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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In reading the article "my choice in plastic pistols" and the Glock 26, you put five rounds of Federal loads into what looked like the size of a quarter from 15 yards!

I was very impressed by this, both in combination, by your shooting, the load and the compact Glock which doesn't exhibit an ideal grip handle. The Federal appeared to group better than the other loads tested.

Don't be humble, how much of this is you being a great shot?

Essentially I'd like to hear about your technique for slow and precision shooting. Some tips, maybe.


From the article:

"Not a "match gun" by any standard, the Glock possesses plenty of accuracy for its intended purpose and is capable of better than the "combat accuracy" mentioned by some gun writers. Despite its short grip, I was very pleased that it is easy to shoot. The abbreviated grip presented me no control problems and allowed for both a precise hold for slow, precision shooting as well as for the faster "practical" drills. While felt recoil is subjective, varying from shooter to shooter, I did not find the G26 objectionable to shoot with even the hotter loads such as the Corbon or Winchester shown above."
 

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Hello. First, thank you for the kind words. I do wish I could shoot like that off-hand, and at one time I could every now and then, but not in several years. Eyesight is not as good and reflexes combined with a slowly diminishing ability to precisely control the trigger off-hand is taking its toll. The groups were fired in slow-fire using a two-hand hold and with my wrists supported by sandbags. My aim (no pun intended) was to try and wring out as much of the gun's mechanical accuracy as I could. Not having a machine rest, that's the only way I can try to do this.

Technique is really pretty simple but I cannot do it in one day with a new gun, which the Glock 26 was at that time. I shoot the pistol several times at the range to get the feel of it. This may take 3 or more shooting sessions at the range. I do not shoot more than my concentration lasts or I wind up just wasting ammunition and maybe even picking up bad habits.

Since I'm under no deadline to produce articles, I go back for the "serious" shooting when I am rested and in the mood to do this sort of thing. I try and pick a time when others are not at the range so that I do not have to think about anything at all but what I'm doing.

I only own two Glocks, a 26 and a 17, but both are fitted with AroTek fixed sights. Their front sight is flat; you can balance a dime on them. Sometimes with an empty gun, I'll dry fire it a few times trying no to disturb the dime while slowly and carefully pressing the trigger. I did that with the Glock 26 because the front sight allowed it.

There have been days when I went to the range intending to do a report on a certain handgun or another, fired a few shots and just went back to the house; it just wasn't going to happen that day. I don't know why, but some days I simply cannot perform to what I feel is needed if the article is to be of any use.

An example would be the report I recently did on the FN FNP9 pistol.
The groups shot were satisfactory for the article, but on a separate shooting trip since then, about the best I could do, even with a rest was about 3 or 4"!

FWIW, since doing that test a few years ago, I have read where others have opined that the "Baby Glock" was capable of better groups than their full-size versions. I do not know if that's due to some different "geometry" in the short gun vs the standard or the short and uncomfortable (to me) grip on the little gun forces one to concentrate harder. I know that I was favorably impressed and frankly a little surprised at what could be done with the Glock 26. I guess that is why I still have the butt ugly little thing.

Shortly before retiring from police work where I was also a firearm instructor, I noticed my groups getting larger and no matter how hard I tried and tried and tried and tried, I could not get them smaller...except for the fluke now and then. It took me forever to figure out that the front sight was no longer sharp. My vision was changing. I got my eyes checked and new glasses, but that still didn't help all that much. My eye doctor is a shooter and I had a set of shooting glasses made that did allow me to see the front sight sharply. Well, 8 years later I need to do that again but I'll do the reading glasses thing first and see if that works; others report that it has. The reason my slow-fire groups are at 15 yards is because with my glasses off, I can see the front sight sharply and the target is not too badly blurred to have a precise point of aim. 25 yards currently is except on "good days" and sometimes fifty but if tired, as I often am being an insomniac, fifteen is usually it.

Best.
 

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Mr. Camp,

Just a thought here, something I was going to try:

My parents were in to bowling for a bit when they were younger. After I took my dad's bowling ball out a few times I noticed a leather brace of some sort. I asked and found out that it was a wrist brace for bowling (I was young).

I tried it on and I couldn't move my wrist. I thought it was one of the coolest things I've seen in a while.

I've thought recently about getting two of them, one for each wrist. I'm still not pleased with my 25 yard shooting and want to start eliminating variables. I have Rx glasses that I don't wear because they make it harder to focus on the front sight, and I'm not handicapped without them. My vision just goes to 20/30.

My insomnia has gone way down. The trick that works for me is that I keep one of the dogs in my bedroom. That way I feel I can "turn off" into a very pale yellow or white condition and trust the dog to be alert for me. I had an incident the other day where I was sleeping and somebody began pounding on my front door. As I got up and grapped a gun (the Carpati in this case) the dog, my sisters German Shepherd mix we have in quarantine for her trip to England, charged the door, giving me a little extra time to conceal it properly. Ended up it was just some dumbass kid who got his truck stuck in the neighbor's yard and needed to use the phone, but the dog did let me be better prepared.

Josh <><
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Stephen, if you find the Glock's grip angle uncomfortable, or difficult to work with, try a crimson trace laser grip. It makes the gun feel and point very much like a double-stack 1911, with an arched mainspring housing.
 

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Hello Stephen,

I understand completely where you are coming from and often wonder at some of the incredible groups you do post.

I once read that accuracy testing was indeed "hard work" and required the utmost concentration by gun writers who often could not perform on their own "mental self command" and thereby had to extend their range testing over the course of several days.

Personally, when I go to the range to shoot a new handgun, I am often found "strapped for time" as it is usually a rare day off from work and I have to cram as much into 24 hours as I can complete with mundane tasks including laundry, grocery shopping, home repairs and ect.

My eyesight has become even more "dyslexic" over the past several years making the work even harder.

Regardless, it is still fun and I do enjoy the visual images of the nice accuracy shots you provide for us.

Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tips and thorough explanation of the feat accomplished with the Glock, Stephen.

To me the article proved that the combination of a good load, a good shooter and a good platform are capable of posting remarkable groups. The behind the scenes details on how it was done and techniques employed are appreciated.

Additionally, I have received your two books in the mail, "Defensive Handguns" and "TSG-BHP", rather than type a glowing 500 word review, I'll just give you 5 points that I appreciate in your writing.

1. You say more in a simple paragraph than most gun writers do in a full chapter. Word efficiency and flow.

2. Considering your experience, I've never found that you write above the beginner but are still very interesting to the accomplished shooter and reader. No ego.

3. Details, details, details. But not at the expense of efficiency.

4. Fictional work readers don't get to say "Hey Stephen (King), tell us more about Cujo." Availability.

5. Some may disagree, but I think you're a better writer than shooter, this is fairly uncommon as most gun writers are not great writers though they may be great shots with all the experience in the world.

Thanks for the personalized inscription, a nice bonus.
 

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Gents,

The G26 is justifiably popular. A lot of firepower in a small controllable package. Still the G26/27's have never felt "right" to me. Perhaps I just never got past the awkward stage. My small "go to" Glock is a G36. As Stephen would say "it has more hootus".

Wes
 

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I have also found that a Glock 26 will outshoot a G19 or G17. They shoot like the devil himself...
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It was noted shortly after the "Baby Glocks" came out that they were more accurate than the larger models; something about the lock-up geometry or some such being more favorable in the smaller autos. Don't remember the details.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think one reason for the increaded accuracy is the reduced recoil due to the compound recoil spring in the subcompact Glocks.
 
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