Handguns and Ammunition Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,951 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

There are times when I'm shooting a lot of full house 12 gauge loads or magnum handgun loads and end up dizzy and a bit disoriented. I put the firearms up for a bit, sit, and it goes away.

I wear ear plugs and, with the shotty or when shooting near my head, ear muffs. It's like the concussion travels through my head and into my workin's there.

Am I the only one?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 
G

·
Shotguns have always given me a headache. Probably bad technique on my part. I don't know. I can shoot a 338 win mag all day long, but a 12 gauge batters the crap out of me. So, you're probably not the only one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,359 Posts
Sound wave above a certain decibel level can be transmitted by bone into the cranial cavity (where the brain is). This explains your dizziness and headache from shooting magnums and shotguns, particularly on an indoor range.

Similarly, sound waves can be transmitted through pregnant women's abdominal wall, womb and the fluid it contains to the fetus. Not a good thing for the baby, which is why it is suggested that pregnant women avoid shooting or any loud noise exposure during pregnancy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
We all have our limits. Last summer I acquired a CZ 550 in .458 Win mag for a *possible* trip to Africa (we can dream right?).

That was OK but, as planned from the start, I had it rechambered to the .458 Lott which launches a 500 gr. slug at about 2300 fps. This particular rifle has a relativlely thin barrel and weighed only 8.5 to 9 pounds.

Well somewhere between the .458 Win Mag and the Lott in a 8.5 lb rifle lies "my limit". When I fired the Lott (standing yet) I saw bright lights and after about 3 rounds my right arm started to tingle... I know enough to know that the bright lights mean a retina is about to detach!

I stood down from that until I could install one of those CH mercury weights (which I think added at least a pound and a half but perhaps 2) and a Limbsaver recoil pad.

Now it is back to being manageable with the Lott loads.

This was a bit shocking as I had previously traded off a 510 Wells Express (700 gr. bullet @ 2400 fps) but that gun weighed nearly 14 lbs and I traded it off because it was too heavy and unhandy. It did not hurt nearly as bad but then most of my handloads only drove a 650 cast "practice" bullet at around 2100 fps). Even then I could not shoot more than one shot from kneeling as it would shove me over in the dirt...didn't hurt like that Lott but it was an "irrestable force" for me. The guy I traded it to is 6'4" and weighs about 350 pounds....he can handle it!

Press on,
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Hello Mr. Higginbotham,

If you can find a smith who does "English" Dangerous game rifles, there are a lot of minor modifications (drop of stock, reshaping and fitting) that can ease the felt recoil and make the rifle quicker to shoulder and allow an instant sight picture (I dream about going over to the Dark Continent as well
) and have a Brevex Mauser Magnum X action and an English styled Pattern 14 conversion that is waiting for me to decide what they will become...Decisions, Decisions.....

As far as recoil and the dizziness and disorientation it is linked to the same phenomona as climbing into the ring with Mohammed Ali (at his height) and letting him use you as a warm up for the big event. The brain is pliable in a limited sense and it can bounce around in the skull and repeated stresses (like firing a rifle that have the potential of generating free recoil in the area of 60 + pounds, shotgun is about 30 pounds with bird loads more or less) will cause limited localized damage, much like a mild concussion and the concussive effect of shooting a heavy can also effect your inner ear and that too is related to balance. It can also cause rather more severe damage such as a detached retina.

Then you have the increased effect of muzzlebrakes and M2 Brownings fired with no prior warning, but that is another story.

Regards, Mueller
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
Mueller;

I forgot to mention that I had the same gunsmith who rechambered the gun cut the L.O.P. to fit me.

Naturally this was before I had to add the new pad but, fortunately it is about the same length as the Pachmyer Decelerator that came on the gun, now I just have to reshape it to fit the stock better.

One big mistake was in purchasing the gun (it was off the shelf) in the European Version. They also make an American version which has a bit better stock shape and bigger footprint. My next one will be this type of stock and I may yet get the same type for my Lott. But it is OK now with the new pad and weight.

Good point though. When the guns get serious one had best put some thought into it. They wrote a song in my honor. I think it was called "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread." :-/

Best regards,
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
I second abninftr's comment about sound waves traveling through bone, for my doctor has strongly recommended that I not only use ear plugs and muffs at the pistol range, but a shooting glove as well. A shooter himself, he assures me that vibrations do travel from the hand through the bone structure to the inner ear. My tinnitus is a real frustration, and now I do whatever is recommended by the professionals to prevent exacerbating the problem. Too bad I didn't learn earlier.
 
G

·
Joshua and all,

As noted stock fit is all important when stocking the medium or large bore rifles/shotguns.

The Brits have long known this...take a look at an H&H, Jefferies, Rigby, and a host of other fine makers of "best" quality rifles. You will see what proper stock design looks like. Slim in the wrist with a long curving(stalking) grip design. Rifles need to be stocked to your LOP. If not you are hyperextending your arms and are unable to ride the recoil. Proper drop becomes an issue, as well.
A well built rifle should feel "alive" in your hands...I have two such rifles and they are joys to hunt with...
Most factory stocks are an abomination, but will work OK if you have a proper LOP. Without that all I can say is that you must enjoy the punishment... :-[
Should you want a rifle of this type built I highly recommend that you contact the American Custom Gunmakers Guild. It's members are artisan's of the old school. My last rifle was made by Steve Nelson, Nelson's Custom, Corvallis, OR. Steve did the metal work, stock, etc. Jeromme Glimm did the engraving.
This rifle is showcased in the current issue of Rifle Magazine. The article, by Stan Trazonic, is on page 20.
I hunted with this rifle this season and it is a joy to carry and shoot.
Custom rifles are expensive, but well worth it, IMHO. You now will have a tool and companion to accompany you on your hunts. Something about rust blued steel and fine english walnut.

Wes
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,951 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hello all,

Thank you for the comments thus far.

I may not have been clear in the original post. I can take severe recoil. It's kinda' fun in its own way.

What I'm talking about is the blast that issues from the barrel. When I shoot magnums especially it feels like the concussion wave comes back and smacks my brains. I don't know how else to describe it. If any of you are familiar with stereo systems with very heavy, loud bass, it's similar to that. Bass does it to me also.

Thanks again all,

Josh <><
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,359 Posts
Josh,
The transmission of sound waves (blast shock waves also) through bone and soft tissue that I mentioned in an earlier post is what is causing the discomfort you experience. While you "personally"(read mentally/emotionally) may not be sensitive to the sound/shock waves, your anatomy physically is sensitive to it.

Once again, the joke about the man who went to the doctor about a pain problem rings too true.

The man said to the doctor, "Doc, it hurts when I do this."

The doctor repied, "Well, don't do that!"
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top