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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So there is a guy over on THR forum who has a NIB FNP-9 with 3 16 rd. LEO mags for $450 including shipping.

I live in Ohio, so hi-cap mags are legal and I understand that it no longer matters that they are marked LEO.

So my question is this: does it make any sense to buy something like this for future increased value? LEO mags are starting to hit the market and pistols with LEO mags are now showing up.

There is probably no way to know how many HP LEO mags were manufactured, but they are no longer made, so new ones may be in limited supply.

Also does this model FN fit into the lot that will no longer be imported? I am always interested in handguns that are no longer available. Could this pistol/mag combination be of collector value? poppy
 
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In my opinion, the collectible value of FN's version of the "plastic fantastics" is nil. The market for synthetic-frame handguns has pretty much become saturated, with Glock dominating the market. I believe most of the synthetic-frame autopistols that don't get a toe-hold in the market --- most or the great majority of the ones "out there" --- like the FNP-9, will fade from the market and be dropped from production. In which case, without any parts and service support from the manufacturer, their market price will drop from what it is now.

All of which is IMHO, but I collect handguns and have a feel for this sort of thing.


 

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Hello. I strongly agree with what has been said. I seriously doubt that these pistols would command much as a collector's item, but IF you like the pistol, I'd buy it to shoot and use, obtain extra magazines and some spare parts ... just in case, but I don't think I'd buy it in the hopes that its value would go up significantly.

The Steyr M and S pistols have some devoted users to be sure, but the pistol just never caught on over here compared to others such as the Glock, HK, and even the inexpensive Keltecs probably outsold the Steyr. Now that the US has banned Steyr from importing their products into the US, their pistols that are already here have not gone up and can often be found in the $300 range.

I have not noted any noticeable "I've-got-to-have-it-or-I'm-gonna-die" type buying of the FN pistol you mention. I suspect that it is a good pistol for concealed carry and probably quite reliable, but for whatever reasons, rightly or wrongly, I truly don't see it becoming either extremely popular or a collector's piece.

Best.

Best.
 
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Now that the US has banned Steyr from importing their products into the US, their pistols that are already here have not gone up and can often be found in the $300 range.
What's the deal with Steyr? Did they get caught selling guns to Al Quaeda or something?

CDNN has been selling the Steyr plastic autos for at least of couple of years, and that's an indication that they haven't sold through conventional marketing channels and are being "unloaded" to CDNN for low-price disposal. They had to be the ugliest autopistols ever designed.
 

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Hello. Yes, I believe that is correct. I'm not sure if it was Al Queda specifically, however. They were certainly odd-looking and I never got to mess around with one enough to see if the trapizoidal sights would work for me or not. I didn't find the Steyr anymore comfortable to hold than the FNP-9.

Best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess, at the heart of my question is, would a pistol like this increase in value like the Colt All American 2000 which was in the $400 range when new and now commands prices in the $750 range because they are collectable.

The plastic Colt was a failure and went out of production. Why would not the FN be in a similar category? poppy
 
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No. And I believe that there are a combination of things as to why:

Colt occupies a revered place in American handgun-dom. In my area, used excellent to near mint-condition 1970's - early 90's production Series 70 and 80 Colt Government Models (not the late-production "Enhanced" versions) command prices comparable to or exceeding new low and mid-priced model Kimbers and Springfield Armory M1911 clones, even though the later marques are probably at least as good quality and have the upgraded features that current purchasers of these type of handguns demand. Why? Because the name "Colt" is magic in the marketplace.

Although the All American 2000 (and the Double Eagle) was an abject failure in the market place (and which very nearly sunk Colt due to the development and tooling costs of these pistols, which they were never able to recoup), because it is a Colt and is very uncommon, collectible market demand apparently is high. I say apparently because my 3-4 year-old "Blue Book" lists the polymer-frame (there was also an aluminum-alloy frame) All American 2000 at $750 in 100% (new) condition.

Now there is a caveat to this: Since the beginning of my serious handgun collecting I learned to pretty much disregard the values in the Blue Book because the were so at odds with the market values of given guns in my area (the "book" is usually on the low side, commonly way on the low side). Another caveat: Rare or very uncommon guns, because of their rarity or uncommoness, are so seldom bought, sold or traded that it can be very difficult to determine exactly what a true market value is. In such cases, the Blue Book value can be poor or perhaps not much more than a guess. Still another caveat: Because of this, gun and pawn shop dealers are clueless, based on their experience with the handgun, as to its market value. So what do they do?: Reach for the Blue Book. Thus, the Blue Book often drives gun prices, rather than the other way around as it's supposed to do. To whit: The high "book" price of the All American 2000 may very well be illusory.

To get back to your question: Many, if not most, current autopistol aficiondos don't know what "FN" stands for. They neither recognize or trust the marque. When the FNP-9 is dropped from the marketplace, nobody will notice. It is lost in a nearly saturated market of similar DAO "plastic fantastics," with new ones being introduced almost every month. As Mr. Camp said, if you like the handgun, can get it at a good price and invest in the parts that are most likely to break or wear out, go for it. But a valuable collectible handgun, it will not become. At least in this century.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all, for your responses. I think I will pass on the FNP, unless of course I can "steal" one.


Hey Alan, did you change your handle? or are there two of you in Nevada? poppy
 
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Last Saturday when I tried to get on this website, it wouldn't let me on. Said that my user name had been changed (to the same one, but with all lower case letters). But it wouldn't recognize or accept the user name that it said I had to use.

So had to create another account with a different user name
:(" title=":mad:" border="0"/>.
 
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I think I will pass on the FNP, unless of course I can "steal" one.
Keep an eye on CDNN. There's a quite significant chance that the FN FP's will eventually show up there, and at significantly lower prices.

 
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