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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Years ago when I was in law school, I bought a Chinese Norinco Type 213 Tokarev. This was the one made with the smaller gripframe, designed especially for the 9x19 cartridge. I didn't need the gun, but at around $100, it was too good to pass up (I traded a used Beretta 950 BS .25 straight across for it - I had two of those). I wound up using it a fair amount, as a car gun. I lived in a pretty bad area at the time, and I'd take it out of my car and bring it up to my well-secured apartment every night. I loaded it with IMI's UZI-brand black-tip carbine rounds - I recall that these 115-gr FMJs chrono'd in the mid-1200 fps range from the Tok.

The gun was fun to shoot. It wasn't super-accurate, had a creepy trigger, but it worked and worked and worked. In my many dealings with the shady side of life at the time (I was working as a private investigator for a criminal defense attorney at the time, and I was - as I mentioned - living in a bad part of town), I had occasion to bring the gun into sight at least three times that I can quickly recall - and I actually racked a bullet into the chamber and aimed it on one of them. As I said, it worked, worked, worked, and I relied on it (NM at the time had no legal way to CCW, so I often found myself falling back on the decent-sized and -calibered car gun instead of a carry gun when things got weird).

Anyway, after a time I was a lawyer and I was moving to a different town and a friend asked to buy the Tokarev. I sold it to him for cheap, but I missed it soon afterward. Something about the way the skinny thing felt. When I eventually asked my friend if I could buy it back, he told me that his crazy mother had been visiting, and he had destroyed the gun
out of fear that she would hurt herself or someone else with it (Dude! Why not just leave it at the office! ???)

Well, years later when I was at the tail end of my milsurp madness, I saw that SOG was importing Polish Tokarevs. The Circle-11 mark confirmed that these were made at the famous Radom factory - anyone familiar with Polish weapons knows that they're are of top-notch quality (the P-64 possibly excluded - jury's still out on that). I missed the slender bastard child of John Moses Browning, and snagged one for $129. Here are some pictures.





It came with a goofy import-rules-required safety, of course, but a better-designed on than that on the Chinese Toks I'd seen. The Chinese (and some Russkis) Tokarevs put a crude safety on the frame to the rear of the left grip. The Poles made a somewhat less crude safety (strictly trigger-blocking, nothing you'd want to rely on) and put it in front of the left grip. They had to modify the grip for this, and they put a stupid thumbrest on the left grip for additional import points ("It's a target gun - yeah, that's the ticket!") I'm a lefty, so the thumbrest got in the way of my enjoyment of the gun. I wrote to Poland and had a fellow send me some original grips. I broke the right hand side installing it, but the LH grip is now as it should be - no thumbrest.





The safety got in the way of my trigger finger as well, so I removed it. Gil introduced me to a friend of his who's a good machinist. He made me a part that would block the hole in the frame where the safety had been. I blued it and installed it, and am happy as a clam with it.





The Polish Tokarev may be my most fun gun to shoot. It has enough recoil to let you know that you've launched something of consequence, but the fast-moving 86-grain pill imparts so pleasant a little push that a child would enjoy it. There's a satisfying CRACK! that gets the attention of onlookers, and the bottlenecked rounds never jam. The trigger on the Pole is pretty nice, too - I helped it out with some strategically placed dollops of Militec TW-25B. One thing that strikes me as negative on the Polska Tok is that it seems to want to rust . . . even here in the desert! I wax mine after I clean it, and it seems to do okay. I've thought about having my gunsmith friend hard-chrome it, but I'm not sure that it would look right.

It gives nice velocities. The easily found S&B 86-gr FMJ (also marketed as Winchester USA ammo for slightly more money) does an average of 1531 fps out of this slender pistola. Romanian surplus ammo does 1516. I have some neat Yugo stuff on which . . . gee . . . . the bullets are attracted to magnets. I'll bet that's a decent penetrator!

