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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know we all have had rounds that for one reason or another, the primer has been hit but the round didn't fire - but have you ever really experienced a hang-fire where the round did go off seconds later? "Safety experts" always state to keep the gun pointed in a safe direction for 30 seconds when a round doesn't fire.

How about a squib load - where the bullet has left the casing, but not made it out the barrel?

Never actually seen either, but I'm curious if the more expericenced shooters have.
 

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When shooting friends' milsurps with their ammo (I always research before buying to be sure my ammo won't do this), I've had several hangfires. The delay was not measured in seconds, but in fractions of seconds . . . maybe even all the way up to a second. Pretty interesting. My friends had warned me what to expect, so it wasn't too alarming.

Now, all of this ammo was O L D! I mean, really old. (I know it happened with 8x56R ammo, and I can't remember the other type - it's been years.)

Oddly, not all old ammo is problematic. I've got some Turk 8x57 ammo for my Yugo Mauser that's from 1940 (65 yrs old), and it's still hell-on-wheels.
 

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Squib load times two.

The first was about 15 years ago. We were running through some drills using commercially re-manufactured (read cheap range reloads) when I fired the first round of what was supposed to be a double tap. The difference in the sound made me instinctively freeze halfway through trigger on the second round. Sure enough there was a bullet lodged halfway down the barrel.

The second was about five years ago under somewhat similar circumstances, except it was slow fire.

I started carrying an eight inch long, quarter inch diameter wooden dowel and a hammer in my range bag after that.

I've also had a round that wouldn't feed properly during some high speed drills. Imagine my surprise when I found out our remanufactured ammo had some .40s loaded in amongst the 9mms.

Each of these potentially lethal "negative events" was with commercially available, "factory remanufactured" ammo. This is why I run the other way when remanufactured ammo is on offer.
 

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I've experienced both with factory ammo. The hangfire was when using "remanufactured" ball ammo in 30-06 with my 1945 vintage M1 Garand.

A squib load in gun show handloaded 9mm with frangible bullets locked up a friend's Baby Eagle until he could get into the shop to remove the stuck bullet. The bullet only got into the rifling, but it hung fast.
 

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A friend in our shooting club had a squib with a handloaded round in his 38special. No big deal, just pushed the bullet out with a small rod. He figured inadequate powder was in that one.
og
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Man, the stories about the squib loads really scare me the most. I wouldn't want to be in the same area code if another round was fired without clearing the barrel first.
 

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Yes,

I have had squib loads when I first started reloading .38/.357 magnum rounds for revolvers back in the early 90's. As careful as I thought I was being, a moment's inattention can be a disaster in the making!

In one instance, I "heard" the squib go off and stopped shooting only to find the bullet lodged in the barrel. The next two instances, the bullets lodged in the forcing cone of the revolver(s) I was shooting and tied up the cylinder preventing me from shooting the next round.

Now I inspect the loading block for the powder depth in each casing with a small flashlight when reloading.

My local shooting range keeps a revolver in a wall mounted display case with an exploded cylinder and top strap as a reminder to those "who roll their own" to be careful!

Chris
 

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Squibs and hangfires over the years. Squibs my fault (re-loading errors). Hangfires from quality of ammunition (Egyptian).
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have not had one happen to me, but I have seen squib loads on the range during pistol matches. When working as a range or safety officer, it is imperative to listen for the squip go pop and stop the shooter immediately so as to avoid damage to a pistol or injury to the shooter. In my experience, squib loads are usually the result of errors in handloading. I have never had a true hangfire and have not seen one.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Remington 1970, .357 S&W Magnum 125-grain Semi-Jacketed Hollow Point. Had to use a stick to remove a bullet from a S&W Model 28 Highway Patrolman's 4" barrel's forcing cone.

It wasn't fun

Scott
 

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I've never had a hangfire, but I have had several squib loads. They make a peculiar noise and have a very different feel, which is a good thing, as I have not yet shot the next round afterwards. Happened once in an IPSC match, very embarassing. In each case, they were reloads, which means user error. I carry a small ball peen hammer and a dowel rod that is just under 9mm dia. for just this purpose -- to knock them back out. I have learned how to be more careful without sacrificing a great deal of speed over the years, and have not had one for some time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've never had a hangfire, but I have had several squib loads. They make a peculiar noise and have a very different feel, which is a good thing, as I have not yet shot the next round afterwards. Happened once in an IPSC match, very embarassing. In each case, they were reloads, which means user error. I carry a small ball peen hammer and a dowel rod that is just under 9mm dia. for just this purpose -- to knock them back out. I have learned how to be more careful without sacrificing a great deal of speed over the years, and have not had one for some time.
When you use a rod and tap out the failed round, do you field strip and tap the bullet forward out the barrel, or do you insert the rod from the muzzle and push in back towards the chamber?
 

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Field strip if auto -- I find it easier to deal with the barrel alone. Of course that is not an option with a revolver. I am not worried, in this instance, about going in from the muzzle end, as it is a wooden dowel rod, no danger of damaging the crown.
 
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