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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Gents,

Yesterday I hurt myself while playing with my black lab. More precisely, I severely sprained my friggin' foot to the point the doctor thought it was broken, until the X-rays came back. (It probably didn't help that I waited for five hours to go in, and had grabbed a hiking stick and was walking on the one part that didn't hurt - likely made it swell more).

Anyway... btt, while I'm sitting here in bed getting the courage up to try it:

I realized that I have a fairly unique set of circumstances here. I'm supposed to be using crutches for a few days and I'm carrying a couple handguns. One is on my strong (left) side, and is a full-sized service auto. The other is a snubbie in my weak side pocket.

The crutches are in the way of both.

Mostly I've been using a cane I have laying around, but I can't do more than hobble around with either cane or crutch, so I'd have to make a stand if confronted (and, I figure that, using a cane or crutch, my chances of being at least "interviewed" have gone up 2-4 times. I also cannot use most H2H moves I was taught.)

Sooo, what, if any, shooting drills to you have laying around for someone who's a bit lamed up? Keep in mind that if I don't have a cane, I can't move, and the cane is on my STRONG side.

It was dark when I got home last night and I pulled my snubby on a racoon 7yds or so away, raiding the trash, fired, and missed wiht the first shot when I stumbled a bit. I figure if that's the best I can do I'm hurtin'.

So, excercises and practice runs (or hobbles) gents?

Thanks,

Josh <><
 

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Some Dr's will tell you ice packs on your foot. That never worked for me with sprains. I always used heat. Those "thermo" heat packs (whatever the correct name is) you get at WalMart work best for me.
Hope your foot gets better real soon.
og....I'm no doctor but "I stayed at a Holiday Inn last night" ::)
 

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Mr. Josh,

My best suggestion is if you are only going to be laid up on crutched for a few days - simple. Stay away from any situations that might require you to respond to them, until you are off the crutches. Probably not what you want to hear, but truly the best response.

But since I have noted you tend to be like most of us and a bit determined about things, ok try this ::).

Using the crutches, leave them under both armpits with some amount of weight on both to keep them up. Use a two hand normal grip as best as you can - but it will not be a normal grip. If you insist on taking a normal grip with arms fully extended, my prediction is both crutches will immediately hit the ground and there you are either stumbling or falling with a loaded handgun - not a good scenario. ::)

Or, accept you will lose the right crutch and practice shooting weak handed only. This would work for either crutches or the cane, as you have already noted the cane is on your strong side (left). Again not truly an ideal scenario for self-defense situations. Becoming proficient with weak hand only shooting, in my opinion, does require some serious work - especially with a J frame sized weapon, or a Beretta 92 sized weapon for that matter (your two basic handguns). It is simply not a skill that will be developed to a self-defense level in the space of a couple of days Josh. :(

Both bring me back to my original suggestion - just stay out of situations that might require any type of self-defense until you are no longer lame. ;)

Mr. OG does make an excellent suggestion on the hot/cold packs too. Over the years I have dealt with numerious sprains, strains, broken items, and surgeries.

When I had right shoulder surgery in 2000 (my strong side), during therapy a part of that involved me shooting my duty weapons. Fortunately for all concerned, my shooting was done on my own, no live rounds allowed around my "physical terrorists" as I affectionately called the ladies. (They did have me putting on an OWB holster, and practicing my drawing skills with an unloaded pistol as part of my on-site therapy. That was a hoot, I was in my late 40s, and probably their youngest patient. The unit was in an assisted living facility, and most of their other patients thought it was neat they had the chance to watch a cop practice drawing his weapon. I guess their tv channel selections must have left a lot to be desired
)

Oh man were my targets ugly initially, let me tell you. But with therapy, practice and patience, things began to look normal again.

But I used the hot/cold packs a lot after either therapy or range sessions on my shoulder. If one temp did not do much for me, I would simply revert to the other temp. I found that by alternating both, combined they did give me some needed relief. I also felt using them was far superior to popping a pain pill - which I had to use period.

Simple to use. For cold temps, you throw the pac in the freezer for the noted time frame. For hot temps, you throw the same pac in the microwave for the designated time and settings.

twoguns (also not a doc and did NOT sleep at the Holiday Inn last night. Shucks, I don't even play one on tv either
. But you asked so I offered ::) Since you noted you missed a **** at 7 yards, I think that speaks highly for my first suggestion too. ;) )
 
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I'm pretty sure you use a Taurus M9 Clone, right? That means it's DA. Put together a shoestring holster and carry it crossdraw, until you're better. With you hunched over the crutches, your shirt will drape down to cover it, when you're standing. If you've got a straight drop holster around, you can use that, too; just be sure you've got plenty of shirttail, if it's OWB.

I'm a big advocate of same gun, same place, all the time, but honestly folks; don't get so locked into one mode of carry that a simple solution like this one escapes you!

And while we're on the subject, straight-drop holsters are wonderful.

Now, as to what to do once you've gotten a hand on your gun, try this: Take a knee. Just drop down, and place the knee of your bad leg on the ground.

You sure as heck can't run away, so do this to make yourself a smaller target, and provide yourself a stable shooting platform.

Oh, and one last thing: don't run out of milk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you gents. I get some of the best answers on this board.

Twoguns... Yeah, I'm a bit "determined" though I'm making myself sit here and do homework tonight. The most walking I'm doing is out to the kitchen and back - about 50yds total, and I'm not carrying a pistol on me, which is unique for me.

Chubbypigeon, what is this "shoestring holster" you speak of, and how does one make it?

OG, Dad was in sports medicine and taught me most of what I know. However, I learned to take care of hurts in H2H training as well (once I went through practice with a sliced finger that wouldn't stop bleeding. That was interesting). It all jives with what you're saying, and there's a bit more I do, as long as I can stand the boredom. I thank you sir for your concern.

Thanks all, keep 'em coming!

Josh <><
 
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Shoestring holster is basically a way to keep a (and I must be vehement when I say this, so it will be in caps) GUN THAT IS SAFE FOR HOLSTERLESS CARRY, such as a DA auto, from sliding down into your pants, as you move about during the day.

Take a shoestring from a pair of shoes you don't wear, anymore. Tie the ends together, and then pull the loop out lengthwise, Tie a loop into either end of the lengthwise loop, leaving just enough space between the two loops to fit your gun in the resulting middle loop, up past the trigger guard, to the gripframe. Slide the two outside loops around your belt, and then put the gun through the middle loop, and down your waistband. You'll have to keep your belt cinched up pretty tight to get any kind of stability, but it's better than just jamming into your waistband, since the gun won't be able to slide down your pants.

Oh, and any time you do holsterless carry, make sure the muzzle is somewhere where it's NOT aimed at any of your reproductive equipment, or your femoral artery. People have carried like this safely for years with no problems, but I say don't tempt fate.
 
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