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I've seen references on this board and many others to the effect of "my gun has fired xxx rounds without a malfunction" or "I clean my gun every xxx rounds".

I've never kept track of the number of rounds I've fired. Should I?

For those who do, do you keep a log book or something?

If I were to start now, how would be the best way to "guesstimate" how many rounds I've fired from a certain gun?

Kent
 

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I keep track of round-counts for my pistols only. I use a small ring binder. I record date, type and number of rounds fired, and running total. I also include any info like serious jams, breakage, and parts replacement.
 

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I don't make a huge habit of it.

I know that my Taurus has gone 10,000 rounds and I stopped there. I then guesstimate when 5000 rounds are up so I know to replace the locking block. Other than that, not really.

Josh <><
 

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Hiya Kent,

With the carry autos I basically keep track by case count; I bought XX cases for YYYYY gun. This has gotten complicated lately by having more than one piece using the same loads, but for the longest time I used different carry loads in each. Practice ammo (mostly whitebox) I got in bulk before having more than one 9MM.

With rifles and resolvers it comes down to reloading records with some pieces, case counts with others; the load being unique to each piece.

With the .38 Special, there's no way to tell since I basically use the same loads in all of them.



Regards,

Pat
 

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I do it like JohnnyC -- I have a separate notebook for each handgun with the date, place, type ammo, round count, and any problems. I am fanatical enough that I also track it by magazine, primarily so I know I have function tested each mag I will use for CCW. I have 6 mags for one of them, so putting numbers on the mags and tracking the round count makes sure I a) keep a couple qualified for self-defense carry, and b) distribute the load among the rest.

This was helpful when I bought a new Kahr and had repeated failure-to-eject problems with it -- I quickly summarized the types of ammo and number of failures to eject, and Kahr fixed it under warranty (relatively quickly too). I've been tracking it since I got back, and it works great -- except I get occasional hiccups with +P ammo, so I am going to look into that more.

Anyway, I frankly think most people's estimates of pretty much anything far less reliable than keeping a simple record. I know it surprised me how fast the rounds add up for each gun.

elb
 

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Oh and p.s.

Logs were very helpful when I was reloading .38s for my revolvers - kept me straight on which loads I had tested in which revolver.

elb
 

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I keep count until the piece is broken in and comfortable. After that I tend to loose count...my Ruger has probably gone anywhere from 5-7000 rounds, I simply don't know because I lost count. Meanwhile, I know my 1911 has gone 150 rounds, simply because I'm breaking the pistol in right now...

I clean my pistols after every range visit, or at least I wipe them down, run a swab or patch down the barrel, and oil them every range session. Field strip and detail cleanings I do every other range session.

-Rob
 
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