problems and it holds sub-2" combat groups at 25yds now.

I came directly into pistols from .22 rifles that I would accurize myself. My expectations for that pistol were too high to begin with.

I've mentioned elsewhere that I'm restarting an old business. I don't have the ready finances but I am attempting to at least save for a 1911 as I found the exact configuration that fits my hands, and after that, a Hi Power. A CZ will come in someplace as well. After reliability testing I will figure out which one suits my needs best. Should the Taurus lose, it will be like parting with a friend...

But... this is the pistol that's stayed while others have come and gone. I've done my own "reliability package" to it and, while I used to get malfunctions with standard ammo, five per 100 or so, it's not bobbled in years.

I'm just one for surgical precision. I can't really explain it any better than that.
___

I guess the question that I was asking was really broader: If you carry one pistol, do you ever think about what would happen if you needed it and it didn't work due to pocket lint, damage, etc.?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Josh,
Firstly, I do carry one gun. I keep it clean and frequently check its function. I also have a couple of identically configured guns to use either alternately or if one is in the shop for a tune- up.
I don't really worry about my carry gun going south on me. Perhaps my life experience, ego, arrogance, leads me to believe in my skills, my preparedness, and my equipment.
No one is paying me to stand and fight these days, so given the option I'll beat a hasty retreat. If I don't have that alternative, then I'll deal with it with what I have.

As I alluded in a different thread, avoindaning a potential situation is much better than de-escalating or dealing with one.
 

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Hi Josh,

Oh yeah, I've had that kind of anxiety.

Back in the early 90's and while participating in a match, I was speedloading my 1911 and when I smacked the magazine home with the heal of my hand; the gun would not go back into action.

Down at my feet lay 8/.45 ACP rounds, the magazine base plate, the magazine spring and the follower and the body of the magazine was protruding up through and into the slide. As a consequence, I don't use this brand of XXX magazines anymore. The magazine was of a well known and highly respected manufacturer.

I believe the above case shows an example of exceptional, rather than normal failure, of a component of a firearm to do its part. However, if you apply reasonable care to your firearm, it will serve you well in any situation.

I am confident with the firearms that I carry and will not carry one until I am completely confident that it is utterly reliable. I recently removed the magazine disconnect in my HP clone and it did not function until I fixed a simple problem with the positioning of the trigger pin in the frame. Will I carry it? No and not until I am certain 100% that it will function all of the time and without any failures (and that includes components).

In my case and in my opinion, a carry firearm has to be utterly and unconditionally reliable for me "right out of the box". If not, it goes right back to the manufacturer for diagnosis and repair. If it is used or a "victim" of something I've done as a result of my "tinkering", than it goes to the gunsmith who absolutely loves customer's like me.


Chris
 
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I haven't shared your concern, but once in my younger and dumber days, I carried a pistol for a couple of weeks before I ever shot it, and when I shot it, it choked. I never did that again. I will not carry a handgun that I don't have complete confidence in, and I normally have two on me or a second one very close, like it the pickup console.
 

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I do find lint and crud in my Glock when I tear it down weekly (I wipe it down daily) to clean out - it's always worked at the range, though. I've stopped carrying other semiautos when I wasn't convinced that would be the case with them. I trust the Glock, for some reason.

And, on those weird instances when I just feel hinky about a gun because of some range performance issue, I just carry revos until I can get back to the range and assure myself that the problem is fixed.
 

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Hello Josh,

I understand where you are coming from, I'm the type person that worries about everything, and I do believe that Murphy is very much alive & well, he spends too much time over at my place for me to feel any differntly.

I'm too old to change now, plus I think it gives us worrier's an edge, I have done alot of traveling abroad, and a couple of things that I had worried about, DID happen... I'm real glad that I had envisioned them, it took alittle of the edge off, and gave me an edge because I had already thought it out before hand.

I also worrie about my guns all the time... even thow they are well cared for, Stuff Happens!

Take Care,
THE SOCKMAN
 

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When I saw the thread I imagined something else. I can get pretty anxious about malfunctions in a serious carry gun. My Glock 23 malfunctioned with good ammo about 4 times in the first 2500 rounds and for that reason it is still on probation (some 8 years later!) - but two of those were with other folks shooting it so I have not totally abandoned it. I also had a good friend at Glock replace the recoil spring and put in a NY trigger return spring which he claims is more reliable than the normal spring (one of my malfunctions was the trigger locked back and would not come forward until I stripped the gun).

However, I ran into an odd case that relates to what Josh mentioned. Way back when one of our big cities still carried revolvers one of my students was on the SWAT team and they purchased the then new Beretta 92S for them. He said his gun was shooting to the right and he was afraid to move the sight because the slide looked to fragile. I said, OK I would look at it.

Before doing any moving I shot the gun and said that's odd we shoot alike but I am shooting to the left. He picked the gun up and he shot left then also. I took it again and suddenly I hit to the right.

We finally figured out it was just in how we were holding the gun and pressing the trigger...any combination of wrong grip or less than straight back pressure on the trigger seemed to make the gun shoot off.

He gave up and the SWAT team never really carried the gun anyway as they had regular duties and the chief wanted them to carry their .38 revolver for regular uniformed work...they figured that having to learn two handguns was pretty bad practice so they dumped the Berettas.

Later I found a real tendency to shoot to the left (I am right handed) with the M9 (I really don't know why I shot one group to the right that day). It has to do with the round profile of the griprame and trigger overtravel.

If I install Hogue rubber stocks and a Langdon Trigger with the stop on the back that tendency disappears - I don't do that since I need to teach with a relatively stock gun but were I to have to depend on the M9 I certainly would, in addition to installing a 1911 mainspring.

Onward,
Jim
 

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Jim, the Beretta 92 and the comparable Taurus have large grips. As instructors, we know that too large of a grip for an individual's hands will cause this sort of inaccuracy. It's because, although they think and feel that they are acquiring the grip the same way each time, it really is a different hand/gun interface for them each time.
 

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abninftr; Bingo!

But that overtravel thing cannot be overstated, I cannot dry fire an M9 without seeing the sight flip to the left unless I put extraordinary pressure on with my weak hand (more than the customary 60%).

Jim
 
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Gents,

I tend to be pretty terse, at times. This is one of them.

Anxiety it caused by stress/worry. If you are not comfortable with your level of training, carry weapon(s) or any accoutrements you need to take corrective action immediately.

The last thing you want when things go south is wondering "if this will work" or not.

Wes

Sometimes the instructor, always the student".
 
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