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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a right and wrong way or is it just opinion?

...and yes, this is a serious question as I'd like to get the final word on this.

Thanks for assisting me here,
KG59
 

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Both ways work. Racking the slide is more fumble free, and it is what you will be taught at almost evry shooting school in North America.
 
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I assume the slide had locked back when the last round was fired. Then just hit the release and the gun returns to battery with a fresh round ready to be fired. Why would you "rack" the slide to return to battery?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the help here folks.

I actually should have listed three options:

1. Slide/stop/lock/release/catch/lever (darn firearms nomenclature...).
2. Finger pinch or "slingshot" method.
3. Hand over top of slide.

Personally I've tried all three and feel the most reliable and consistent, for me, is #3, hand over top. In the past I've had problems with slide stop manipulation and had some slippage issues with the "slingshot" method.

Also, with #3, I use the same basic move to clear a stovepipe jam and the method is universal (a BIG plus).
 
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I asked this question a couple of months ago, was wondering the same thing. I've always just hit the slide release and dropped the slide, but after stripping my gun the other day I noticed wear on the slide where the slide release hit it due to the way I'd been dropping the slide. Because of that I've changed to "sling-shotting" most of the time in practice, but if I'm in a hurry still hit the slide release. I shoot the gun a lot, it's probably pushing 10K rounds, and the wear is still not troublesome but don't want to do damage I don't have to do.
 
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Personally, I wouln't slingshot in a life-and-death situation, as I've seen the slide stop bounce back up and keep the slide from going back into battery when I've used this method in the past.
 

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I am heading to a defensive shooting course next month with an instructor (Farnam) who I know teaches the weak-hand-over-the-top-of-the-slide method. From some of his writings I gather he teaches this for (at least) two reasons: 1) he says it is a firmer grip, more contact area, lesslikely to slip, and 2) the grip is common to (almost) all the techniques he teaches for manipulating the slide, i.e. grip the slide the same way for loading as for immediate action drills. So, by his standards at least, this is the "right way."

elb
 
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Speed comes from economy of motion, not to mention alot less complicated hitting the slide release, when I slap in magazine my week hand fingers are allmost in proper position as I roll into a forward thumbs position the week thumb hits the release on it's way to index. It's one motion, compared to slapping magazine, removing weekhand completly, grabbing the slide somehow,pulling back, letting go weekhand completely free of weapon again reaquiring weekhand grip indexing pushing gun on target, Seems like an awful inneficient and overly complicated method. Makes zero since to me,
 

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Really?

Not to get into a heated debate about this, but there must be a reason the overhand grip method is taught and used by everybody in SOC from Delta to SEALs as well as almost every "name" shooting school in the US. Could it be that it works 100% of the time no matter if your hands are cold, wet or bloody and the "Pucker-factor" is plus 10 on the Richter Scale? Or, could it be that you just might miss the slide lock under stress and end up second best in a gunfight?

Does it still make zero sense?
 
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I think some of us are missing the fact that you can use the slide release, and if you miss it, can then opt to rack the slide.

I still won't rack the slide first, though, because from certain angles, there's too much chance that gravity and friction will cause the slide stop to not clear the slide.

This is another reason why I prefer the older-style slide-releases found on the 1911 and Hi-Power. They're extreme length makes their operation a gross motor skill, provided you're right-handed. Just hook the thumb, drag it backwards down the top of slide-release, and I guarantee that you'll get a fumble-free release, every time. From there, you can easily slide your hand back down into your normal grip.
 
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Nope still makes zero sense, Probably more of a, "I gotta train a bunch of people with different guns and hand sizes in a classroom setting and come up with one way of training all of them" I also have first hand knowledge that the "Everybody in SOC" statement is partially true at best, Both teqniques were taught. It wasnt taught at the school I attend, granted the grip and presentation technique is different than most and using that technique you would see what I am talking about with the hit release on the way to extension economy of motion I was talking about.
 
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to the original poster... Your chances of getting the final word on this is about as good as doing the ole 9mm .45 thing.
 

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I use the "rack the slide" method- now.
I used the slide stop until I took my first class. They taught the slide rack, but didn't really care what you used. Since I will at least TRY a method taught at a class, I tried it for a while, and stayed with it.

A few reasons:
-As already said- it works with most autos.
I usually carry a 1911, but sometimes will carry a HiPower or HK P7. The 1911 and HiPower have similar operating slide stops, but the P7 is different. By using the overhand slide rack, one system works with all three of those.

-It's a gross motor function.
I can do it if I'm nervous, or even if missing a thumb and/or a finger or two.
Which reminds me- Anyone who has been through a class or match where they use cutouts of guns to simulate bad guys has seen that the "guns" take a lot of hits. I have never done any, but I hear Force-onForce exercises using Simunition guns have similar results- a lot of shots to the guns or hands.
We focus on the threat.
Based upon that, the chances of taking a bullet in the hand/finger/thumb by the time one needs to reload may be rather high. I'd like to see some stats on that, though.

-I don't have to change my firing grip.
When hitting the slide stop with my thumb, I have to shift the gun in my hand. I don't while using the overhand slide grab. I'll take anything that will help me avoid avoid shifting my grip, which could cause the risk, however small, of dropping the gun.

-My backup/spare/shoot 'em off me gun is a Kahr.
The slide stop is flat and is a little stiff operating, making it easy for my thumb to slide off. The overhand slide grab works better for me there.
 

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Joe,
I would guess that your first hand SOC experience did not include SIG P226s and left handed shooters. I'd also guess that your classroom experience hasn't included too many Lefties or SIGS.

You are right though, that there is no hard and fast answer for this question.

You are right
 

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Hello,

I'm a lefty and usually slingshot the thing. In alternative practice I can hit a long slide release like on the Taurus/Beretta 92 with my middle finger of my right hand when coming up to a two handed grip.

However, for me, grabbing the slide and yanking on it just works best.

Josh <><
 
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I'm using the slide rack on my XD, now. Its slide stop is too small and stiff for me to properly activate, every time.
 
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reloads_fwd-rev_rock.mov - 394KB

I've found it's not more than 2-3/10ths slower on a shot timer to use the OHR method. Shooting a Glock makes it pretty much your only option. I tried to use the slide stop method on my Glock to see how long it would last... didn't make it a week before the metal flow made it no longer lockback.
 
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