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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love revolvers. I love everything about revolvers except their capacity, but even that can be mitigated.

I'm very, very torn. I'm a young guy and getting ready to buy the first gun all over again (first was a Kahr Arms PM9 that was stolen). A big part of me wants the 3" GP100, a big part of me wants the 3" Springfield XD9 Subcompact. I know I will own a .357 and a 9mm in some order at some point in my life because I love both rounds, but the question is which comes first...

My thinking is that I'll either own a full size .357 (4" GP100 or maybe a 686+) and a compact 9mm (XD9SC), or a full size 9mm (think BHP) and a compact .357 (the 3" GP100 in question).

The idea is to carry either weapon in every day here in Texas.

Your advice and opinions are VERY welcome.
 

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Hello.

I love revolvers. I love everything about revolvers except their capacity, but even that can be mitigated.Like yourself, many of us like and enjoy shooting/carry revolvers. While their low ammo capacity compared to the auto is a bit lacking, I think that for the majority of defense situations encountered by non-LEO, they have proved adequate. I've never heard of anyone wishing that they had had less ammo in a deadly force scenario, but things are usually pretty well decided in the first few shots and seconds. Of course, that is not too comforting should you be the fellow who encounters the situation in which an abnormal amount of shooting is necessary.
With regard to this area of concern, I guess you have to decide whether you value capacity over the attributes of the revolver to the degree that you just wouldn't be happy with a handgun holding a relatively low number of rounds between loadings.


I'm very, very torn. I'm a young guy and getting ready to buy the first gun all over again (first was a Kahr Arms PM9 that was stolen). A big part of me wants the 3" GP100, a big part of me wants the 3" Springfield XD9 Subcompact. I know I will own a .357 and a 9mm in some order at some point in my life because I love both rounds, but the question is which comes first...I am a big fan of the GP100 but these are not the easiest handguns to conceal, particularly in warmer climates. The XD9 SC would hold more shots and be a lighter, smaller package.

My thinking is that I'll either own a full size .357 (4" GP100 or maybe a 686+) and a compact 9mm (XD9SC), or a full size 9mm (think BHP) and a compact .357 (the 3" GP100 in question).

The idea is to carry either weapon in every day here in Texas.I, too am in Texas and of the guns you mention, I think you'd find the XD9 SC to be easier to conceal. Though you cut down capacity by one round, Ruger's SP101 is a pretty darned good revolver in my view and one I frequently tote concealed.

Good luck, welcome to the site and best to you and yours.
 

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Howdy Mr. Craigo,

Welcome to the site too sir. I think Mr. Camp offered a very thoughtful response that would be hard to equal. So I won't try.

I will just throw out a couple of thoughts for you to play with. You state you are bascially a revolver man and wish to carry the handgun daily. Based strickly on that, I would suggest you start off with a revolver, as that is the platform you seem to be the most familiar/comfortable with. That will give you a carry weapon that does not require much hands on to be comfortable with the manual of arms with.

I do think Ruger makes some excellent revolvers, and carried an issued SR737, .357 mag round butt, as my issued weapon for a bit over a year, before that federal agency elected to allow personal 9mm pistols. At that point I opted to carry a Smith pistol I already owned that more than doubled my round capacity and offered a faster reload. But again as Mr. Camp noted, this was a LEO handgun situation, which does add other factors to the mix in my view.

I was impressed with how strong and well made the Ruger 737 was, but to be candid in a revolver I am simply a Smith man. Personally I would suggest you take a long hard look at a pre-lock J frame or a 3" model 65 type revolver (13 or 65 in 357 mag, and 10 or 64 in 38 spc). I managed to find a really nice 3" RB model 65 that I am looking forward to shooting shortly when I get some rounds loaded up for it.

Once you have a revolver you are comfortable with and are carrying daily, then you can consider a pistol for you to acquire. That gives you plenty of range time hands-on with that platform to get comfortable with a less familiar manual of arms, while still allowing you to carry your revolver daily. You might also consider obtaining the pistol in either 357 Sig or 40, and then obtaining the 9mm down/conversion barrel for it. I have multiple barrels for my Sig P226R and 229, my FN HP 40, and still need to have the 357 Sig Bar-Sto barrel fitted to my CZ 75B in 40. But to me there is a lot to be said for owning one pistol, like my P226R that allows me to own one pistol and fire all 3 calibers simply by changing out the barrel. Just something else for you to consider sir.

Once you have made you decision and purchased a handgun, please give us a range report on it once you have been able to fire it. Good luck. If you have additional questions, please ask them. To me that is one of the real benefits of an excellent site like this one. Members can share their experiences with other members and offer new thoughts to consider.

twoguns
 

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Craig, here's the deal:
You love revolvers and it doesn't matter one iota what others think or like. It is YOUR money and will be YOUR gun. Get what YOU want. If it is a revolver, all the better because that is what YOU like. If it is a semi-auto; that's good too. I will bet that whatever you buy will only be the first of many guns, revolvers and semis, that you will own and enjoy in a hopefully long and happy lifetime.



Typo corrected.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know I'll love either in the end... half the fun is to agonize over the decision ::) The good news is I'm living in the college dorms until next semester, so I'm not in a tremendous hurry.

