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Hi!

I heard that Beretta will discontinue the production of the 92 FS? Do you know anything about that? Is it true? ??? ??? ???

Jonas
 

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I've read this on a number of gunforums over the last few months.

AFAIK, Beretta USA will continue to produce the original 92 series for the US military and commericial sales for the foreseeable future. This is their number one seller and it wouldn't make economic sense to kill off a profitable firearm like the 92.

Beretta has discontinued the .40 S&W Model 96 from what I read on the Beretta forum several months ago.

I have a pair of US made 92FS's and a JNOX 96. Got plenty of factory mags for the 92's and it is nice that the 9mm mags will fit and function in the 96 if needed.

I daresay that one day Beretta will most likely end production of the 92. This is a growing trend among handgun manufacturers these days. They are dropping their all metal models for polymer framed guns. S&W has discontined most if not all of their "3rd generation" metal pistols for the new plastic M&P's. H&K and Walther have dropped metal pistols from production although the all steel P7 seems to be hanging on barely.

I own a fair number of numerous makes of US and Euro all metal service pistols. My guess is that they will only increase in value in the coming years. Some of us just don't like or care for the plastik pistolen that are all the rage today.


Roadster
 

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Howdy folks,

I have no idea about the production status of the 92.

I was actually surprised they stopped making the 96.

I know in speaking with a Border Patrol firearms instructor several years ago, they were having a major problem with their rails cracking on their issued 96 pistols. They were using a standard factory loading available to everyone - not something a factory loaded just for them.

When they called Beretta to ask how the factory would resolve these cracked rails, which were becoming more and more frequent, allegedly they were told the issued round was too hot, and it was not the factory's problem.

I am sort of thinking out loud, and have no first hand knowledge, but if cracked rails were becoming a real issue for the factory on the 96s, that may help to explain that decision.

Roadster I agree totally with you on steel pistols. All of the ones I carry on or off duty are on steel frames. I am sure even though they are fired often, they will all outlive me. Maybe I am just an old fart, but a pistol built on a steel frame just feels right in my hand. The others just feel odd, and I do not shoot them as well.

Just my thoughts, I am sure others my disagree. That's fine if they prefer the new lighter pistols. Still a good reason why they sell a ton of Fords and Chevys each day.

twoguns
 
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Some of us just don't like or care for the plastik pistolen that are all the rage today.
You got that right.

Roadster I agree totally with you on steel pistols. All of the ones I carry on or off duty are on steel frames. I am sure even though they are fired often, they will all outlive me. Maybe I am just an old fart, but a pistol built on a steel frame just feels right in my hand. The others just feel odd, and I do not shoot them as well.
The reason the handgun manufacturers are pushing plastic-framed handguns is due to one thing: Profits.

It is far cheaper to squirt some molten plastic into a mold than it is to machine a frame from an investment casting and, especially, a forging. But you will notice that plastic-framed pistols are not much cheaper --- in many cases, no cheaper --- than their metal-framed equivalents. Hence, more profit.

There will always be honest-to-God metal-framed handguns on the market, because those like us in civilian sector are too large of a market to ignore.
 
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I'm pretty sure HK stopped production of the P7 series. So there goes that. I just so happen to love my polymer framed USP. I still prefere the feel of a steel frame in my hand, but in many cases the polymer frames with outlive steel ones. I still wouldn't be suprized if a Sig had a longer service life than my USP, but my Beretta 96 headed downhill fast. And while yes, it may be cheaper to squirt plastic into a mold than machine a block of steel, it still took a signifigant amount of money in development costs to design and test those "cheap plastic" frames. I would say in the millions of dollars for companies like H&K, who has been making polymer guns the longest, and Glock, who is right next in line.
 

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I have always sort of filed this one in that file drawer makred ... things that make you go hmmmm.

Back in the late 80s, the guy in charge of our firearms program at headquarters had a friend in the FBI. The FBI had just spend big dollars on an evaluation program to select their first issued semi pistol. They wanted to replace their 3" model 13 revolvers. The FBI reviewed all the availabe major designs on the market and that point in time, and published a fairly thick book type report on that process.

