Handguns and Ammunition Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone I have recently inherited a Browning High Power that has a black holster with it that has matching serial numbers. I have been told that it is from the WWII Era. The serial numbers are 51546 there are other stamps on it that should show up in the pictures.
Any further information would be appreciated.
Helmet Automotive tire Automotive lighting Wood Motor vehicle
Air gun Wood Trigger Wood stain Gun barrel
Air gun Wood Trigger Wood stain Gun barrel
Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Shotgun
Wood Air gun Trigger Door Automotive exterior
Air gun Trigger Wood Gun accessory Gun barrel
Helmet Automotive tire Automotive lighting Wood Motor vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Hello,

First... your pictures are not sharp or detailed enough to easily read the marks on the pistol. It seems to have Belgian proof marks (I'd like to be able to see the one with an asterisk over a letter) which only appeared on the pistols in production at the time of invasion. The Germans added their own proof marks, and I can't see those on this pistol. It looks like it has a trigger which does not feature the magazine disconnect safety... that didn't happen until later in the occupation. The finish looks to be in good condition... probably too good for a wartime pistol?

By serial number, the proof marks I cannot read and the mark on the front of the right side of the trigger guard, I would guess it could be a well kept pistol from 1953 or so.

As to the magazine disconnect safety, does it have one? There should be a pin, or the hole where the MDS pin would be on the trigger... that area of the trigger is in shadows on your photos. Also, it would be impossible to pull the trigger on a cocked pistol if the magazine is not in place. When checking please do so safely with no ammo in the pistol or magazine or nearby....

If it is a post war gun there will be additional test marks in different places. Some are date codes, some may be department codes. The back (outside) of the firing pin retention plate is often a good place look as well as the foot of the barrel and inside the slide. You might be looking for a number surrounded by a partial box. The configuration of the sides of the box helps indicate the quarter the part was marked with the number indicating the year.

I am attaching two photos here, both are my pistols.

The first is the left side of my 1950 High Power. The mark circled in RED-YELLOW is the date code and it was stamped is upside down. It is a "0." with sides of a partial box on the top and the right. These are often not cleanly marked and might require some interpretation. Yours seems to be on the other side of the trigger guard, placement I have seen on other pistols from 1952 and after. Similar marks will be found on other parts of the pistol and they may not match... not all parts for each pistol were made at the same time.

The marks circled in GREEN (asterisk over Letter) indicates the identity of the Controller of Proof, the final inspector. These are nicely stacked on the frame and slide. There is a list with names and years of employment. You can also see the pin in the hole on the trigger for the Magazine Disconnect Safety. The pin on the frame (green line from circle running through it) is the trigger assembly pin.

Eyewear Material property Font Personal protective equipment Audio equipment


This second photo is a 1943 Occupation produced pistol of generally the same area but with the slide locked open. You can see the German marks on the slide and frame. When the slide is closed, they are stacked much like the Belgian proof marks.

The trigger assembly pin shows on this picture to the left of the Nazi Proofs on the frame above the trigger. There is no hole for the Magazine Disconnect Safety on this trigger.

Brown Motor vehicle Wood Automotive exterior Font



If you post more pictures I would take another look for you.

Cheers,

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Hello again,

In a picture of your pistol in the old thread from 2010, I believe I can see the mark on the right front of the trigger guard is the number 2. I can't make out the sides of "the box".

I am convinced yours is a 1952 pistol. This was before they were imported to the USA and possibly purchased by a GI to bring home after service, stationed in post-war Germany or Korea. I have heard they were available at the PX up through at least the end of the Vietnam era. I did not serve and am personally unfamiliar with this, though I have heard of Veterans who brought them home.

If you know about the life of the person you inherited it from, you may be able to guess how it was acquired. I know very little about the origins of mine.

Cheers!

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will repack some picture with the marks you want In better lighting. It does have a magazine disconnect. You cannot fire if the gun does not have a magazine. Thank you for your information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here are a few more pictures, the holster also have matching serial numbers with the guys name in green ink.
I have no history other than my dad purchased it from a friend in 1974. Both my dad and frien have passed.
Light Yellow Wood Material property Gas
Motor vehicle Material property Gas Automotive exterior Auto part
White Light Black Material property Wood
Gas Audio equipment Font Gadget Handwriting
Bumper Wood Automotive tire Automotive exterior Vehicle door
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I am suddenly in a hurry to leave for a work trip. I will be back in a few days.

In the meantime, the Controller of Proof code [*R] was used only by Wagemans Sylvain, from 1951 - 1965. This mark serves as a good reference for dating a High Power.

Mine was in fairly good shape, with only minor surface rust when I bought it a couple years ago. I had it "optimized" for shooting at BHSS and added the SFS system (which I add to all of my High Powers - except the 1943 Nazi marked one) because it appeared the Trigger Assembly Pin had been installed improperly by the previous owner, probably after removing the Magazine Disconnect Safety. The Extractor was in good shape and did not need to be replaced. In 1962 they changed the extractor design to use an External Extractor. The original Internal Extractors are hard to find, but don't often break or need to be replaced. I keep a spare on hand because I have two High Powers which use them. A new production internal extractor can be purchased from Jack First Gun Parts, Idaho. I have one in the 1943 pistol, just to keep the original in good shape.

Except for the old style sights, mine is a pretty good shooter. Of course, "optimization" included all new springs. She also wears new grips... the ones she came with were not original walnut grips and were designed for someone with enormous hands.

You have a very nice Classic High Power! Likely from 1952.

I'd love to see a closeup of the mark on the front right side of the trigger guard, and wonder if you can disassemble the pistol and look for other similar marks...

I imagine Karl Janssen was the original owner, possibly a GI stationed overseas, and bought the holster at the same time. I know nothing about the holster... just guessing.

If you have other questions, post them here and I will take a look when I return from my trip.

Cheers,

Tim

Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Gun accessory


Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Everyday carry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thank you so much, even though it does not have the history I'd have hoped for it is still a great gun that shoots very well. I inherited quite a few guns from my father and have 8 grandkids that will be getting them as they grow older. Here's a pic of few other Browning's I have. I'll go into them further when you get back. Thanks again and have a safe trip. I'm sorry the Baby Browning is really a French UNIQUE Model 10.
Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Gun accessory Metal
Trigger Wood Air gun Gun barrel Gun accessory
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top