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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took a new GP100 to the range today. After about 12 rounds, the cylinder wouldn't rotate without some help. When I tried to fire it double action, the hammer would move back about a quarter of the way and wouldn't budge after that unless I rotated the cylinder manually.
Does anyone have any ideas as to what might be wrong?

thanks,
whw
 

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Heya Whw,

Could be a lot of things, but sounds like the cylinder gap is too tight. Did it loosen up again as soon as it cooled off and was cleaned?

If its brand new, trip back to the factory might be in order.


Regards,

Pat
 

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Howdy Mr. Whw,

Sorry to hear you are having an issue with your revolver sir. It is very difficult to accurately assess some problems over the net, and as was noted it could in reality be several things. It could also be a problem with the hand/pawl that rotates the cylinder as well. It is just difficult to say.

Since it is NIB, you may just want to send it back to Ruger along with a letter that provides as much info relating to your problem as possible. The rounds you used, temperature, etc.

Good luck.

twoguns
 

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It could also be a problem with the hand/pawl that rotates the cylinder as well. It is just difficult to say.
I think Twoguns is on the right track. I had the same problem with mine but I bought it used and Ruger wanted me to pay shipping both ways. I traded it in instead. Yours being new you should have no trouble having them repair it for free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the feedback. I'll just send it back to the factory.

I had hoped for a quick fix since this model gun just doesn't have a history of problems. It is curious that I can rotate the cylinder easily with my finger, but can't when trying to shoot it double action. In addition, the gun works just fine when dry firing. There is a definite change in the way the gun works after the first round if fired.

Again, thanks for all the info.

thanks,
whw
 

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Howdy Mr. Whw,

Glad we could help sir. I was a factory trained Ruger revolver armorer, as my agency at that point in time issued the Ruger SR737. That was why I made the guess I made, but I could still be wrong too. As I said it is nearly impossible to accurately diagnose some things over the net.

But since you just said what you did about being able to get it to function properly while dry firing, I would suggest you note that in your letter to them. That way the armorer assigned your weapon understands it may well function properly in his hands unfired, during inspection. He may have to hit their range with it to find the real issue. Otherwise they may well think there is no problem to repair and just send it back saying inspected or some such.

Give enough details in your letter that they can clearly understand they will have to work a bit, firing the revolver too, to see the problem.

The fact it functions properly while dry firing, makes me wonder if my guess was correct too. Mr. Pff may have been on the right track, or it could well be something totally different causing things.

Good luck. Please share your repair experiences with us, and let us have a range report on your new lady once she comes back from the factory.

twoguns
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good luck. Please share your repair experiences with us, and let us have a range report on your new lady once she comes back from the factory.

twoguns[/quote]

Thanks again for the advice. I will write a complete explanation and let you know the final resolution.

thanks,
whw
 

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this may well be a good time to ask a question of my own if i may?

I have a Ruger GP 100 at work that has developed a similar problem. not having much experience with revolvers (but mainly lack of time) i have not been able to check it out yet.

the problem is it can only be fired in double action. if the hammer is cocked, 99% of the time it will fall. In other words it will not cock and lock.
would it be a result of something broken or is it more likely to have a badly worn sear/hammer?

thanks in advance

Bang bang.
 

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Howdy Mr. Bangbang,

Well sir, I am simply thinking out loud here, and surely will never claim to be an expert of Rugers or any other weapon. But it sounds as if there is a problem with either the hammer or the sear. Those two parts mate together in both single or double action shooting. It sounds as if it is possible that the hammer or sear has a broken/worn part that prevents the revolver from staying engaged in single action mode until the trigger is pulled.

Again I could be wrong sir, but on that one, that is my best guess. I know being in Australia, things are not quite so easy for your club to just send it back to Ruger for repair. But all the same, that is sort of what I would suggest, for the possible liability involved if someone at your club actually tried to replace parts in house - unless the club has a licensed gunsmith.

But instead of the factory in the US, I would hope and suspect they would probably have a factory repair center in Australia, which you could ship the revolver to for repair.

I have never been inside a GP100 before, as they had not been released to my knowledge when I attending this school, or they were just about to be released I think. The thing I learned quickly about the Ruger revolver models that existed then (1987), regardless of what the outward appearance was, for the most part the internal parts were the same ones.

That could have changed over the years with newer models, but I suspect that still largely holds true for Ruger revolvers.

Hopefully another member may be able to offer their thoughts on this problem too sir.

Again, if your club does send it off, especially to a local facility there, please share the experience with us. I know I am alwasy interested to compare how things work in various countries, and I suspect some of our other members would be interested to hear the results there too sir.

