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What are the pros and cons of a reddot scope v.s. an optical scope (with crosshairs) on a handgun? Like for target shooting. Long range or short range? Does caliber make a difference?
Experiences?
Curious,
og
 

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Basically optics can help you in two areas;

1. they simplify the sight picture from 3 things (front sight - rear sight - target) to 2 things (reticle - target), *if* the paralax is adjusted out correctly for the range.

2. They may help you to see better (light gathering, magnification).

Most dot optics do not have magnification so they dont help in #2. But they are good for #1 and are a boon to those (like me) who are getting on in age and cannot focus as well as we used to.

Conventional L.E.R. scopes come in a variety of powers of magnification. The advantage in seeing better is sometimes countered by the fact that we also see our "wobble zone" better also and this can cause confidence to suffer on the shot.

A disatvantage is that it can take a really steep "learning curve" in order to learn to make target acquisition from the presentation of the weapon. This of course would not be factor in say hunting from a stand.

I have used them a bit and I would not, at this point, ever put an optic on a defense handgun. Not so on a carbine where you can get a cheek weld - that is a horse of a different color.

But for hunting things which stand still for a few seconds either one might be a help...I lugged along a scoped revolver where I had to deer hunt with a handgun last week (it was either that or a shotgun and I don't really like shotguns at range).

Hope this helps,
Jim
 

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Basically optics can help you in two areas;

1. they simplify the sight picture from 3 things (front sight - rear sight - target) to 2 things (reticle - target), *if* the paralax is adjusted out correctly for the range.

2. They may help you to see better (light gathering, magnification).

Most dot optics do not have magnification so they dont help in #2. But they are good for #1 and are a boon to those (like me) who are getting on in age and cannot focus as well as we used to. Most are a bit quicker to achive a sight picture than scopes (and slower than iron sights).

Conventional L.E.R. scopes come in a variety of powers of magnification. The advantage in seeing better is sometimes countered by the fact that we also see our "wobble zone" better also and this can cause confidence to suffer on the shot.

A disatvantage is that it can take a really steep "learning curve" in order to learn to make target acquisition from the presentation of the weapon. This of course would not be factor in say hunting from a stand.

I have used them a bit and I would not, at this point, ever put an optic on a defense handgun. Not so on a carbine where you can get a cheek weld - that is a horse of a different color.

But for hunting things which stand still for a few seconds either one might be a help...I lugged along a scoped revolver where I had to deer hunt with a handgun last week (it was either that or a shotgun and I don't really like shotguns at range).

Hope this helps,
Jim
 

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Guys, hello. I'm new here. I have a question for you. I recently started shooting, and recently I bought a Beretta. And now I think about what else I need to buy. Can you please tell me if I need to buy a scope at the initial stage or is it all stupid ideas? And what else can you advise to buy, and what is too early to buy?
What Berretta did you buy? Most of their handguns would not lend themselves to scopes. Even red dots are difficult to mount on a number of their handguns. But red dots actually make it easier to learn trigger control for new shooters, as it is one less thing to keep track of. I usually buy extra magazines, as most manufacturers don’t supply enough with their guns. Cleaning supplies with a brush or jag that matches the caliber. If you intend to carry it or use it in competition, a holster that is molded to the model of the handgun is a must when you get to that point. Some way to secure your gun when it is not in your control, above and beyond the chintzy locks that come with them. Eye protection is a must, and electronic hearing protection is very useful in training & competition, but passive ear plugs and/or ear muffs work when you don’t need to communicate.

Things that are controversial are Weapon Mounted Lights, lasers and silencers. I’m a fan of the last two, not so much the first, but others will see it differently.

I wouldn’t personalize your gun until you are certain you like it enough to spend money on it that may decrease the resale price.
 
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