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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

I'm not sure whether this is firearm malfunction or operator error, so I'm putting it here for now because it's likely the latter.

When I go to do a speed reload, my empty mag falls out slowly. I've handled other guns like this, but I've also handled ones that shot the magazine halfway across the room.

At any rate, it's annoying to bring a fully loaded magazine up only to encounter my empty one still clearing the gun.

This is on my Taurus PT92. I'm not sure if I'm holding it wrong (I do tip the grip inward a bit) or if it has to do with the magazine springs. They're original but still very strong as these are newer mags. I retired the one that came with it.

I'm not really even that sure what the spring acts on to effect a forceful ejection unless it's against the slidelock, and that doesn't seem to me like it would cause a forceful ejection any which way.

Comments?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Even something as seemingly insignificant as how tight the grip screws are can affect magazines dropping free. Don't worry about why they don't because you can learn and practice a technique that will prevent the 'Bugger, the mag is still there!' problem.

All magazines have a little tab at the front of them. It is there for a purpose. That purpose is to facilitate removing a stuck magazine. So, assuming a two hand grip, what we do is as we move the support hand off grip (and the dominant hand depresses the mag release) we use the index finger or thumb of the support hand to pull firmly down on the tab.

Trust me, it's a technique that is low tech, not fancy by any means, but has been used in tactical shooting since the dawning days of the semi-auto pistol over a century ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Abninftr,

Thank you. These are drop-free mags and do indeed drop free, just slowly unless there are a couple rounds left in them when performing "tactical" reloads.

So this is normal, even on the drop-free stuff?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 
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not sure of exact design of your mag release, But on Brownings and 1911's magazines that drop free during practice and casual shooting suddenly stick during matches. The culprit is a combination of operator and release, In your haste you put more force faster on the mag release, the off side releases but the near side catches and drags on the mag. Basically you are pushing the mag release in too far, You dont notice in casual shooting because even if you push it in too far your moving slower so mag has time to drop a little before getting grabbed by the release. Other than that you just have to look for dragging, and see what is doing it, painting mags with a sharpie and loading and unloading it will give you an idea. There is no reason mags shouldnt fall out when you push the button. The unload tech mentioned by Abninftr is similar to the tac version taught in Fistfire, except the weak hand hits the release and the side of hand / index wipes down the front of the frontstrap catching the mag on way down to the mag pouch. It isnt taught as the best but in the same genre as the slingshot slide release, not the best for certain guns but works ok on all, especially if you end up with an unfamiliar gun, as in going from a 1911 to a HK style release. If they arnt hangng and you are just beating gravity go with some heavier base pads.
 

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Fistfire's technique is indeed a variation on the theme, and works well.


Indulge me by permitting a little history/background.

Semi-autos have been around since before beginning of the 20th century. We all know that and are familiar with the likes of the Mauser C96 and its predecessor, the Borschardt. Europeans embraced Semis a long time before 'Uncle Sugar' started buying 1911s. Europeans, particularly the French and Germans (Prussian et al) had been at each others throats since before Napolean made himself Emporer of France. The Prussians were considered the best at their craft - war fighting. As such, most other countries, including the US were at least influenced by Prussian/German military thinking/practice. Germany was one of the few participants of WWI that universally issued Semi-autos.

The Germans knew that a pistol without magazines (and hence ammo) was effectively just a club. Their procedure from the very beginning was what we call today a 'tactical reload'. There was no 'speed reload' as it meant the magazine ended up in the dirt and usually left behind. This was true in both world wars and remains true today.

Austria, France, Belgium, Italy etc. followed the German example. For instance, Glock magazines were originally designed to not fall free. Glock only started making drop free mags when it became an issue for American shooters who had learned speed reloads at the altar of the 'Modern Technique'.
 
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