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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can't decide if I should practice the release with my BHP using the "generic" overhand grab version or use the slide release.

I know Clint Smith using the slide release on his 1911 and I am much faster on reloads using this method.

I'm worried about resorting to it with my Glocks even though I may try to sweep them first (which would release the slide 90% of the time probably) I can always revert to the grab method.

Point is that I carry and practice with one gun now and it's a BHP, so what's the harm of using the slide release on a BHP?

I do carry a Glock G21 on duty so there is the "keep it all the same" thinking, but I'm not sure this is such the big issue guru's are making it to be.

What are your thoughts?
 

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.."but I'm not sure this is such the big issue guru's are making it to be." I believe you are quite on point there, Jim. This sure is a topic that brings out the experts--real and imagined--to the 'Net boards, in force and with much emotion.

In my world the important thing is to get that trigger time, and dry-firing drills when not able to be at the range. The Gun-Fu school I'm most familiar with, Tactical Defense Institute in southern Ohio, will not try to jam any one style down your throat. They have preferences on certain firearms techniques of course, and will gladly share their thinking with you if asked--sometimes even if not asked. But instead of a "my way or the highway" mindset, especially on the little things, they'd rather you just shut up 'n' shoot.

Those students who constantly pipe up with questions they think they already know the answers to are just wasting everybody else's time. In the little bit of handgun instruction I've helped administer, it's crossed my mind to give the windbags a "timeout", if only the range had a cloakroom like my old elementary school..


Fwiw all my years in (so called) practical pistol shooting have made me a slide stop pusher. Always seems to work for me, even with my Glocks. Enough repetition and those "fine motor skills" just don't seem too taxing anymore..
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Brian, thanks for the feedback. What you said is very true, and I'm definitely not one to say which way is "better."

I'm coming to the conclusion that if my 90% of the time gun is a BHP/1911 that can handle the repeated dropping of the slide via a beefy slide release, then why not use it? Like you said, even on the Glocks it works most of the time and so what if it did not the first time? You would adapt and use the other method most likely.

I'm kinda putting it in the same category as the "don't shoot 1911's AND Glocks because you may forget to swipe the safety" argument. True it would be a bad idea to shoot a Glock 90% of the time and then carry a 1911 10% of the time (say for a duty gun) but to carry the 1911 90% and Glock 10% would mean a fractional movement swiping the safety that is not on the Glock. So what's the big deal?

That's pretty much how I feel on the BHP 90% gun and Glock 10% gun and using teh slide release 90% of the time.

Just wondering if I'm forgetting a REAL issue with doing so?
 

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Hello,

I use the Sling-Shot method, on all pistols.

Take Care,
The Sockman
 

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Slingshot method. I'm a lefty.

I do reach underneath the pistol (whichever it may be) now and again to release the slide lever, but this is just an alternate and is not primary by any means.

Josh <><
 

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Overhand grip at the rear of the slide, pull and release. Why? It works positively 100% of the time, even if my hands are wet, muddy or whatever no matter what stress inputs there are.
 

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I hit the slide release, when "charging" with a loaded mag. If I'm lowering the slide on an empty chamber, I overhand the slide, thumb the slide release down and slowly release the slide down.
 

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Hi there all,

Overhand grip method. It works all of the time and especially when you have rely on gross motor skills to get your weapon back into action when reloading.

Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am a left too and i was alwase an over hand the slide kind of guy until a practical shooting class I went to two weekends ago got me to start using my trigger finger to drop the slide with the release. I thought it would make me lose a lot of time/accuracy for having to get my grip and trigger finger back into alignment but low and behold that was just me being a good idea fairy and my reload to first round on target times got quicker with it.
But hey thats just my two cents.

Zack
 

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I have an extended slide stop on my Glock 19 and use the slide stop everytime.
 

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By long habit I ususally use the slide stop but I developed that habit long before folks started thinking much about it.

Today I encourage students to think it out for themselves. It does make a lot of sense to use one method, like the overhand, for all guns.

Unfortunately one cannot safely use it in combat for the Beretta M9/92fs (not a problem for Taurus owners as the safety is not on the slide). It does seem to work for S&Ws which also have a "dingus" on the slide but apparently they don't apply so easily.

Good luck!!
Jim
 

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Since a class, I mostly use the overhand yank, but catch myself going for the slide stop now and them.

I wasn't sure if I should try to use the overhand method exclusively or not. I had always used the slide stop.

Here are some of the reasons I've heard in favor of overhand-
1-It's universal from gun to gun.
2-It's the same way I clear malfs.
3-It's a gross motor skill, at least compared to using the slide stop. In a gunfight, I may or may not have fine motor skills due to stress, etc.
3A- I may have busted up the fingers and thumb on my weak hand by the time I'm shooting.

The only disadvantage I saw was that it was a hair slower than using the slide stop. Big deal. With my speed, it's the difference between a five minute mag change and a 4.99 minute one.

Really, the convincing reason was the chance of an injured hand. By the time it comes to guns, my fingers may be cut, broken, or even missing.
I recalled the first IDPA match I shot in about 1998. They painted little hands or guns on targets to make shoots/no-shoots. The targets with guns had a LOT of hits ON THE GUNS.
That reinforced what I had always heard about people shooting for the dangerous part. It made the risk of hand injury seem more realistic.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I utilize thehand over the top of the slide for everything. This is one gross motor skill that is repeated in charging, malfunctions, and clearing. One way every time is just one big gross motor skill. Under duress you may miss that slide release/lock so i take no chances.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Firearmz,

It's frequent missing of the slide under minor stress (competitions) that has me switching back to slide release. Also when running full speed to cover and reloading, the slide release really shines.

YMMV, but I suggest people test the methods extensively rather than follow the current trend "overhand release."
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I use the slide stop and haven't had a problem with it on Glocks. Be aware that your universal overhand or sling shot WILL NOT WORK on some 1911's with recoil buffers. I have encountered some pistols (while shooting IDPA) that you had to use the slide stop. I am not aware of any stock pistols where this is an issue.
 
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