Anyway, I have carried it on hikes in the mountains, I've carried it (nothing in the chamber, full mag) around town - its slim profile makes it easy IWB, but I don't usually carry it. I just like to have it. Anyone else have Toks that they like?


 

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Nice Tok Erich!

My father has a Chinese model he bought several years ago in 7.62 with the 9mm conversion barrel. It works great and it most definitely has a REPORT...let off a round of 7.62x25mm and you KNOW you've let one off.

The Chinese bluing rust too next to the body, my pops carried his for more than a year round chambered hammer all the way down and never felt undergunned, still carries it from time to time, in place of an Officer's 1911.

Right now he runs some Chinese surplus ammo in it, but Wolf has just come out with a "Gold" line in 7.62x25 with an 85-grain HP, brass case, and boxer primed. I'm looking to snatch a box for him and set some off down range.

The gun is dead nuts reliable...never so much as a hiccup in 7.62 and just a couple of bobbles when running the 9mm conversion. Really actually it is a ton of fun to shoot!

Glad you enjoy yours!

-Rob

PS: I don't know if you know it, but a full size 1911 holster fits the gun perfectly and tight.
 
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An interesting story.

I have a couple of Chinese Toks made for the export market, and a WWII Russian one. (Of course, they all have the thumb safety.) I've been watching for a Polish Tok as they have a reputation as the best quality, but they are uncommon. Saw a Vietnam bring-back Tok at a gun show last weekend for $400. It had a pretty rough bore, and the finish was pretty much gone so I passed. Didn't have a thumb safety though.

I want one like you got.


;)
 

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Printed...

Tokarevs are crude but extraordinary guns... extremly compact and slick. The removable action with rounds guides (as in the FN 1903) and hammer spring in the hammer are achievements too. I've been tempted several times but don't have any use for one.

L.
 

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After reading the above about Tokarev's, I wish that I had kept the Tula Arsenal 1939 dated Tt-33 that I had bought in a pawn shop for $60 in 1970. It came with a Russian fullflap leather holster and the bringback paperwork from the Korean War. Like a fool, I sold it for $100 to a collector after I got out of the service.

I do have a 1996 made SIG P210-6 that one of my shooting pals calls a "Gold Cup Tokarev". It does share the removable lockwork of the Tok, but that is about it AFAIC. I've carried the 210 as a BBQ gun a few times. It gets it share of attention from those who know their auto pistols.


Roadster
 
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I have a 1952 dated all matched (including magazine) Hungarian M48 Tokarev-great shooter! One of my favorite handguns-I call her my Glock killer, I've put her against 3 Glocks so far-a G26, G19, G23, and she's outshot everyone of them.
 
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I have a Norinco M213 9mm Tok. Like you, I bought a brand new M213 many years ago NIB from one of the gun dealers here in town. The pistol worked great, but at the time, I wanted something else, so I stupidly traded it in on something long since gone as well.

Needless to say, when I saw this M213 in the case at another local store, I hopped on it. I have discovered that it is simply a great pistol and one of my favorites. The safety is, of course, simply superfluous in a pistol like this...with the Toks, I agree with the Russians that the appropriate safety is to leave the pistol's chamber empty until ready to use, then jack a round in. I find that my M213 is very accurate and also very reliable, but only with 115-grain ball ammo, regardless of manufacturer. If I attempt to get it to feed JHPs, it looks like the rounds are simply too short and they either nosedive or fail to feed, so I'll probably be looking at either the Remington EMJ or the Cor-Bon Pow'rBall to see if either of those will work. Otherwise, I'll stick with the ball ammo and shoot the snot out of the pistol.

The stock magazines which came with the gun were tired and require spring replacement. I assume that the replacement mag springs are available somewhere, but haven't yet done a search, so I haven't rebuilt the mags. I did find a source for Pro-Mag replacement mags and, although they're cheaply constructed with plastic followers, they do, in fact, work great.

Like you, I love the thinness of the piece and the fact that it's primitive, all-steel and made for harsh conditions. If I had nothing else, I would not hesitate to carry it and it's one of my favorite shootin' pistols, being essentially recoilless and possessing the capability to throw projectiles consistently to point of aim.

