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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Stopped byt he local Gander Mt. yesterday for ammo, and I find a whole bunch of Savage Semiautos in the used case. I managed to pick up these two for a very resonable price.
1907 Model, high polish blue, .32 ACP:


1917 Model, matte blue, .32 ACP:


Feeling lucky now.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have several of these little Savage pocket autos. They are neat little handguns and have a standard of fit and finish quality that you can hardly find in a production handgun today, There were three models made from 1907 to 1928; the Model 1907, Model 1915 and Model 1917 (with some ovelap in production between the three models). The Model 1915 is uncommon to rare. Most were a high-polish blue, but some had a matte-blue finish. They are by far the most common in .32 ACP. All models in .380 ACP are simply enlarged, scaled-up versions of the same models in .32 ACP. There's almost no collector interest in them (yet) so you can accumulate a bunch for comparatively little $.

Many pre-war pocket autos like these (and many pre-war autopistols in general) are fascinating handguns in that they represent a period in small arms development when the world's arms manufacturers were falling all over themselves to develop practical autopistols for the military and civilian markets --- without stepping on each others patents. The results were some ingenious --- and impractical, even bizarre --- designs. (The little Savages used the force of the opposing torque exerted by the bullet as it was spun down the barrel by the rifling to rotationally unlock the action for cycling.)

Enjoy your little Savages.
They are fine little handguns, but be aware that there's not a lot of spare parts available for them so shoot them very, very sparingly.
 

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I keep looking at a number of those cute little .32s in a local gun store . . . the parts issue always worries me, though.
 
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