Handguns and Ammunition Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What on earth is wrong with the ammunition companies of the United States?

Charco, (Charter Arms) Freedom Arms and NAA, are ALL offering new handguns in .32 H&R Magnum. Marlin is offering a rifle in .32 Magnum as well.

Why are Olin, Remington and others ignoring his fact? Are they simply "dinosaurs" or are they just recalcitrant? ???

Can anyone help in this asessment?

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,399 Posts
Hi there,

I am sure that it has to do with law of economic "supply and demand".

Charco, NAA, and Freedom Arms manufacture firearms for a "niche" market in self defense.

There are just too many other caliber choices available today with a cross over in ballistics. The average gun buyer cares little for K.E., velocity and bullet styles. They are simply going to buy the more common "over the counter" calibers, i.e. the .38 special.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
quickest $400 I ever lost was with a NAA .32NAA pistol that only used Corbon ammo. Nobody else made ammo for it and when I contacted Rem and Win by e-mail, both said they had no plans to make .32NAA ammo. The stuff was loud, bad recoil, and poor terminal ballistics. Had FTE's all the time.
So I can't blame the big three ammo companies if they don't want to make somebody's new "magic bullet" ammo. For me, I'll stick with the time proven calibers.
FWIW,
og
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
oldgranpa:

How is the .32 H&R Magnum an unproven cartridge? It has been proving itself since 1984.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Scott,

I believe OG is just pointing out that when it comes to new calibers, ammunition companies are reluctant to start producing ammo. With good reason, in my opinion there are a great many "flopped" handgun cartridges out there, it makes sense to be careful where you risk your money. While I'm not suggesting the .32 H&R Magnum is a "flopped" round, it is a niche round. When you're a large volume big dollar business, your job is to make investors money, not fill niche markets.

In terms of handgunning we find that the clearly profitable markets are going to be respected, revered, and long time calibers. 9mm, .357 Magnum, .38 Special, .45 ACP are probably the biggest ammo sellers. The .40 S&W has experienced a boom that has made it a great seller as well. It is interesting to note though, that ammo makers who work in the niche market make very little money from the "major calibers". The market isn't there for a niche 9x19 round, but it's there for a niche .32 H&R Magnum.

It is the unfortunate side effect of being in our capitalist society. The fortunate side effect is that small business will always be there to cater to niche markets. Much like your mention of Double Tap Ammo and 10mm in your signature line! Small business, niche market, and money can be made. When you're a big business, it's simply more difficult to move on markets that aren't clearly profitable.

-Rob
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No offense taken, whatsoever! I just want to see the most advanced products in the world employed by the "good guys".

Scott
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The .32 mag came out running strong loaded in strong full size revolvers like the 5.5 inch Ruger I had, then a cheap import snubby hit the market and promptly started blowing up cylinders. Federal the only factory loading I am aware of who never has been known for pushing the envelope, promply responded by downloading the ammo. Which basically killed the round. Not sure what the original goal of the round was but it seems like if loaded to it's potential could give Jframe shooters 38spl power but picking up that 6th shot. The 32 mag was my first pistol reloading adventure and first defensive handgun come to think of it was the first handgun I purchased. Ruger single action .32mag I truely regret selling it. I cant remember excact details but the 85gr XTP over a full charge of Bluedot or HS6 pentrated and expanded just fine. Not sure what it would do in a snubby.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,132 Posts
Hi there gunfan and others.

Thanks for the interesting discussion. Since my household now has a .32 H&R mag revolver I have also come to lament the lack of choice beyond Federal's 85gr. JHP and 95gr. lrn bullets. I appreciate the points made about "niche" marketing ammo, etc. It would seem that LE use would also be a boon to market share too? I mean, wouldn't .357 be a niche ctdg if it weren't used by Texas DPS and some others who anticipate gunfights in and around vehicles? I don't want to grouse (well, OK, not too much anyway), but when one sees ammo companies moving away from the .380/.38 spl/9mm "minimum standard" to include defensive .32 acp ammo (I'm thinking of Corbon here!) one can be forgiven a "harumph" or two? As I've said elsewhere, there is a catch .22 (or better, a "Catch .32") where the guns are being made, but won't sell too well without more ammo choices and so on.

I would ask fans of the .32 who know more of the history of the ctdg if defensive use of the H&R mag is a fairly recent/novel development in light of the points raised about the first revolvers that chambered it?

Just another two cents from a .38spl and 9mm shooter!
Cheers,
D.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top