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Hello,

Nice find!

Yours appears to be a "b" suffix pistol, the last series of pistols made by the Germans during the Occupation of Belgium. These were produced from January 1944 to (officially) August 1944 in a serial number range from 1b to 61800b. Assuming production output was the same each day, you could do the math to reach an approximate date. It is said that few were produced after May, 1944. It is possible (doing similar math) that yours could have been produced in March or April, 1944.

These are thought to be the least shoot-able of any of the Occupation pistols. Materials were scarce, production was hurried and the Belgian "forced labor" less motivated to produce a fine pistol and more inclined to sabotage.

If you do intend to shoot it on occasion, you should replace all of the springs ESPECIALLY THE SEAR SPRING and the recoil spring guide rod. I also replaced the SEAR on my 1943... it appeared to be in rough shape.

Mine came to me with a very light trigger at 2.5#s and exhibited hammer follow. This would have been very dangerous to shoot, for any High Power. Replacing the sear spring brought it back to an acceptable 5# or so pull.

The recoil spring guide rod should be considered to be a museum piece. There are internal parts that have worn out and cannot be replaced. Mine works well with an FN original style Guide Rod. The BHSS Buffered Guide Rod (which I happily use in other High Powers) will not fit properly in mine. The Guide Rod is a disposable part due to a non replaceable spring and ball bearing. A new design, which would last forever, is now available from BHSS and I have not purchased one yet. I will pick up a couple at some point.

Seek an expert High Power smith if you cannot do this work yourself.

Mine ( the 1943) came with walnut grips of poor quality. They were soft, dry and crumbling. To shoot the pistol I fitted it with black plastic checkered grips purchased at Numrich. Pretty inexpensive, but they fit without modifications and they look similar to the dark brown Bakelite grips used at the end of Occupation. I have archived all of the original parts for posterity.


Cheers,

Tim


My 1943 "a" suffix as I found her:
Revolver Photograph Handwriting Air gun Trigger



Illustration of SEAR SPRINGS:
You can see by the shadows of the curve how the 1943 spring has flattened and is no longer usable. Even the stock 1989 spring is losing its spring with age.
The NEW one fits beautifully with this and all High Powers, no matter their age.
The original sear is pretty rough, easier to see in close-ups.
Tool Font Auto part Composite material Wood



Some original parts:
The grips are soft, dry and crumbling.
The original Guide Rod with the slotted end cap.
Office equipment Wood Rectangle Air gun Font
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello,

Nice find!

Yours appears to be a "b" suffix pistol, the last series of pistols made by the Germans during the Occupation of Belgium. These were produced from January 1944 to (officially) August 1944 in a serial number range from 1b to 61800b. Assuming production output was the same each day, you could do the math to reach an approximate date. It is said that few were produced after May, 1944. It is possible (doing similar math) that yours could have been produced in March or April, 1944.

These are thought to be the least shoot-able of any of the Occupation pistols. Materials were scarce, production was hurried and the Belgian "forced labor" less motivated to produce a fine pistol and more inclined to sabotage.

If you do intend to shoot it on occasion, you should replace all of the springs ESPECIALLY THE SEAR SPRING and the recoil spring guide rod. I also replaced the SEAR on my 1943... it appeared to be in rough shape.

Mine came to me with a very light trigger at 2.5#s and exhibited hammer follow. This would have been very dangerous to shoot, for any High Power. Replacing the sear spring brought it back to an acceptable 5# or so pull.

The recoil spring guide rod should be considered to be a museum piece. There are internal parts that have worn out and cannot be replaced. Mine works well with an FN original style Guide Rod. The BHSS Buffered Guide Rod (which I happily use in other High Powers) will not fit properly in mine. The Guide Rod is a disposable part due to a non replaceable spring and ball bearing. A new design, which would last forever, is now available from BHSS and I have not purchased one yet. I will pick up a couple at some point.

Seek an expert High Power smith if you cannot do this work yourself.

Mine ( the 1943) came with walnut grips of poor quality. They were soft, dry and crumbling. To shoot the pistol I fitted it with black plastic checkered grips purchased at Numrich. Pretty inexpensive, but they fit without modifications and they look similar to the dark brown Bakelite grips used at the end of Occupation. I have archived all of the original parts for posterity.


Cheers,

Tim


My 1943 "a" suffix as I found her:
View attachment 4455


Illustration of SEAR SPRINGS:
You can see by the shadows of the curve how the 1943 spring has flattened and is no longer usable. Even the stock 1989 spring is losing its spring with age.
The NEW one fits beautifully with this and all High Powers, no matter their age.
The original sear is pretty rough, easier to see in close-ups.
View attachment 4453


Some original parts:
The grips are soft, dry and crumbling.
The original Guide Rod with the slotted end cap.
View attachment 4454
Thank you. I won't be shooting this one as I have several others that fill that purpose. I took it down today and everything appears original. And yes, the sear spring should definitely be replaced before shooting this one, and the sear.
 
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