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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had been looking for a 3"re S&W, either M610 or M686, but this 610-2 4" came along and decided to go for it. It has been modified to accept moon clip loads by roll-chamfering and polishing the chambers; the front sight is fiber-optic and the grips are fancy pau ferro wood Hogues. It came with a bunch of moon clips and moonclip carriers as well as a demooner tool and a Talon Tactical Kydex holster and a handful of .40 ammo - all for a little less than $600. I think I'll keep it for a while, and maybe use it as a trade incentive for the 3"er I'm looking for. Here are couple of pictures:



 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oldfella,

Welcome to S&W "N"-frames! My first 'Smith was a "K"-frame, but the majority have been older(pinned & recessed) "N"-frames. They are a source of joy. Unfortunately, I got rid of a number of these a few years ago and currently have two big bore revolvers. A Colt Anaconda 4" .44 mag and a S&W M57 4" in .41 mag.

Why the interest in a 3" N-frame? They look racey, but buck and snort considerably more than their 4" brethren.
Like you M610 very much. I'm not a big fan of unflutted cylinders, but they look good on your platform.

Interstingly enough, the Colt Anaconda is very similar in size to the N-frame. Close enough to where they use the same speedloader!

I've rambled enough. Enjoy your new revolver.

By the way, who made the grips on your gun. Sure are purty...

Wes
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, Wes - The grips are Hogue, pau ferro. I like the hard-to-get 3" Smiths. I now have a 681 Performance Center, 7-shot, and a 696 .44 Special - only 200 were made of each of these two guns. Both these guns are a joy to shoot, and very accurate. Regards.

Pete (The Oldfella)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oldfella,

Congratulations. That's a very nice looking beast ya' got there.

610s "require" moonclips as they come from the factory, however. I put quotes around require because my 625 also needs them, but only to make the extractor work. You can shoot a 625 all day without moonclips, you just have to rely on gravity and fingernails for extraction.

You might want to check whether the same is true for the 610 -- if you don't like moonclips, that is. Also RIMZ sells polymer clips that are very easy to load/unload w/o a tool.

Let us know how she shoots!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maxer - Thanks for the tip on the RIMZ moon clips for my M610; I've just ordered a pack of 10.

Pete
 

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3,867 Posts
Hello and congratulations on your N-frame, Oldfella. Like many others here, the N-frame S&W's are "special" revolvers
to me, too.

Not my most used S&W's, they remain my favorites.

Best.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you sir - as I've said elsewhere, I used to be a semi auto fella, but my old, weak hands ca no longer handle the slide, so I converted to revolvers - now I'm trying to collect a few hard-t-get 3"ers to leave to my young one when I kaput. This particular one is not yet a collector's item, but it sure is a range gun, especially in the .40 Cal. mode. Regards.

Pete (The Oldfella)
 

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N Frames at Leland's house:

M28 Highway Patrolman, 4"
M28 Highway Patrolman, 6"
M520, .357 (made for NYSP)
M29-5, 6"
M29-2, 4"
M29-2, 6.5"
M29-2, 8.375"
M24-3, 6.5"
M57, 4" blue
M57, 4" nickel
M58, S-series
M25-5, 6" .45 Colt
M625 Mountain Gun, .45 Colt
M625 .45 ACP
My uncle's WWII service revolver, a M1917 that left the factory in June of 1918.

Sheesh, either I 'em too, or they've been multiplying behind my back.

That one looks like a winner, Oldfella. I've never fired the 10mm in a revolver, but I bet it's going to be fun!
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi, LelandRay - I must say, you have been busy squirreling a few; I'd like to do the same with the 3" variety - like the 610 3" and the 686CS-1 3"... although the last one is an L- Frame. I've never shot my 610 in the 10mm mode, just the .40 Cal. - a joy to shoot.
 

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A friend of mine bought a 646 .40 S&W, which has a steel frame and titanium cylinder. It shoots really well, but he's not shooting it much because it's something of a rare bird, with only about 900 manufactured.

I have become particularly fond of the .357 guns, partly because they're just so purty, and partly because they're much more pleasant to shoot with full charge loads than my two M66s. Both of them are short barrelled pieces, so they're more for carrying than for shooting a bunch.

The really FUN ones to shoot are the .45 ACP and .45 Colt guns; maybe next time around you could find yourself a 3-inch .45?
 

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As a personal follow-up to Ray's comment, the only thing you will regret about owning the venerable Model 29 is the day you sold it in a moment of weakness!
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Some of you may remember when Bunkie Hunt tried to corner the silver market. I think Leland's cornered the N Frame market. Now I know why they're so danged hard to find around here.

One thing that gets me is how heavy they feel until you start shooting them. Once the lead starts flying, they feel just right to me. My latest addition, is a 4-inch 625.

Actually it's more than that. In the past week I acquired a Glock 19, a 325 PD ("tiny" N Frame), and the aforementioned 4-incher. I also traded off a Colt Gunsite Pistol. I've never bought this many guns at one time before. I'm giddy now. (Maybe I was giddy then?)

The G19, Old Fella, is now my only pistol, and I have no intention of ever buying another semiauto. For me, revolvers are more interesting, less expensive, less traumatic to shoot, more fun, and I shoot them better. And with moonclips I can reload almost as fast as I can a semiauto so they make sense for personal defense. Of course, six outght to be enough anyway, but you never know...
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Some time it takes a little longer... to figure out the advantages of revolver, vs. semi-auto. Like Maxer says - one of the advantages is the love, the attachment, the feel, the thrill of owning and shooting these beauties... the .44, as in M696; the .40/10mm, like in M610; the smoothness, as in M681PC (357/38), and so-on. the only disadvantage is going broke buying these beauties. :-/
 

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You know, Oldfella, the L frame 681 went into service with the NYSP to replace the Model 520, which was never delivered in any great quantity. I had a 681, but when I realized I'd have the chance to get a 520 new in the box, the 681 got sold.

Shooting or even handling the 520 is very similar to using one of the real old classics like the Model 20 (38/44 Heavy Duty in a previous incarnation).



Those Don Collins grips and Tyler adapter used to reside on this Model 29-2, shown with its little brother, the Model 57 .41 Magnum.



PS: I resemble this remark: "I think Leland's cornered the N Frame market. Now I know why they're so danged hard to find around here."

Where's "around here"? Me, I have just a smattering of N frames. Compared to some of the folks I've run up on, my little collection looks like a few grains of sand on a very large beach.

And I'm divesting myself of a couple soon due to medical expenses and the simple fact that there are some pieces that I don't shoot much, if at all.
 
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