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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy folks,

This topic might have worked just as well in general discussion, but I just felt it made more sense going here.

This is just a suggestion I have never really thought to throw out, as I felt it was fairly common place until recently. I was shooting with a friend at an indoor range, and he was having some problems with two of his magazines for his HP. I watched him separate the problems mags on the shooting shelf, only to mistakenly load them again and continue to have feeding issues.

He told me that more and more of his mags seemed to be having problems, and I just grinned and told him he kept loading the two problem mags by mistake. When we left the shooting portion of the range, I asked him why he did not number his magazines. The look I got from him made me realize my question made no real sense to him at all, lol.

I picked up this trick many years ago, when I first began carrying various pistols on duty. Initially I used an engraver to number the base plates. When I started using rubber pads, I had to find a different way to number them.

I use a label maker to print out numbers, which I then place on the base pads of my mags. Even on rubber base plates the adhesive will stick fairly well. But then I add a piece of the clear plastic adhesive sheeting over the number to help it stay on better.

If I have a mag begin to act up on me during quals or practice, I can glance down and note which number it is. I just write the number down on an ammo box or scrap of paper and throw it in my range bag. When I get home I don't have to remember which pocket of my range bag I stuck the problem mag in, or realize I forgot to separate the problem mag from my others. Then I can grab it and try to get it back up to speed by changing parts as needed.

I thought this was a fairly common practice, but then I realized most of the other instructors in my office basically followed my lead and numbers their mags after seeing mine numbered. A few of the more firearms oriented agents did too.

I just thought I would throw this suggestion out in case it might benefit any of our members.

Shoot well and shoot often,

twoguns
 
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All of my magazines have plastic bumpers on the bottom, so I just scratch dashmarks on the bumpers with a pocket knife. I must admit that they get a little hard to read when there's more than seven or eight dashmarks plus the scratches from dropping them on the ground. Maybe I need a new system. ~Pistolero
 

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I number mine with a number/letter set of small steel stamps I got some years ago. Generally I do this on the plastic bumpers for 1911s or BHP. Plastics guns just be twacked on the base plate. It is not too deep and it lets me both account for them and track any malfunctions. The Pach bumper pads I generally do by heating the stamps up with a lighter. Then I wipe them with white out to make them readable in a hurry.
 

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I mark mine with a 'paint pen' that is readily available from most office supply stores. I will use different markings for different Mags. FN mags are marked one way, Inglis another, and Browning a third way. My CZ, Glock and SIG mags are marked using different systems.

The different systems make things simple when I go looking for mags for a particular gun and I'm in a hurry. It saves getting to the range with the wrong mags.
 

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I number mine.

If I have a problem, I want to know which mag was in the gun at the time. That sounds easy to keep up with until it happens when too many things might be going on (anything from being in a class and trying to listen to instruction while segregating that mag, to shooting multiple guns at the range, to trying to get done before it rains).

Even on guns that I only have a couple of mags for- I'll put a small sticker or piece of tape on and write a number on it.
 

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Gents,

Something I may start doing is numbering my magazines on the back side just above the base with a number stamp (metal). It's permanent. If I trash a magazine I can test it and re-number with the number of the magazine I replaced. To mark magazines bad at the range I use target tape pasted over the feed lips (side to side) and put them back in the range bag. Orange spotters work, too.
The magazines that Cylinder and Slide sent back with my pistols had a hand etched cs on the back of them.
Just some ideas...

Wes
 

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Yup, I number them. I started doing this when I had some trouble with a semi-auto, and was trying to determine whether it was magazine related, and if so, which one. Now I number all mags for all my semi-autos, and I even track the number of rounds cycled thru each. I do this to make sure that the mags I use for concealed carry have worked properly with each type of carry ammo. I usually get several mags for each gun, so I need to keep track to make sure I know which mags are "qualified," so to speak.
elb
 

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I used to be real anal about numbering mags, especially when I was packing a pair of G19's. Have close to 2 dozen mags for them. Then checking notes I realized that ALL the malfs came from NFML prebans.

More recently on plastic floorplates I cut a tiny notch on ones that have given problems. I seem to lose notes and scribbles lately


Serious or repeat problems I just belabor it with a blunt instrument and discard.


Regards,

Pat
 
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I take the bumpers off my mags and leave them off. My numbering system is very low tech. I just tape a narrow strip of masking tape to the base plates and number them with a Sharpie. Some I don't number because I only have one: 1 8round SS Wilson and a 8 round Cobra Mag. Good way to see if your ammo, magazines and pistol is compatible with your SD ammo.
 

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To follow-up:

I got four new Mec-Gar HiPower mags late last week (backordered from Midway's sale last month). When getting ready to go to an IPSC match Sunday (I always use my carry gun), I tossed the new mags in with my stuff.
All I had done was wipe the excess oil off, and number them with a Sharpie. I almost didn't bother to mark them yet.

I would never use a magazine for carry without testing it first, but thought I'd use the match as a chance to give them some use.

To summarize the day, I had my first malfunction with that gun, and picked another mag up from the ground with the top round standing straight up between the feed lips.
Another shooter- also using his carry gun- had two feed-related malfunctions.

At a glance, I knew which magazine caused both my problems (it was the same one in both cases). I now know to watch magazine #13 and use it for practice only.
The other shooter did not mark his mags, so may now have the problem of a bad mag (and not knowing which) or a gun problem (that he won't know until testing). Until then, he has to carry that gun.

I'm glad I mark mine, and always will.
 

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No, I can't count that high - but dont take it that it means I have an enourmous amount - it says more about my counting than my mags


Actually I did at one time ( I put little furnature bumpers on the base as a pad and numbered those - I still have them in storage - but I gave up on the ones I use regularly).

I seldom have a malfuntion but if I do I normally mark the magazine with a target paster unless I can see something wrong with the round itself.

Jim
 

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Hello mr. twoguns,

I have a nice habit with the HP magazines that sometimes give me fits when the follower gets worn out.

I just disassemble them for parts and don't bother with using them anymore.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Howdy Mr. Chris,

You have me curious, so I will simply ask. When you have a problem mag, do you disassemble on the range, or just mark it somehow to recognize it when you get home?

Just another suggestion for you to consider too sir. With the new Sigs you have, since they are both reasonably new for you, there might be a real advantage to numbering them as well. Just a suggestion for you to consider.

twoguns
 
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