I don't know what it is about revolvers that gets me... probably the class and charm (and perhaps a little ol' thing called the .357 magnum). Perhaps something more "carriable" like a slim 9mm might be sensible for the Spring and Summer (which would coincide nicely with my new residence and purchase), followed by a 4" GP100 in blue for sweatshirt and jacket weather


Who knows, I might just save enough money to put the BHP back on the table (and wouldn't THAT make my Christmas!).

Thanks guys.
 

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Personally, as a matter of taste, I LOVE wheelguns!

I recognize, and have for 40 years, that autos have some advantages. That does not make revolvers useless!

I own and carry both, though I admit I would no longer ever carry just one gun. Seen way too many wierd things happen.

Buy them both, carry them both!!!!!

Jim H.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was very much like you. I started out with the wheelguns and that was what I mostly owned and shot. But, like many, I thought an auto was a better choice for concealed carry. So for many years my carry gun was a Colt Commander in .45acp.
Then one day it dawned on me that I truely am a wheelgunner at heart. I'm simply more comfortable with a revolver and I shoot them well. So I found myself a good used 3" S&W Model 13.
While I do still carry a 1911 from time to time, more often than not these days you'll find the Model 13 on my hip. It just suits me better.

The question you need to be asking yourself is which gun are you more comfortable with?
 

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That is a good question, bearing in mind the Clint Smith dictim: "A gun should be comforting not comfortable" but I think that is really what you meant there grayfox


That is the reason behind my simple marksmanship drills. I wanted to take the subjectivity out. I want to carry the gun I am most effective with and the only way to figure that out is to shoot it for score (so long as the test is relevant to self defense).

I keep the tests simple because people wont do them if they are hard to do.

The easiest is to use set up a target (any target because your group size is what will count), and from the low ready fire 5 shots as fast as you can hit accurately. Time the shots to the 5th round. Add one second for every shot that is outside a 5" group.

Your score is your time (note that this does not make speed more important than accuracy due to the penalty). I would probably make some adjustments for power but I avoid doing that for eveyone else because there is so much debate on how to measure it. Still it is obvious that performing the drill with a .22 is not as effective as a .44 magnum (considering the hits are required and a miss automatically results in severe penalties).

This is not about competition, it is about how *you* do with one gun compared to another.

Good luck!

Jim H.
 

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Looking at the quality responses, once again I'm convinced that this is the best forum on the internet for such questions.

My meager contribution - I write few words -> shoot both revolvers and autos. If you have a good range nearby you'll have access to both. See what you like.
 

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Hello. As was just said by nbender and abninftr and others, go with what you feel best with and prefer. Once you have made the decision, practice. Get good and be competent with your choice. If down the road you change your mind, no problem. Save and buy the one you believe is more suitable and then learn to use it well.

The autoloader has its own set of both advantages and disadvantages...as does the revolver. Neither is perfect in all aspects but neither is by any means useless in my opinion. While I honestly still believe that we solve our problem in the first few shots or are no longer caring about it, I have never ever visited with gunfight survivors who said that they wished they had less ammo on hand when the balloon went up.

Above all, whatever type turns out to be right for you, learn to use it well.

With time and exposure, you might find that you like both and see a specific use for both.

Best and good luck in your search.
 

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+1 to the SP 101! Outstanding compact revolver (certainly a belt gun, a bit heavy for pocket carry). Accurate, heavy enough to practice with full power .357 rounds, easy yo use with the FBI load.

If you get queasy about the capacity, then save a bit and buy a Glock 19 next, probably the best all round fighting handgun out there.


My SP 101 and my G19 are what I'll carry if we have to pull out from Galveston next week
 

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Back when I was a kid autoloaders were called "jamamatics" and Cops carried wheelguns.
When I began my LEO career I started with a wheelgun and argued against the switch to the "jamamatic". Now I qualify yearly with an autoloader, and even own two of my own, but my preference is for a wheelgun. Off-Duty I carry an N-Frame Thunder Ranch Revolver and a J-Frame as a BUG.
I find that Revolvers are easier shooting and more accurrate. I've shot some IDPA with my Glock, but don't find it to shoot as well for me as the round thing. I too like/love the wheelie. In a self defense situation I think you are well served with a wheelgun, and I find them easier to hide due to the "curves" and shape over a square autoloader.
I do sometimes wish the capacity was greater, but that can be mitigated somewhat by carrying a BUG. If you are in Texas you know about heat and summer clothing. People are amazed at what I carry, I'm not a "big" guy. It's just that I select the "appropriate" clothing and use a good gunbelt and holster. I prefer IWB. I also made my revolver more "concealable" by changing the stocks. I use the Eagle "Secret Sevice" stocks on my N-Frame for more "concealability". You will be amazed at what you can hide with the proper gear.
I find revolvers more accurrate, easier to hide and much more fun to shoot.
There is nothing wrong with a good "bottomfeeder" but I just don't think I need fifteen rounds in any Off-Duty self defense encounter I may run in to. I've also found that people that started shooting with revolvers tend to be more accurrate than those that started on "Hi-Cap" 9mm's. This is a generalization I realize, but one I've run in to an awful lot.
OK, it's late and I have to go to bed. Goodnight and stay safe.

Biker
 
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