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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone own one of these? I'm thinking about buying one, held it, got a feel for the terrible DA pull at like 37 pounds, but didn't think the SA was too bad.

Range/fun gun only, not to be carried.

The big question, has anyone had on with a good trigger job done on it or is there room in this old and small design for a trigger job?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have three of these. A heavy DA trigger pull like you describe is common on first-generation (i.e. pre-war (II)) and on many post-war DA auto designs. The problem is in the design geometry of the parts that link the trigger to the hammer, which is not something that really can be dealt with by gunsmithing. It's an issue of "mechanical advantage" of the trigger over the hammer's spring. The only reasonable way to lighten the DA trigger is to use a lighter aftermarket hammer (main) spring. Try www.gunsprings.com, as they make aftermarket springs for just about any handgun. I have no idea what hammer spring weight that you would need to drop down to to significantly lighten the trigger pull, not having done it. Also at some point, if you lighten the hammer spring too much, you will get too light of a hammer fall which will fail to reliably touch off the primers. This isn't really something that's commonly done on these little autos. But if Wolff Gunsprings offers mainsprings for the HSc that are lighter than OEM factory ones, somebody's doing it.

It would only be of a real concern if you were planning on carrying the little pocket auto for personal defense, as the heavy DA trigger could pull it off target on the first shot . (But then, most people in a personal defense scenario lose fine motor-control skills under the stress of such an encounter and it really doesn't matter a lot how light or heavy the trigger pull is. They're probably going to crunch the trigger through really hard no matter what.)

For use as a "Range/fun gun" I would just shoot it single-action.


Of note, the little Walther pocket autos (the handguns for which Mauser developed the HSc to compete against in the marketplace during the 1930's) also notoriously have heavy DA triggers. When Smith & Wesson began manufacturing these for Walther a few years ago, they redesigned the trigger linkage for a much lighter DA trigger pull. (I have a 1930's commercial Walther PPK and one made within the last year by S&W.) It only took 70-some years before somebody decided to improve this problem on the little Walthers.


Go down to the thread titled "An old Mauser" on this forum at http://www.handgunsandammo.proboards36.com/index.cgi?board=Discussion&action=display&thread=1169465741

for a recent discussion on these little Mausers.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your very detailed post, Alan.

I have spotted one, handled it about a week ago at a local shop.

Mauser HSc, .380, nickel finish, used in excellent condition with original box, original manual and paperwork, two magazines, cleaning rod. $400 negotiated down from a marked $450.00. Seller will lay it away, necessary for me as I just put a SA XD45 on layaway about a week before seeing the Mauser.

Additionally, I'd like to make a first purchase from the seller, good guy, spent lots of time with me, runs a nice shop and would be a good one to start a repoire with.

What do you think of the price, should I do it, and are the nickel finished .380s much less common than the blued versions, I've only seen this one locally or on the internet after a great deal of looking into the HSc.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In my area $400-450 for the item you describe in its condition is a fair market price. For the "negotiated down" price that you were able to get I would sure go for it if you want the handgun. Of the post-war commerical HSc's imported into this country, the nickel finished ones are much less common than the blued ones, but aren't rare. I don't know the split between the .32 ACP and .380 ACP ones as far as the types of finishes, but I would guess that they are about the same.
 

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The Mauser.32 Hsc has been my wifes #1 gun for 25yrs+. She never left the home with out it. She shot it at the range at lease once a month and is very accurate with it. I just put a new recoil spring and mag springs in it and it is running just fine. We have everything it came with,but it is not for sale. They are a fine little pocket gun and ours has stood the test of time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Very few autopistols made today (short of ones costing $1,500-3,000 --- and commonly not even then) are manufactured to the quality standard of the little Mausers.

They are a product of a bygone era.
 

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I agree on the quality of design (except for the hammer bite problem) and manufacture of these little Mauser.

The stiff DA pull is a problem common on most of these DA small pistol: you need a mainspring strong enough to ignite the round and don't have to much place to give enough leverage on the action.

In addition, the HSc's SA hook on the hammer gives a hearable and feelable click to the trigger in DA pull. It is mentionned in the old WW2 manual and conceived as a last ditch warning before the drop. Some shooters consider it as a lousy pull. I find it practical to stage as with a S&W revolver.

L.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the responses fellas, particularly Alan, your "encouragement" prompted me to go and pick the HSc up today. Thought I might have to lay it away, but I sold some old records!

Very nice pistol, really high quality in my opinion.

This is my first .380. The question, can 9mm tools like boresnakes, brushes, jags be used on this pistol in .380, I think they can and are entirely appropriate but want to make sure.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The nominal bore diameter of the .380 ACP is the same as 9mm, .355".

Enjoy your new baby.
They just don't make'm like that any more.
 

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Managed to find a WWII 7.65 two weeks ago...great shape except for the checkering on the grips being worn smooth, probably a 95% -er otherwise. I harbor no illusions about its utility, it will be strictly for fun.
 

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Hello Dave,

They are fun, except for hammer bite. Mauser managed to make an abreviated, streamlined hammer that bites!

Bye.

L.
 

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One reason I like the HSc - I've had 5-6 in the past two decades, all .380 - over other pocket double action pistols is the non-hammer drop safety. Chamber a round and put on the safety. When it comes time to fire, flip up the safety and fire single action. The Walther and the like make you fire D/A unless you cock on the draw or line up. The Mauser isn't cocked and locked, but it's cocked and safe.

Also, I hate the heel clip magazine release, but love the "slam home the mag and the slide follows" without having to slingshot it. For me, it makes for a very fast recover time after a reload, not a tactical advantage considering the piece, but nice none the less.

Finally, I remember an art history teacher in college who extolled its art deco slihouette.
 

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I had a war-time 7.65 that seemed better made than the post-war .380s I handled/shot. Wish I had kept it. :(
 

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I have a cousin who has one. Seems well made but the trigger, as mentioned above is pretty bad in DA.

The same was true for every Walther PPK type (including PP, PPK/s) I ever owned. I did test a pre-war PPK that had a good DA trigger (relabively speaking...even it was around 14 lbs!) but that is the only one. Should have bought that one.

Jim H.
 

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Jim

try out the PPK/S Smith&Wesson is selling. mine has a DA around 10-11# and the longer tang is an improvement as well.

I really like the thing I just can't figure out what a .380 automatic is good for:))
 
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