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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just about to buy another .38 snubbie when I spotted a new Kahr CW9 for about $350.00. I own a PM9 and like it a lot.

The CW9 is a 7-shot, less expensive version of the P9 which has the 3.5" barrel and weighs about 16 ounces. The trigger was nice, I was a bit surprised.

The CW9 has conventional rifling compared to the P9's match-grad polygonal rifling. I guess that's the most crucial difference.
Other than that it has less machining.

There is a $200 price difference in these two pistols.

Does anyone know how big a deal the match grade rifling makes?

I'm going through a revolver/snub phase, but I'm wondering if this might be more practical as a convenient, lightweight car pistol.

Thanks so much.
 

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I can't tell you that I've experienced the difference between the conventional rifling and the polygonal "rifling", but the increased velocity provided by the polygonal barrels sure makes me happy with my P9 Covert.

I don't know what I'd do for a dedicated "car gun" (probably get something surplus like a 6906 for less than either Kahr), but I've reached a point in my life where I like paying a bit extra to get a "better" product.

Anyway, that might not be of any help to you in your dilemma, but it constitutes my thoughts on the matter. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know what you mean Erich. Still I've seen some used guns (not a 6906) for more than this little new Kahr. Presently I have a Springfield XD 9 in my car, it's just a little heavy to pop in a pocket. I'm just puzzled aobut that polygonal barrel.
 
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You're worried about match grade accuracy in a gun expressly designed for concealed carry?

Do you think that you'll be able to shoot with match grade accuracy in a defensive situation?

Think it over, then make your decision.
 

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Hello. The polygonal-rifled bbls do offer a bit more velocity much of the time, but the fit of the bbl to the slide will most likely have more effect on accuracy. I would pick the model I personally liked the best and go with that. Either pistol should have pretty good mechanical accuracy based on past experiences with Kahr and more than is necessary for quick and dirty "serious" needs.

Unless weight is an overriding concern, I'd personally go with the original K9, all-steel pistols. Though I owned but one P9, it simply was not reliable with +P ammunition. The slide would lock back with rounds still in the magazine. Hopefully this has been corrected as mine was an early P9. Kahr sent a new slide stop but no improvement. The manner in which the downward spring tension is applied to the K9 and the P9 is different...or at least was in the guns I owned. This may have changed but I've not examined a P9 in a year or two so I cannot say for sure.

I have seen the polymer Kahrs that worked fine on the range but have also seen a couple that did precisely what mine did.

Best and good luck.
 

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My experience with Kahrs either steel or plastic has been unfavorable. I have not seen one that worked reliably. My P9 went back twice and never worked with anything. People keep telling me that they have one that works but I never have actually witnessed it at the IDPA BUG matches.

Polygonal rifling has to do with the shape of the lands and groves. I have never seen any accuracy differences. Glock is the premier poly barreled guns and they are accurate as combat type guns if not for match grade stuff. They shoot better than I can hold.
 

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Adguy, another reason for the price difference between the CW9 vs. the P9 is that from the factory the former only comes with ONE magazine, while the latter has two. Spare mags for the Kahrs are up to what, $30-$35 each now?

Fwiw I have a K9 and a P9. The K gets most of the range time, the P gets carried more than shot.
 
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