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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone was talking about these in another thread, and I got to thinking about them.

When I look at this gun, I really have to ask why, other than for people that high-thumb, why the thumb safety was even kept. It already has a grip safety and DA trigger -- why complicate the process of getting it into action when that's already one safety more than most "experts" think is necessary?

Me, I'd be comfortable going with the thumb safety off, and a round in the chamber, but I'd probably engage the thumb safety, anyway. I'm already used to flipping it off during the draw with my Hi-Power, so why not?

How would you carry one of these?
 

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I own one of these and don't carry it. While the trigger is indeed smooth, it does take some learning and I never got comfortable enough with it. Now it sits in my safe. The thumb safety is indeed superfluous in my mind...I think it was retained to keep the looks and controls as much 1911-ish as possible. If I were to carry it or otherwise keep it close by at the ready, I would keep a round chambered and the safety off.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Someone was talking about these in another thread, and I got to thinking about them.

When I look at this gun, I really have to ask why, other than for people that high-thumb, why the thumb safety was even kept. It already has a grip safety and DA trigger -- why complicate the process of getting it into action when that's already one safety more than most "experts" think is necessary?
Because it is not a DA pistol. In fact, it is an SA pistol whose hammer can "release" from the internal cam and allow it to come forward..... but the cocking cam is still cocked.

A true DA has a long and heavy trigger pull to fire. The LDA has a VERY light take up stroke to move the hammer back followed by a sharp break of about 5# to fire.

IMO, it could easily have an AD through careless handling when drawing with the safety off.
 

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My response is more personal than a policy.

I am intimate with 1911 safeties so it just makes sense.

OTOH, it is not a heavy trigger pull that will prevent a negligent discharge on any weapon (we now know about involuntary convulsive reflex...a 50 lb trigger is not "safe" unless you know and obey proper trigger finger discipline) so I guess a mechanical safety is just one more thing that might save a problem if a mistake is made.

Jim
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had one once and it was a real lemon. Went back the to factory, but never worked right. I finally dumped it at a loss.
 
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