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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I have had a book for those new to carrying congealing in my mind for a while now. Here's how it will (preliminarily) go:

I Self Defense Overview

II Disparity of Force and Your Responsibility to Retreat

III Selection of Your Handgun

IV Selection of Accessories

V Train with Your Handgun and Accessories (before carrying)

VI Methods of Carry

VII Threat Assessment, Situational Awarness, and Color Coding

VIII What to Expect In a Fight for Your Life

IX The Aftermath: Courtroom Showdown

X Summary and Self-Assessment Test

There may be a chapter thrown in on hand-to-hand tactics as well. I may or may not include this in what is currently Chapter II. It depends on how much of it I figure someone can actually practice simply by reading. Certainly no fine motor skill techniques.

At any rate, this is something I want to write. I just don't know if it would be of any interest.

What I'm asking you to do is to think back to when you were first learning defensive shooting and ask yourself, "Would this have helped me (assuming good content)?"

The target market are those who get their permits and don't think about practice or taking a life; in other words, those who learn from Hollywood that there is nothing to it.

Thanks to those who choose to participate. No animosity will be felt against anyone who does not wish to give his or her input however.

Questions and anwers are welcome, as is constructive criticism.

Thank you again,

Josh <><
 
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When I got my first permit, Mn was not a shall-issue state. The class requrement was a DNR firearms cert... Not real good for carry. I found and went through a carry class so I would have a bit of knowledge available.

Every so often I end up lending books to friends for them to get an overview with.

And you have a great resorce here in you can pick the brains of many people if need be!

Steelheart
 

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It sounds like a combo of Chris Bird's Concealed Carry Manual, Ayoob's In The Gravest Extreme, and various books by Taylor, Suarez, Farnham, Cooper and Stanford.

I think Bird's book (on its third edition - given to everyone in our concealed carry class) does a good job of introducing a bit of all this material to a novice, and I think the others do a good job of bringing the speed up a bit (or a lot).

If you want to write it, you should - by all means. You should give the world what you have to offer, and I'd be interested in seeing what you have to say (I have a pretty decent library of firearms/defense books). But I don't think there's an unfilled need for such a book today.

If you were going to write such a book, I hope you'd purchase every available book on the subject and analyze what they cover, and then hit all the important stuff.
 

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Hi Mr. Smith,

I was thinking about your book idea when I got home tonight, so I pulled my copy of Chris Bird's The Concealed Handgun Manual from the shelf. Here are the chapter titles in his book:

1. Fighting back: Victim or survivor
2. Why carry a gun? The police can't protect you
3. School shootings: another point of view
4. Staying out of trouble: non-violent dispute resolution
5. Choosing a handgun: semi-automatics and revolvers
6. How to carry: holsters and other accessories
7. Avoiding accidents: safety and handling
8. Basic handgun shooting: watch the front sight
9. Advanced shooting: back up and move to cover
10. Winning a gunfight: mind-set and tactics
11. Deadly force: when to use it and what happens when you do.
12. Practice: your life depends on it
13. State concealed-handgun carry laws

It's a real similar topic range to what you're considering, although you could certainly cover the various chapters differently and in greater detail than Mr. Bird's book does. Not that I'm running down Mr. Bird's book, mind you: I think it's an excellent introductory work.

Anyway, while there might not be an unmet need in this arena, there's certainly room for one more good book!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello and thank you for the responses.

The outline has drifted a bit and it seems there will be a bit more content than originally planned. I'm up to five pages of outline and am not nearly done yet.

What I've done for myself is combine martial art techniques with firearms, and I intend this to cover the basics of that system as well. Even the basics will be extensive.

It may end up being an all inclusive book. I had to sit back and ask myself, "What do I really know?" Turns out that it's more than I expected.

I've not read any of the existing books for one reason: They put ideas in my head. I've set out to write fiction before and it resembles King, Koontz, Crichton, and a host of others waaaay to much.

I believe the ideas presented must be my own for the most part and be accepted or rejected. I will of course have to do research on criminal law as some of mine may be outdated, but I do believe that it will be an original.

We'll see how it turns out and I may test market it first by distributing it locally on consignment after printing it myself.

It's a bigger project than I thought, but well worth it I believe. If putting training a person saves even one life, it's worth it.

Thanks again,

Josh <><
 

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The legal aspect is tricky. The law is not clearly defined; it's evolving. I'm a criminal defense lawyer in New Mexico, and I guess I'm probably something of an expert on New Mexico criminal defense law - I might be qualified to write a book on self-defense law in this state. However, doing so would take me, an appllate lawyer who writes on the law for a living, a long time - and it would be only a snapshot of the law at the time I wrote it, and the law could change drastically the day after it was published. But, man, I really wouldn't want to try to write an all-things-to-all-jurisdictions book!

The problem is that things are just so case-specific, plus you will never know what the law will say about a particular case until the last appellate court is finished ruling on the case. Certainly it's possible to give guidelines to folks, but what I've found people always want is specifics: e.g. "There was this time that I was shooting with my friends out in the desert, and these other guys came along with guns, and one of them sort of pointed his rifle at us. I would have been justified in shooting him, right?" ::)

Now, I get this all the time from otherwise reasonable folks I know. And I try to give them straight and correct answers, but it always comes down to "I can't predict what the responding officer is going to do, what the prosecutor is going to do, what the grand jury is going to do, what the trial court is going to rule, what the jury will do, or what the appellate court will do. I can tell you that generally . . . " and then I try to tell them sort of the trend in the law in that area.

So, I'd encourage you to tread softly on the legal aspect of the book - be general and be accurate, and stress that no one can say what will happen legally until after it's all over. But if someone uses deadly force, he should expect to have profound legal problems for a good period of time (as former clients of mine - who were eventually completely cleared - can attest). :-[
 

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Josh;
By all means. To be sure there are a number of good books on this topic but that does not mean you should not write one. There are a number of good reasons that you should.

1. In a manner of speaking, writing a book is teaching. Those that would learn should teach. It causes us to research, organize and think deeply about a topic we are interested in.

2. No matter how many books there are out there you will come to this with your own individualistic point of view. While there are great similarities between the ture experts there are also minor differences. Most of us read everything we can get our hands on. I call it "mining for nuggets of wisdom". None of us knows it all.

3. Someone who knows nothing about this topic and has no idea where to start may run into your book by chance and that might be his only exposure or it may spark an interest and cause him to seek even more information.

So, by all means, for yourself and for the public good, have at it!

I would agree with Erich, avoid the technicaly legal aspects or at least giving interpretations except for those that are clear cut (like quoting requirements for a permit). There is plenty to cover and you have a good plan in mind.

Good luck!!!
Jim
 
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