Handguns and Ammunition Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The more I shoot semiautos the more I still think the da revolver is the right gun for the average citizen.

I only have had to revolver stopages, one was with a very beaten M&P revolver in .38 spl that I got rid of it and the other was ammo related, the round was a factory 158 grains .357 mag that had a micro crack in the mouth and the bullet pulled upon firing and didn't allow the cilinder to rotate cause the bullet struck the forcing cone.

With semiautos autos mostly m1911a1 and some sa/da I have had mmmmm I lost the count.

Returning home for my trip to Mexico City the next week I'm taking home either one, a S&W M-10 snub in .38 spl or a Colt python .357 mag (loaded with .38 spl hps) as a home security gun.

Firsth I have to test the python cause the Trappers mainspring failes and broke, so I put againg the colt's factory mainspring, so a reability test must be conducted to see if the gun is 100% reliable.

Less rounds (then the semiauto) but more peace of mind, besides no levers to fight with, no stiff slides to rack (my wife hate this), no worries about a jam, etc,etc.

Manny
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,867 Posts
Hello, Manny. The revolver has many traits recognized over the decades that just flat make it appealing. I think you've hit on them. I've seen some mighty fast and might fine shooting done with revolvers and carry one daily in the form of a snub.

Best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
I am probably jinxed.

I think my first quality DA wheelgun was a S&W K-38.

I took it out to shoot it and on the second cylinder full the thing locked up tighter than a drum... I managed to get the 3rd shot off by forcing the hammer to full cock but that was it, it would not operate after that.

I beat the cylinder open with a rubber mallet and after scratching our heads (a shooting buddy was with me) I finally found that unbured powder was collected under the ejector - just a few flakes. Cleaned these out and the gun worked fine.

It was a big shock. I expected 100% reliablilty. It was downhill from there.

After adopting a .357 and using that for a few years I finally went to the .45 auto. At a later date after shooting over 100,000 rounds though one Govt. Model with 4 malfunctions, I obtained a wheel gun in .45 ACP. The reloads that my 1911 gobbled up with aplomb were constantly causing problems in my wheel gun and I learned right there that there were not "more reliable". I did finally learn to load for the revolver but it is less forgiving except for bullet shape and its effect on feeding. BTW that gun digested another 40K after I got the wheelgun without another malfunction until a friend dropped the slide on an empty chamber and broke the sear. I still have it today but it is semi-retired and I use it as a .45 Super.

Of course overall some examples of revolvers have been more reliable than some examples of autos. Perhaps, across the board, they are generally more reliable with factory loads (there are some really poor autos out there as there are poor wheelguns).

Either autos or wheelguns that malfunction don't tend to stay in my armory very long - at least not in that condition :)

As always, none of us have enough personal experience to be definitive and your experiences may be the opposite.

Onward,
Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
319 Posts
:::::: Less rounds (then the semiauto) but more peace of mind, besides no levers to fight with, no stiff slides to rack (my wife hate this), no worries about a jam, etc,etc. Manny
My mother feels the same way, and many years ago we set her up with an old Ruger Speed Six, loaded with Winchester 158 gr LSWC HP .38 Specials. This snubby revolver has been comforting to her, and us, ever since.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top