Good luck,

twoguns
 

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thank you sir,

I will when we are quiet next week pull it apart to see what is wrong. if it is worn then no doubt we will have to get some new parts or send it off. if it is broken then i could easily repair it myself (with my years or mechanical experience behind me)

however as pointed out by you and others there could liability issues if someone was to be injured due to a repair i have conducted. I think we have to be a licensed gunsmith to do repairs here in AUS, not sure? so for now it will be a look see until i find out the full legal requirements of repair work

Something i no doubt will have to discuss with the boss.

thanks again BB
 

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today i fixed my Ruger (work gun)


the problem was very simple. the spring loaded trigger assembly release latch was protruding to far out and stopping the mainspring guide from moving down. (arrow). thus preventing the sear to engage with the hammer and lock it back. it took me about ten minutes to find the problem, file a few thousands of an inch off the release latch and put it back together. apparently it had been to the gunsmiths on 2 occasions and returned saying they cannot find the problem nor fix it!
...mmm its hard to get good help these days. the problem is when the trigger assembly is first fitted after being disassembled for cleaning, it works fine for the first 6 to 12 rounds and then the "recoil" was letting the lever move backwards to much.
i am 100% confident i have fixed the problem and tested it numerous times by hitting the gun with a rubber mallet to simulate recoil, before using live ammo.

of course our gun is much older than yours and most likely this problem was caused by wear and tear Mr Whw, but i guess its possible your ruger has a similar problem given what you first wrote?. from memory the part number was TO4600 in the ruger manual if you want to check it yourself, unless of course you have already sent it back to the factory.

after fixing mine i would be very interested to hear how you get on with your brand new gun. please let us know when you have the chance.

bang bang
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mr. bang bang
Thanks very much for the very thorough description as it relates to your gun repair. I haven't sent mine back to the factory yet, so I'll poke and prod a bit before placing it in the mail.
I'll let you know how it turns out. Again, thanks for the information.

whw
 

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Thanks for your compliments.
I have to admit i was in the automotive trade for 13 years so i have had a lot of hands on experience with all things mechanical. my latest job working on a gun range has me fixing, dismantling and cleaning, unjamming etc all types of handguns and rifles. i have never seen so many guns fall apart or malfunction in all my life as i have done in the last few months.
but its been a hell of a lot of fun!


hope you get your baby sorted soon, my advice however would be if you do fix it yourself make 100% sure it won't drop the hammer unexpectedly! and i mean 100%. i spent a fair amount of time hitting the gun hard with a rubber mallet to simulate massive amounts recoil before i was happy. let us know what you find,

BB

PS, come to think of it we has a .22 Taurus revolver on range that has a problem with the cylinder not rotating correctly. if i get time tomorrow ill sus that one out and see if there is anything that could be useful to pass on to you.
 

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bang bang,

Thanks for your post and excellent description and drawing of your fix on the Ruger, and will be looking for your thoughts on the cylinder problem on the Taurus .22.

Thanks again,

papabear
 

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no problem.
I have put in a photo in place of the sketch now. also i would like to add that the gun had not been to a gun smith as i was previously told. bursting my own bubble i know, but no sense in big noting myself over false statements.

The Taurus had the exact opposite problem than i first thought. the cylinder would rotate with little effort when the hammer was cocked or not. what i put this down to is soft steel. the cylinder is showing signs of wear in the groves that lock the cylinder in line with the barrel. these guns fire about 100- 200 rounds per day on average. a good gun for little use but i would not recommend them as an every day gun. compared to the S&W on range that has fired more than twice as many rounds the S&W shows no sign of wear in the same area and the cylinder stays locked.

so I don't think this helps Whw with his problem. i think it is fair to say i (we) should not deviate from his original question any further in this post. my appoligies for side tracking the issue at hand.

BB
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hello Everyone,

My GP-100 made its way back from Ruger repair today. The enclosed packing slip identified the following as being, "repaired."

>>Barrel
>>Internal components as needed
>>Crane
>>Cylinder
>>Cylinder Release Button
>>Pawl

Still not sure what the problem was, but it must have been more extensive than I first thought. I'll test fire it this weekend to see how it performs.

Again, thanks for everyone's feedback.

whw
 

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Wow that sounds like some pretty serious stuff they had to replace.
sounds like the tolerence of the matting parts where never checked properly at construction.

glad to hear you finally got your gun back. let us know how it shoots now when you get the chance.

BB
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Sounds like they changed everything but the frame.
Looking forward to hearing how it shoots.
When I checked the repair list, I had to double check the serial number on the frame. It was the same. Might even be the same grips too.
 
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