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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found an interesting gun yesterday. The owner of this little gun shop in Springboro Ohio died two years ago and now the shop is selling off his private stuff. Among the guns I found a Smith & Wesson 1917,90% condition,perfect bore, with a side plate with the Brazilian Star crest 1937 date. There are no import stamps. Serial number is 1689XX.The gun appeared to be a run of the mill Brazilian contract until I looked at the cylinder. There on the cylinder was a US military proof, an eagle head and under it the letter/number S24. The cylinder is numbered to the frame of the gun. On the frame under the cylinder crane the same American Eagle head with the S24 appears. I was starting to think the gun may have been among the last of the 1917 revolvers getting proofed for acceptance in the US military supply chain when the contract was canceled at the end of the war...only to go in storage at Smith and Wesson to eventually be sold and sent to Brazil. Any thoughts gang?

The barrel is also numbered to the frame and cylinder too. There is not US property Stamp on it. The dealer tossed in a nice M1909 holster (G&K 1918 date)to sweeten the deal along with a limited edition signed and numbered R L Wilson hard back on "The Colt Patterson Book" pistols. Dennis Levett who owned the collection in the book signed it too. A limited run of 3000 signed books. The book had been $125 retail in 2001. Whole package for $325 out the door. Seemed like a great deal sweetened a bit by the mystery of the markings on the Smith & Wesson.
Tim
 

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My guess is that the cylinder was a leftover from the US M1917 production and S&W is notorious for not wasting unused gun parts.


Roadster
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Having done more reading on it that is what I think too. I suspect the inspector checked out the parts and stamped them and then when the contract was canceled they went in storage until the commercial and the Brazilian models were put in production. Great old revolver. Love those old N Frames. Tim
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have both a US military 1917 Smith and another Brazilian. It is not marked like this with the eagle heads. I guess there were two contracts. The first in 1937 the second in 1946 for a total of 25,000 guns. Tim
 
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