I was carrying a steel framed Smith auto at the time, and I wanted to see how they compared steel to alloy or polymer pistols. They concluded for law enforcement duty weapons, the average expected service life for a steel framed pistol was 100,000 rounds of duty ammo. They concluded both alloy and polymer frames would yield a service life of 40,000 rounds of duty ammo.

I do recall they only considered traditional DA/SA pistols, along with the Glock. Meaning they did not test nor consider pistols like 1911s or BHPs. They had a fairly complex formula for arriving at their estimated service life figures.

Right now I can not recall all those details, and my copy of their evaluation report was destroyed with my house in Hurricane Andrew. But I do remember grinning when their study selected the P226 Sig as their first issued semi. I own 2 Sigs and think they are excellent pistols. My favorite is a 226R in stainless on a steel frame - which will be a keeper.

Pistols are thankfully like motor vehicles to me. They make enough brands, models and colors that everyone will eventually find the handgun that suits them best. For me that is a steel frame pistol, and I have a marked preference for SA triggers. These just feel "right" in my hands, and I control them very well during rapid fire. But in fairness I learned to shoot a pistol using a 1911.

For those shooters who don't like steel SA pistols, just keep walking around the car lot and you will find something that suits your fancy.

Mr. Jonas, sorry to hijack your thread sir, but the steel/alloy/polymer comments reminded me of this evaluation report.

twoguns
 

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pistolero,

I lurk on at parkcities site which has a forum for the HK P7 series pistols. These guys are quite knowledgeable about what is going in with P7 pistols. In 2005 HK announced that they would make one "small" production run of P7M8's in early 2006 and cease production. But apparently HK has changed their minds on the P7. Now is seems that there will be a 2007 production run of P7M8's.

The prices for these last year P7's are high. About $1500 MSRP.

I guess that if HK can continue to make a profit from the P7, they will manufacture just enough of them to keep the demand up. Comes the day when the demand drops below whatever is the acceptable level, it will be time to kiss the P7 goodbye for the last time.

Maybe.....


Roadster
 
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. . . . . but my Beretta 96 headed downhill fast.
So, what went wrong with it?


They make enough brands, models and colors that everyone will eventually find the handgun that suits them best. For me that is a steel frame pistol, and I have a marked preference for SA triggers. These just feel "right" in my hands, and I control them very well during rapid fire. But in fairness I learned to shoot a pistol using a 1911.
Me too. But maybe we're just dinosaurs. ;)
 

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twoguns,

Like you, I love all steel SA pistols. Not many being produced these days.

Here is what I own in all steel SA:

Colt Mark IV 70 Series .45 ACP Gov't Model
Colt Mark IV 70 Series .45 ACP Gold Cup
Colt Mark IV 70 Series .38 Super Gov't Model
Colt Combat Commander 9mm
Colt 80 Series Delta Elite 10mm
Colt 3rd Issue Woodsman .22 LR Target

S&W SW1911 .45 ACP (two)
S&W M52-2 .38 Spl wadcutter
S&W M41 .22 LR Heavy Barrel Target

Browning Medalist .22 LR
Browning HP Mark II .30 Luger
Browning HP Mark III 9mm Luger
Browning HP Mark III .40 S&W

CZ-52 7.62x25 Tok

Sig P210-6 9mm Luger

HK P7M8 9mm Luger

Mauser Parabellum 9mm Luger (this is the 1968 repro of the Swiss 06/29 Luger)

I guess you could say I have a thing for all steel auto pistols.....


Roadster
 

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Jonas,

The Beretta 92 Compact series is out of production. The rest of the series is not. I would look for one if you have your heart set on it...there are still a few in new or like new condition out there. Magazines will be getting harder to come by which is why I have six tucked away for mine. Springs are the same as used in the full sized guns.
Hit me off line if you have questions.

Wes
 

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Best things have an end... and the Compact was the best of the line, in my opinion. Not so compact, but a good service-sized (BHP) pistol with extreme reliability for the 3 I owned: 1 SB (why did I sold it?) and 2 FS.

L.
 

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Larry,

I'm carrying mine, but in a couple weeks will go back to the 1911, again. After I teach the Beretta class...

It's a keeper for no other reason than it's out of production.

Wes
 
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I picked up a "Custom Carry II" on a trade; I wanted a rust resistant pistol to replace a SIG232 an 9mm. The pistol is great, but 8 round magazines are very expensive!
 
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