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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Many thanks to ELB for his excellent write-up of his experiences with John Farnam's Defensive Handgun Class.

It got me to thinking that while nothing is a substitute for a good instructor and a hands-on experience with that teacher, it's not always possible to take such a class.

Books can be a great substitute and many can learn by reading and practicing.

I would enjoy knowing what other have found good (or bad) in books and what recommendations you would make.

While I can't pull out a gun in the mall to practice, I can have a good book to read while waiting for the significant other to run out of money or melt the credit cards from excessive use!

ELB, your excellent review has inspired me. I've ordered John Farnam's book and believe it will help me considerably.

What else is good? It can be any firearms book, not just handguns!

Regards to all,

Steve
 

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Farnam's stuff is good. I like Ayoob's old Stressfire and I really like Andy Stanford's Surgical Speed Shooting, not to mention anything by Gabe Suarez.
 

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+1 on Gabriel Suarez's _The Tactical Shotgun_ (Boulder: Paladin Press, 1996). I don't think I care much for the writing style, but the important information is all of a piece with what I learned in a defensive shotgunning course. I use it as a "refresher" on that stuff.

A book my wife and I used to help prepare for the Texas CHL course that you might find of use: Chris Bird _The Concealed Handgun Manual: How to Choose, Carry, and Shoot a Gun in Self Defense_ 4th. ed. (San Antonio: Privateer Publications, 2004).

We should probably all acquire Stephen Camp's books on the subject matter at some point, yes?

--d.
 

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Hello. Not necessarily, although I appreciate the thought. "Defensive Handguns" is more for folks just getting their feet wet in the area of the handgun for self-protection. It is probably too vanilla for folks here.

Thanks again and best.
 

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Hello. Well, that sort of depends upon the existing skill level of the user, if the handgun is intended to be carried concealed, open, kept in the vehicle, or one strictly for use at home as well as if it is to served "double-duty" as a range gun or possibly small game hunting.

Best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mr. Camp, I was referring to books as anymore gun suggestions from you might result in my bankruptcy!<BG>

Seriously, I think your expertise with guns would make your book suggestions very valid.

Regards,

Steve
 

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Hahahahahahahaha! Man, I nearly fell off the chair and coffee ain't so great out the nose! I'll tell you a book I really value, but fully admit that it is tangential to defensive tactics and such:

"Gunshot Wounds" by Dr. Vincent J.M. Di Maio

He was the chief medical examiner for Bexar County, TX and a recognized expert in this topic.

The book is printed by Elsevier Press

ISBN: 0-444-00928-0

My copy was printed in 1985.

Now much of it really isn't all that much down the alley we're interested in, but more than a little is and there are some rather graphic photos of what "it" really looks like. (All that is missing is the terror and the smell.)

The Ayoob books are good in my opinion. I have not read but a paragraph or two of Mr. Suarez' work. That is not a reflection on him, just that when I actually saw one of his books in print, I was very pressed for time.

One of the best suggestions I can offer is to have a plan. Sure, it probably will not go right, but at least you will have something to try and work with rather than nothing.

Most of my "tactics" were learned in several tactical schools I attended during 11 years on the tactical team. When you boil it all down, I'd say that the most important things are:

1. Knowing if one will actually shoot another person even if very justified
2. Having the ability to maintain a semblance of cool-headed thinking under stress
3. Having the skill to get the hit(s) under stress and in a compressed time frame
4. Caliber, gun type, and load

The best thing is to be observant of one's surroundings. IF we can see "it" coming, we might be able to avoid deadly conflict altogether. I'd take a look at Jeff Cooper's "Principals of Personal Defense" as well.

Best.
 

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Steve,

I think it is fun (as well as instructive) to read some of the older stuff from time to time, such as Jordan's "No Second Place Winner" or Bill Clede's "Police Handgun Manual."

As far as modern writing on the mechanics goes, I think it is tough to beat Jim Crew's material. I do feel that Farnam and Ayoob also do a great job of covering other aspects such as mental preparedness and legal implications of defensive use of firearms.

Finally, Mr. Camp's characteristic modesty is in evidence here...in my opinion there are few shooters who would not learn something valuable from his writings. I know I certainly have.

PGM
 

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Hello. Thanks very, very much. By golly, you're right. I forgot all about Jim Crew's book. I don't think I still have the listing for his site.

Best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jim Crews books seem to be difficult to find. I read there was a CD or DVD series of his books a few years ago, but I'm not for sure.

Several websites lsted have proved not to be good anymore.

Any leads?

Thanks.

Steve
 

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Sgphoto,

The only other lead I have is an email address (listed in the book). You might try [email protected]; I don't know if it is still active or not. If he is still printing it, the book is not inexpensive, but there are a lot of detailed photographs and the handgun manual runs to 265 8.5 X 11 pages. I'm afraid I don't know anything about the CDs or DVDs.

PGM
 

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My favorites are:
Louis Awerbuck's "Tactical Reality" and "More Tactical Reality".
Tom Givens' "Fighting Smarter".

I don't have, and need to get, Jim Crews books on handgun and carbine.
 

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sgphoto,

I am very pleased that my comments were of use to you. Such praise! <blush!> However, the credit should go to John and Vickie Farnam (John teaches the more advanced classes - Vickie handles the beginners - I took the beginner course). I do find his book on Defensive Handgunning useful, but it can be a tedious read in some places because he covers all types of actions - revolver, single-action semi, self-decocking semi, etc. It is not a subsititute for the class, but it is very good. I highly recommend you check out his website and class schedule -- I paid $400 for the course, which I thought was highly reasonable.

Also check out the section of his website entitled "Quips, quotes, and lesson's learned" http://defense-training.com/quips/quips.html. As he talks to others and learns things, he sends emails to his students to kind of update us on current thinking and new gizmos, and every so often he posts all the emails on his website. I think this is an excellent practice for an instructor to adopt.

Again, I am very pleased you got some benefit from my comments. I have learned a lot in this forum, and it just makes my day that I was able to give something back, so to speak. :)

elb

p.s. and thanks for bringing this thread up, and thanks to the others for the book recommendations. I have several of the Ayoob books, but did not know of some of the other ones. elb
 

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There are too many to list. So I will list authors

Anything by Jeff Cooper (not are are detailed gun books but are well worth the reading)

Anything by John Farnham

Anything by Tom Givens

Anything by Steve Camp (I disagree with Steve that they are "plain vanilla"...I have trained nearly 10,000 students...most people, including me, are well served with the straight forward and practical information in these type books).

Anything by Ken Hackathorn

Anything by Louis Awerbuck

Anything by Steve Moses

There are more, I am coming off the top of my head so don't consider omission a recomendation to avoid.

Good luck in the quest!

Jim Higginbotham
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks. I'll give a look there.

I've read many of the suggestions so far, and Massad Ayoob stands out to me for his professionalism writing skills, practicality, and common sense.

His Combat Handgunning, 5th ed., is a great introduction, particularly to someone who has some experience already.
Regards,
Steve
 
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