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Scenario:

You've been forced into a corner by an armed attacker. You're only option? Draw your self-defense handgun and fire. You draw, you fire, your attacker goes down....

Now what?
Should you secure the attacker's weapon?
Should you notify the police?
Should you run to find a secure area and then notify the police?
Should you secure yourself, notify the police, and call a lawyer?
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To be perfectly honest, I am not sure of the best way to proceed after a shooting takes place. I would guess, probably the best thing to do, is after confirming the attacker is down, move to a secure area and notify the police. Then wait for them to arrive after describing yourself to the 911 operator.

The police arrive. Now what? Should I have reholstered my weapon while waiting, or should I have unloaded it and prepared to surrender it to police? I know that I don't want to have the gun in my hand when the police arrive and I know I want my hands in the air, as well.

So, what do you guys think is the "operating procedure" after a shooting?

-Rob
 

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Using your scenerio:

-secure attacker's weapon
-ensure attacker is down/out
-secure your immediate area
-if not safe, go to safe area
-if safe, safety and holster
-call 911 and ID yourself and situation
-call friend/family to call lawyer and come to support you
-attempt first aid on attacker, if safe
-keep wary eye on surroundings, as attacker may have friends/family

Just my first thoughts, I'm sure others will have variations on the theme. I would like to hear an LEO critique of my ideas and hear what they would like to see upon arriving at such a scene.
 

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What Jonny said. I would add to make it clear that YOU ARE THE VICTIM OF A LIFE THREATENING ASSAULT, but otherwise withold any statement until your lawyer is present. Another good move is to seek medical attention for yourself whether or not you are physically injured.
 

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Hi there,

+1 on what abninftr stated.

Also remember that your 911 call is being recorded! Respond to any asked questions as factually as possible under the circumstances.

I was also instructed by the LEO officer that taught my CWP class to not have a weapon in your hand or on your person under any circumstances! The responding LEO's cannot and may not decipher who is the perpetrator/victim when they arrive!

Chris
 
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Just to elaborate a bit on abinftr's post.

In our TXCHL class we were instructed to call 911 first. We were told to call for police help, tell the operator we were the victim of a life-threatening assault, that we had been forced to open fire to save our own life, loved one's, whomever. And that was it as far as the facts of the incident went.

Instructor advised telling officers on scene the same thing, request lawyer, shut up.
 

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Good question. I've been developing my own checklist/procedure, pretty much follows what's been said:

1. Make sure I am really safe. Just because immediate "problem" is solved doesn't mean there are not other threats in vicinity. Look around. Leave area if I have to.

2. "Self-Aid," as the Air Force calls it. No fun surviving the initial event if I bleed out later.

3. Definitely call cops, and try to be first one to do so - ESPECIALLY if there has been no shooting, or bad guy got away. If brandishing the firearm was enough to scare BG away, I don't want him ditching his weapon, then calling cops first about "that crazy guy with the gun."

4. Tell cops I was in fear of my (wife's, whoever) life, fired/brandished in self-defense, and I would love to give them all the details as soon as I talk with my lawyer. Politely repeat ad nauseum as needed.

5. Call lawyer at first opportunity.

I personally would not "secure" the BG's weapon if that means touching it. I would prevent anyone else from doing so, but I would not touch a single item on the scene. Do not want anyone to think I am trying to rig the evidence.

I don't have the links handy, but I have run across a couple police union websites that posted recommendations for officer-involved-shootings (OIS). They also recommend the officer state he fired in self-defense or defense of another, and will provide details after talking with his lawyer. Massad Ayoob has recommended this as well.

The International Association of Chiefs of Police also has a recommended procedure, based on psychological research, for handling OIS's. It includes the following:

"Ideally, the officer should be provided with some recovery time before detailed interviewing begins. This can range from a few hours to overnight. Officers who have been afforded this opportunity are likely to provide a more coherent and accurate statements."

And:

"If the officer has an immediate need to talk about the incident, he or she should be provided with a resource that offers the officer confidentiality or privileged communication."

Sounds like good advice for non-LEO-involved-shootings as well.

BTW - how many of you know right now a criminal defense lawyer, skilled in self-defense scenarios, that you could call if you get involved in a shooting? Me neither, but I am working on it.

elb
 
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Requesting medical attention will get the cops to wait for questions also... Doctor's don't like cops questioning their patients! :)
 
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