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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

What's the interest/utility of porting in a .357 Mag revolver? I'd like to buy a Taurus 66 (unported) or a 627 (ported one). And I wonder which one
 

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Jonas,

Howdy sir and welcome. I am certainly not an expert on porting, but I have owned one revolver I had it done to. At the time I was carrying a 4" model 57 Smith, .41 magnum as my primary duty weapon.

I wanted to be able to recover more quickly in rapid fire, and found the Mag-na-port did really help reduce muzzle climb. But at night the flash from escaping gases from the ports are disconcerting to some folks. I did not mind as it helped me pick up my front sight blade temporarily, without destroying my night vision. But I admit it took some shooting to get accustomed to that new extra too.

At the time there were only two rounds commerically available for the .41 magnum. A 210 gr lead "police" load which was simply too light a round for me to want to use. The other was a 210 gr soft point "hunting" load, which was a bit stout. That was where the porting helped in quicker recovery for me.

I did carry several .357 magnums and a 45acp which I never had ported. If you are recoil sensitive, then I think the porting, along with a good set of grips could help to reduce that problem for you. If you are not, I am not sure there is a real need to have a .357 magnum ported, unless the idea simply appeals to you.

Just my opinion for what it is worth. Others may disagree with me, which is fine. Hope this helps a little.

twoguns
 
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Porting of handguns is strictly a measure to reduce muzzle-flip and speed recovery for rapid-fire shooting for law enfocement and gaming (IPSC, etc.) purposes.

For recreational shooting you don't need it. (I have only one ported handgun, and the porting had nothing to do with my purchase of it.)

It's not the "rage" it was in the 1980's and into the 1990's and far fewer factory handguns are ported than in the past.
 
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Isnt a 66 a short barreled snubby? If you want easier shooting for sport use get a longer barrel, on a defensive arm porting is dangerous. The first time you shoot from retention you may end up permanetly damaging your eyes. A weapon purchased for self defense if it is ever actually used has a high likelyhood of being used at very close range.
 

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Mr. Jonas,

I'm glad we could help you with your decision. When you are able to buy it, please give us your thoughts on it.

Take care,

twoguns
 
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My bad I was thinking of their snubbies alot of them ported. In a six inch recreational shooter I wouldnt consider port or non port It wouldnt matter one way or the other.
 

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I think Jonas got his basic question answered, but to re-emphasize joe4d's point on snubbies: I have a Taurus 85 snub with porting, and it does indeed shoot fire and bits of metal past, or into, the face if held close to the body, speed-rock style. My wife got a pretty good ding on her forehead from a piece of jacket material shaved off and routed through the port holes. In practice we always wear close fitting protective glasses but using the snub in "the real deal" could indeed be debilitating for the shooter as well as the target.

elb
 

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Good points for folks to take note of.

Mine was a 4" that I shot frequently for about 5 years and never had any blowback problems with. When my last Chief walked through the door, he said it was an "excessive force" lawsuit waiting to happen, but then he had retired from NYPD and thought a .38 spc was all any cop should ever need. After all it was all he ever needed - not exactly a progressive thinker, lol.

Of course he did not object when I carried my 45 combat commander in place of it, so I never did understand his logic anyway.

But the safety concerns are certainly worth noting, especially for a snub handgun. I can't pull mine out and try it now, as I sold it right after he said I could not carry it any longer. Man I always wish I had held on to that one too. It was definitely a keeper.

But thanks for the heads up guys.

twoguns
 
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. . . . on a defensive arm porting is dangerous. The first time you shoot from retention you may end up permanetly damaging your eyes. A weapon purchased for self defense if it is ever actually used has a high likelyhood of being used at very close range.

I have a Taurus 85 snub with porting, and it does indeed shoot fire and bits of metal past, or into, the face if held close to the body, speed-rock style. My wife got a pretty good ding on her forehead from a piece of jacket material shaved off and routed through the port holes. In practice we always wear close fitting protective glasses but using the snub in "the real deal" could indeed be debilitating for the shooter as well as the target.

These are the reasons that porting has been falling out of favor. Cops were some of the first to experience this issue in training, suffering eye injuries in some cases. In one incident a cop had his prescription glasses blow clean off his face.

They are O.K. for the gun games, where legal, the super-magnums where any "straw" is grasped to minimize recoil, and maybe for lots of fast shooting at a charging bear or some such where you want to put as much lead accurately downrange in as short a time as possible.
 

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I vote no on porting due to upward direction of muzzle flash which I find to be blinding in low light situations. There are exceptions and some muzzle breaks to a great job of breaking up flash. Only my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for these additional advices! It convinces me not to buy a ported revolver. I already have bad eyes: I always was short-sighted, but since about 3 years, I'm also far-sighted!!! It's nice to become old!!!
:(" title=":mad:" border="0"/> With my glasses, I can see the target, but no more the gun's sight, without them, it's the contary! So if I add the risk of beeing blinded by the flash
 

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Jonas,

Yes my friend, isn't older age a wonderful experience. But then I do keep reminding myself that it certainly beats the alternative or not getting older too (grinning).

Just a suggestion sir. Regardless of what weapon you are shooting, when you take your glasses off, please put some type of safety glasses on in place of them. We only have two eyes, and while mine are not as good as they once were, I still want to keep both of them functioning as well as they can.

I also use both good Sonic type ear plugs and the best shooting muffs I can find now to protect what little hearing I have left.

I apologize for getting a bit off your topic, but I do not know how much shooting glasses and/or hearing protecting are stressed in your country, and I just wanted to offer some suggestions for you.

Take care,

twoguns
 

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Gettin' old ain't for sissies.

One more thing about porting: if you're using a ported gun on the range ALWAYS check the range shed overhead for wasp nests. They may have gotten used to the firing but a blast of fumes and particles hitting the nest causes them to react with hostility.


Regards,

Pat
 
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I already have bad eyes: I always was short-sighted, but since about 3 years, I'm also far-sighted!!! It's nice to become old!!!
:(" title=":mad:" border="0"/> With my glasses, I can see the target, but no more the gun's sight, without them, it's the contary!

The whole problem is that in middle age the lenses of your eyes lose the ability to focus over widely varying distances. There's various solutions to this problem:

One is having your opthamologist determine a prescription for a set of glasses that focus just on the front sight. (Be sure that you clear bringing a handgun into his practice for the determination of which ahead of time, to avoid possible anxiety and panic among his staff). A cheaper solution is to go to a drug store that carries reading glasses in various strengths and pick a pair that allows the front sight to be in focus. Distance objects, like the target, won't be in focus but even when you had perfect (or perfectly-corrected with prescription glasses) vision, if you were correctly focusing on the front sight for a correct sight picture, the target wasn't in focus. Wal-Mart in my area has the best set-up of these in their pharmacy department. Again, you want to avoid taking a real handgun with you for this selection.

Another option is bifoculs with the near-focus portion of the eyeglass lenses ground to a prescription to focus on the front sight rather than for typical reading distances. Some have found that "reverse bifoculs" with the close-focusing part of the lens in the upper part of the lenses to be easier for handgun shooting.
 
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