I'm definitely keeping this one.

Bob
 
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Is the removal of the 'safety' on the import Chinese Tok/Norinco pistols a common gunsmith modification? If so, I'd sure be interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can't say I can recall any specific info to answer your question: I never messed with the safety on my Norinco, only the one on my Polska.
 

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Is the removal of the 'safety' on the import Chinese Tok/Norinco pistols a common gunsmith modification? If so, I'd sure be interested.
It's actually possible to do it at home.

I haven't done it in awhile, but basically you need to remove the grips (if you have wrap around grips). Then remove the two screws on either side of the safety (they act like stops). From there you can twist the safety around and remove it from its hole. That's it...watch out for the ball detent and spring in the safety, they will fall out as you remove it. All the safety does is prevent the trigger from activating the sear/mainspring (I can't remember exactly how it works right now).

It's a pretty simple job and can be completed in less than half an hour.

-Rob
 

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I really hate to dredge up a topic that's almost two years old, but I just picked up a Romanian Tok today at a show. I haven't shot it yet, because I spent all day cleaning it, and trying to put the grips back on, and it's not registered yet (excuse me, it hasn't had it's "safety inspection" yet). I really like it though. I'll get pictures as soon as I get fresh batteries in the camera.

Luckily, the gun didn't come with broken grips like some I've heard about, but I took care of that. Snapped the corner off the left grip trying to put it back on, but I super-glued it. I had a problem with the latch on that panel, or more specifically with the frame on that side. They obviously didn't mill enough away, because even with the grip completely snapped in, the latch would hit the frame, so I had to touch a couple spots with a file. Not pretty, but you can only see the work when the grips are off, and needless to say, they're never coming off again. Besides, they're personalized. Not really, but coincidentally, my initials are the same as the abbreviation for the Romanian People's Republic that is under the star on the grips.

The price tag said $295, but the sign on table said that all guns in the case (which mine was) were10% off, and if the transaction was cash, he would cover the sales tax. So in the end, I paid $265.50. A bit higher than some prices I've heard about, but still reasonable, and that included the gun, two mags, holster and cleaning rod, and 100 rounds of ammo. And it was still the cheapest one there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That's a pretty good deal on the Romanian.

Odd thing: a friend of mine had his Romo acting funny on ejection (consistently hitting him in the head). He pulled the gun apart and found that there was no extractor spring inside it. He rigged one and the gun now performs just as he wanted it to. (I'd never heard of a gun coming without a part before.)

His Romanian works well, BTW.
 

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I'm really looking forward to shooting it. I've wanted a Tokarev for a long time. I passed on one at a show last year, and the only thing that's kept me from kicking myself has been the Colt 1903 I got instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Similar look, eh? :)

I really like shooting the Toks. Very satisfying "CRACK!" from the bullet, but not much recoil. And the surplus ammo is still fairly inexpensive.
 

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Hello Erich,

Kinda like a .357 SIG?

Man, you are killing me with the cool handguns you get!

Best,

Chris
 

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Erich said:
Similar look, eh? :)

I really like shooting the Toks. Very satisfying "CRACK!" from the bullet, but not much recoil. And the surplus ammo is still fairly inexpensive.
I can definitely see the similarity in styling, although I'll have to give the award to the little Colt.

I noticed the price on surplus ammo. The guy who sold me the gun was selling 100 rounds for $12. I probably should've bought some, but he threw in that hundred rounds with the gun, and rarely shoot that much in one session, or three.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi Chris,

The .357 SIG is definitely more onerous to shoot than the Tok - I had one of the first Glock 33s and the concussion against my chest got to be pretty exhausting. None of that with the Toks, though they do share the .357 SIG's marvelous feeding ability (you're dropping a little pole into a fat hole - these bottlenecked rounds simply do not jam :) ).

Kilroy, on quality of looks and general fitment, no doubt the old Colt wins. :)
 
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