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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the Basics

My goal here is to fill a hole often left in training both new shooters, and seasoned shooters. All too often people ignore the basics, either because they never learned them, or because they are too caught up in the latest and greatest
 

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Good point Anthony;

The first thing "advanced" students want to know is "When do we jump out of the flaming helicopters?"

My answer is "As soon as you master the fundamentals" ( I don't tell them that I haven't *mastered* them yet, I just know how important they are).

That said, at some point we do have to also apply the most esential of the fundamentals (grip, sight alignment, sight picture, trigger control, recovery and follow-through) and give up a comfortable, stable stance because to use it in a fight will increase the odds of collecting bullet holes. I also think we need to ignore breathing for the closest encounters...the trick is to be breathing when the fight is over ;)

Why do I give up on "stance" so quickly? I do teach it for the first level of CQM but with the caveat that soon we will be either shooting on the move (hard to get a solid "stance" while you are not standing still) or from cover. The rule for cover is: "If you are comfortable you have too much of yourself exposed." Of course as ranges increase (to say over 100 meters we need to get back to those basics also, since we have a bit more time, hopefully.

A minor part of the BRM "solid position" is to extend the firing side elbow...we eschew that also for CQM/CQB. 2 reasons: 1. the "pocket" in the shoulder that is formed disapears when you cover it with 4" of body armor (it is also too far from the center of the body) and 2. It flags your presence when maneuvering and can get shot off before you can even see the threat.

I think Townsend Whelen said it best. The trick to shooting effectively is to align the sights on the target and press the trigger without disturbing them. Gee I wish I had said that :-[

Great topic!!!!
Onward,
Jim
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jim,

Totally agree with the elbow comment. As one that runs around in body armor more often than not these days, that's 100% true. I don't stick my elbow out even when I'm not in armor, maybe a little, but no more than I would *in* armor. The loss of stability is indeed a given, and I'd planned on covering it later. In Basic we did BRM long, long, long before we did MOUT. There are tricks to attaining as much stability, or at least consistency, as possible in combat/defensive shooting - and I'll cover a few later. "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast" covers it pretty well. It's pretty amazing how fast slow can be at times!

Anthony
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree with most of what has been said but would add trigger control to the mix. The first shot in most guns requres a bit of take up before pressure is put on the sear and the shot breaks. On follow up shots the trigger should be released only far enough for the disconnector to reset itself (a relatively short distance compared to the full range of motion of the trigger) and pressure applied to break the next shot. This technique will actualy improve speed and reduce trigger slap, or jerk.
I don't think that "stance" can be over emphasized. Once this basic fundamental has been mastered, you then strive to duplicate the "feel" of this solid stance in awkward situations.
 

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I remember seeing a visual display of where bullets end up when one jerks the trigger, etc, with respect to where one wants the bullets to hit. Can't find it now. Anyone help-----

Thanks,
 
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