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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

We talk about pistol and long guns and tactics because they are, well, cool. However, we know that we don't really want to put these techniques into practice against another human, no matter how much they might 'deserve' it. It short circuits things for a bit.

That said... what techniques have you found to work when faced with a person who could go either way?

My first is flight. If I simply cannot run away, I do what the anti's suggest and try to reason with the person. If that person seems fixated on something, I will ask them to tell me about it. In other words, if they're talking, they're not fighting me.

Should things head south and they simply want money, I keep a cheap money clip in my pocket loaded with a couple bucks. I figure if they want money and I toss it aside, they'll go after it and I've created an escape route for myself.

Thank you,

Josh <><
 

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Excellent plan Josh! I also try to avoid areas where BG's might be. But you never know, better to be prepared. In places like a Super WalMart parking lot, I survey the area but try to avoid eyecontact with any rough looking individuals. I don't ever want to use 'deadly force'.
However, if someone breaks into my home while I'm there, I will reply with the nearest handgun available.

What do you think? Is home protection in a different category?
og
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OldGrandpa,

Sir, I believe that most home invasions are a different catagory. The perp has already shown intent.

However, there are cases on file where the person breaking and entering is confused- drunk, mentally handicapped, disturbed, etc. I believe that the safe room is a good thing and, in that type of situation, I'd call the calvary and let them handle it. Anyone penetrating the safe room door would be shot.

Josh <><

P.S. I have toyed with the idea of installing cameras and/or remote voice broadcast in this place. J
 

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Avoidance is the pre-emptor to de-escalation.

Having said that, when I instruct personal protection/security I teach what I practice on a daily basis:
First and foremost, avoid areas known to be bad news. It's not worth the risk for a little voyueristic (or other) entertainment.
2. Be alert and aware to what and who is around you, and what they are doing. Look for tell-tale signs of their intentions. "Get out of the bubble!" That means be aware of what is going on outside your immediate surroundings, your vehicle, etc.
3. Anticipate a threat. By anticipating you place yourself on the front edge of the OODA curve.
4. Make eye contact with everyone you meet or pass. It shows them you are aware of them and aware of what they are doing. It also shows that you are not afraid. Staring is confrontational and should be avoided. If you want to be polite, exchange a greeting and a smile - it never hurts.
5. Walk with purpose - like you know where you're going, what you are doing, and that you belong there. Keep you head up and shoulders back. Good posture exhibits self-confidence and strength in body language, but is not confrontational.

For confrontation de-escalation, I teach using non-agressive body language (hands up, out and slightly forward, which co-incidentally puts them in a good position to block strikes, punches, etc.), continued eye contact (you want to know what they are doing), verbal de-escalation (apologising, etc.) and gradually backing off.
There are times when a subject will read that as meakness. Those are the times when posturing from a position of strength needs to be used. That means letting you know that you are prepared for the worst and have every intention to "beat them down" if need be - even if you get hurt doing it. The first step to that is believing what you are saying through your body language, etc.
 
G

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I can tell you from experience that when your home is being invaded you will act on instinct. I've had four thugs pull guns on me in a parking garage, but that was nothing compared to your natural defense mechanism for your OWN home and family. At least in this state no retreat is required for a burglary of a habitation. Rightfully so.
 

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JMM, I would offer that the situations you experienced were far outside the situation de-escalation envelope. You were in the "deal with it" envelope.

Since you are here to talk about it, I know you did everything right.
 
G

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It seems that when the bad guys hit home the training you receive for confrontations get pushed away by instinct. I think de-escalation tactics are definately worthy of more training than I think we receive. It has saved my life. Fortunately, I retained enough when I was with the state to use it in the private sector. But, man, having a home intruder with children in their beds is getting personal. Something seems to "click". Maybe it is the kids. Especially when your unwelcomed visitor has the nerve to smile at you. I've always wondered about that imaginary line between that situation and something on the job. Being in both situations, two different reactions seemed to occurr. Hard to explain.

But, yes, as was said, getting out of that "bubble" is the best thing. Look for the signs and react accordingly. VERY good advice. Sneak attacks ain't fair.
 
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