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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is this piece worth the price?, ive only heard mixed feelings on this. what about shooting comfort and accuracy, as well as reliability? i understand someone on one of these threads had a undercover .38 spl and it would only dent some of the primers but not fire
:-/
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have personally (and unfortunately) owned two Charter Arms revolvers and was very unimpressed by the fit, finish and quality. The first was an Undercover .38. The crane was very sloppily fit, althought the cylinder usually indexed properly. The second was a Bulldog Tracker in .44 Special. I soon found out that the aluminum shroud covering the barrel was held in place with cheap glue. As the gun heated up, the shroud came loose and came off the gun. The crane was also sloppy on this piece and was fitted with very thin plastic bushings at the pivot end which were essential to proper indexing but which would self-destruct at the drop of a hat.

I'm aware that some folks, like Stetson, have had good luck with the Charters and I am glad for them. My sense of it is that it is pretty hit and miss with the Charter revolvers. It is my sincere hope that the new Charter has re-engineered and revamped its designs, but I personally have no use for the older ones.

If you want a K-frame or J-1/2 frame sized .44 Special, I recommend that you keep hunting for a used Taurus 431 (fixed sights) or 441 (adjustable sights) or a used Rossi .44 Special. I've owned a Taurus 431 4" for awhile and it's been a very good revolver based upon a solid design with none of the weaknesses of the Charter system. Prices (depending upon condition, of course) will range from about $150-$250. Also, you might want to watch for a used S&W 696 L-frame 5-shot .44 Special. Most folks who own them are hanging onto them because they know they have a gem, but you might sometimes see one for sale....be prepared to pay a bunch...

Just a suggestion and nothing more than my $0.02-I'd just hate to have someone else inherit a problematic Charter revolver when there are several much better alternatives out there.

Bob
 

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ive owned 3 charter arms in the past. two .44spl bulldogs and one pathfinder .22lr.


the first .44spl was the blued bersion with the bobbed hammer. the gun was not timed correctly and could not shoot d/a without shaving lead on every shot, but s/a it would line up right. went back to factory once, they said it was fine. problem continued and i sold it at a lose.

the second was the stainles version of the first...i was in hog heaven up until i got about 100 rounds through it. it too went out of timing, was sloppy, and the cylinder stop (shark fin looking piece) wore down so fast that i could manually rotate the cylinder past its stop. sold at a lose.

the third and i lament letting it go, was a 3" blued pathfinder .22lr. the d/a was stiff, but the s/a was crisp and light. the gun did everything you could want from a "kit gun" type.


i would try them again if it were on somebody elses dime so if it was a lemon i would be out nothing. but this is not a chance i will take again with my money unless its on the old school pathfinders....


just a note, the shroudless guns made in stamford conn., as in the originals, seem to be the very best of the breed.


good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have read (in a gun magazine) that the barrels of the new-generation Charter revolvers, those made by Charter Arms 2000, have the barrels pressed into place, not threaded into the frame like just about all other revolvers. This may be O.K. for carry and maybe very occasional shooting, but with a lot of shooting it's going to be trouble as I believe the barrel will eventually shoot loose (have seen this on very cheap German DA revolvers made in the 1960's or '70's, but the barrels on these were at least pinned into the frame, to keep the barrel from going down-range with the bullet ;)).
 

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I understand that Charter Arms 2000 is under different management then the old Charter Arms Company. ( please correct me if I'm wrong). Back in 1990, my parents split up and my mom wanted a gun in the house for SD/HD. She is not a big shooter, but still wanted a pistol for protection. , knowning much more about guns than her, took her to the gun store, talked her out of buying a little Berretta .22 mousegun like she used to have, and talked her into buying at least a .38. She looked at several revolvers (all j-frame size as she is rather small handed, and intimidated by the bigger guns.) and Chose a Charter arms Undercover. I took her to the range , showed her how to load the weapon ( was using standard pressure CCI Blasers) and fired 5 rounds. On the fith round I saw a glint of something metallic in my perifreal visian, and fels something hit me in the head. I first I figured it eas an ejecting shell until I realized I was holding a revolver, and what hit me in the head was too heavy to be a shell. Looking dounwn I saw the barrel sleeve. Upon examining it, it had only been gluded in! We promptly took it back to the store, ahoweed them the pistol, and traded it for a S&W M-66 Snubby. I put some Pachmyer compact grips on it. And then took it back to the range. She shot it just fine. I have not shot a Charter Arms since then. Just telling the story as a warning and hope that They are better made now then they were.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
if theyre supposed to be a pos, how come gunblast had a godo review, or is it just people bashing charter liek they do hi point
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Don't think it's people bashing Charter...if you'll read a little closer, you'll see that I have merely reported my two experiences with the Charter revolvers I've owned. Both pistols were low-quality junk, at least as far as I'm concerned...and that opinion is not based upon someone else's say-so, but upon my personal experiences. If that's bashing, I guess I'll plead guilty, but otherwise, I don't see how we decide whether our firearms (or cars, or houses, or motorcycles or anything else we own) are of value to us except by personal experience. You may not agree, but that's OK. I don't think that I was bashing the brand or that the others who posted their negative experiences were doing so either...they and I were simply cautioning the thread starter to go carefully and look the Charter guns over closely and compare them to other comparable firearms. If he does that, he'll figure out himself what's best for him.

Respectfully,

Bob
 

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Hello. No, reporting what one's personally seen is not bashing. It is sometimes not pleasant, but so it goes. Often times though, when a company changes management, quality goes up or down. Let's hope that with the Charter Arms revolvers, it is the former.

Best.
 
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