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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
... until today. Been busy and been slackin'. I've got no excuse.

So I went out to practice. I first shot the .22 rifle to make sure my "eye was on" then went to the pistol.

The only drill I fired today was relatively simple: Take two logs, stand them side by side on an old chair, turn, walk several paces ( = about 7yds), turn while drawing, assume Weaver stance, give left target one, right target one, go back to left (if still standing) and then back to right (if still standing).

But that's not the way it happened.

It was all good until the shooting. First target got a double tap followed by the second one.

I've not trained this way in two years. I have been training to give each target one before dishing out seconds.

I was fast- don't get me wrong. On the first shot the target spun on its way down and it caught a bullet crease right above the first bullet hole. The second target- well, I couldn't find the bullet holes. I know I hit it because it fell after two double taps.

I also noticed too much concentration on the threat. Also, when I transitioned I felt a lag. Not big, but kinda' like, bang bang, (1/4 sec), bang bang. Not good.

This isn't the best training method perhaps, but I use it because I never know if and when the logs will go down.

All will go away with renewed practice. But.... It concerns me that a method that I abandoned cropped back up after two years. I had practiced it for five.

I know that old habits die hard. However, I would very much like to bury this one and two years of intense practice has not done it.

Any suggestions on this, or any aspect of the admittedly simplistic training I did today?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Well, not really a suggestion, but why did you abandon the double tap technique? I can understand wanting to use a single shot placed well and then evaluate the situation. But I always thought a solid double tap and then evaluate was as effective?

I suspect the lag in transition from one target to the next will go away with more practice.

-Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
RandomMan,

I went to controlled pairs in favor of double tapping. More accurate in my opinion.

Josh <><
 
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The last time I went through MOUT training, I got a whole different definition of double tapping - you shoot the guy once, he's not dead when you walk by, so you shoot him again - a "double tap." I understand what is typically meant by a double tap, I'm merely passing on the different definition I heard in the shoot house at Benning.

I'm all for controlled pairs - they can be done extremely rapidly, and prove far more effective than one sorta halfway aimed shot followed by a second jerk of the pistol (or rifle.. or shotgun).

Josh, I do envy your ability to even setup such practice scenarios! Back home I'm limited to raising from the low ready, to the high ready and firing. I have to end up going to the MOUT site to do any serious training at Benning, and if I want to set up my own scenarios, I've gotta drive 8 hours to the ranch! Just keep the fundamentals sharp - we revert to the lowest common denomiator when the SHTF - just make sure it's on the money. Time to head to work.

Anthony
 
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