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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there all,

I am comtemplating buying the SIG P-239 for a concealed carry handgun chambered in .357 SIG. Are there any P-239 owners out there or former owners.



I'd like to get some pros/cons and will look at possibly buying one based on some of the responses that I get from forum members.

My concern is hand size and fit, because I have larger than average mitts. Also, I'd like to try the .357 SIG caliber as I have little or no experience with it.

Best,

Chris
 

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Chris

I have one in 9mm which I love. It is one of, if not the most, accurate handguns I've owned.

I was drawn to the P239 for the grip. I just don't like the thicker grips on some of the double stack SIG's. I would try to find one to at least hold to see if it fits your hand first.

Not having ever shot a .357 SIG, I can't comment on the caliber.

Good luck,

Stan
 

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Well, SIGs are SIGs, and it says a lot.

I had very good experiences with the previous single stack model, the P225. And only exchanged it for a Walther P5 - says a lot too in my opinion. The P239 is more compact.

Bye.
 

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I had one, in 357 Sig.
I liked it. I've had maybe eight Sigs and the P239 had the best trigger, especially in DA. I liked the grip shape really well also. I never had a malfunction. It shot great groups, and I attribute that to the grip and trigger, which made things easy.

It's hard for me to keep from comparing it to the P225. You will hear a lot of people who love the P225, and it's almost a cult item with Sig fans. But I had a P225 and the P239 at the same time, and preferred the 239. I know it isn't fair to compare only one of each model, but I liked the P239 I had better than the P225 I had, mostly because of the grip and trigger, but I thought it's more rounded shape was easier to carry also.

If there is a disadvantage to it, it's needing a magazine specifically for the 357 Sig...maybe. Most other 40 or 357 Sig guns can be swapped between those calibers by just a barrel change, and the magazine stays the same. The P239 uses a different magazine for 40 and 357.
However- I never tried using a 40 magazine with my 40 barrel, so can't say that it absolutely will not work.

I guess another bad thing about the 357 Sig P239 is noise. It is a loud little thing. My wife always knew when i was shooting it in our woods. But when you compare it to a 4" 357 Magnum revolver, which it's ballistically similar to, it's almost quiet!

I traded mine away because I have mostly gotten away from DA autos, and have been using another gun (HK P7M8) when I need one of that physical size. I just wasn't using it anymore.
 

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I just noticed you mentioned having large hands.
I don't know how the grip will feel to you, but you may find the trigger guard might be a bigger problem. It may feel a little cramped to you.
But then, it may not.
 

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Hello Chris,

With large hands, you should also try a P229. I shot one at the range and it had the very best DA trigger I ever tried. Short and light travel, a true mechanical marvel.

Bye.

L.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello Larry,

I will try the grip on the P-229 and thank you for the advise.

I called my local gunshop yesterday and they wanted $995.00 for the P239 in .40 S&W, which is about $200.00 more than what I can get it from other sources.

Regardless, I will go to the shop this week and "try out" some other SIG firearms.

Chris
 
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I called my local gunshop yesterday and they wanted $995.00 for the P239 in .40 S&W, which is about $200.00 more than what I can get it from other sources.
Wholesale on Sigs runs in the $500-600 range. Clearly, your "local gunshop" is taking advantage of your loyalty. "Let yer fingers do the walkin' through the Yellow Pages" and find a gun shop that will cut you a fair deal on the item you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hello Larry,

Sad but true!


More expensive than in bankers' paradise!!!
SIG handguns have alway's commanded a premium in the US market. Maybe someday, the P-210's will get surplused from Switzerland and Imported. I am sure they would sell for $900.00/+dollars US>

Even the P-225's that were used by the former West German Police and recently imported by PW Arms of Redmond, WA are fairly expensive.

Chris
 

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Chris, I hope you don't mind if I alert you to my experience with the .357 SIG caliber. I had one of the first Glock 33s, and I put over 2000 rounds of factory new .357 SIG ammo through it.

Reliablility is outstanding. You're shoving a 9mm pole into a 10 mm hole. No jams in all those rounds.

The caliber is a blaster. Loud. People would come over to see what the heck I was shooting. The concussion from the blast would thump me on the chest, just like the thump I get from full-bore .357 mag ammo. This all took a bit of getting used to. It is NOT a gun for a newbie. This is no problem for you, but - for instance - my wife absolutely refused to shoot it. This was an issue one time when she was in the house and wanted a gun because of some weird goings-on outside, and the only easily accessible and loaded handgun in the safe was the Glock 33. She wouldn't take it out because she remembered how scary it was. Unacceptable - I traded it away later that week.

The ammo is expensive. No one makes it cheap. And not as easy to reload for as a straight-walled case.

Here's what bothered me about the caliber, and why I wouldn't go back to it. Maybe it's changed, but I found that bullet set-back was a problem. Now, remember that I was shooting before they started cannelluring the .357 SIG bullets, but I'd have bullets start smashing back into the case after being run through the action. At the pressures this round is running, this scared the heck out of me - I was always a little terrified that I'd blow my gun up with a shrunken round that I hadn't caught.

Anyway, I just wanted you to know about my experience with the .357 SIG.

By the way, I've been wanting a P 239 for a while now. I love the action, and I love the way they feel in my hand, and I love the way they shoot. I'd probably get a 9mm or a .40, but I have thought about going back to the .357 SIG. I probably wouldn't, but one never knows. I look forward to seeing what you decide to do, my friend. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hello Erich,

As you know, I put a great deal of stock in your observations and you have never failed to steer me in the right direction.

I went the range this morning and handled a P-239 for the first time. As I surmised, the grip frame is short for my larger than average mitts putting the arch of the grip into the center of my hand meaning that any hard recoiling rounds are going to be fairly painful. The SIG was in .40 S&W. At the same time, I picked up a P-229 and found the grip to be much more comfortable. I do like the fact that the SIG sits "higher" in my hand and allows me to access the sights fairly rapidly.

When I told the gunshop guy what I was looking for, he opined that he wouldn't own one because the cartridge is very difficult to locate in this area "on the shelf". As a matter of fact, the range stocked very little of this particular caliber because the demand for it was very low.

As far as dimensions, the SIG does not offer any real advantages over my current Glock 23 for concealed carry.

Chris
 

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To parrot Erich, I had some problems with bullet set-back in the 357 Sig, but failed to mention that.
I generally keep my carry gun loaded at all times, since I wear it all day and keep it handy at night. If you will be using the gun that way, it shouldn't be a problem. But, if you unload/reload the gun often, it probably will be. It only takes a couple of chamerings to seat that bullet deeper with the 357 Sig's small neck (and therfore less friction and tension).

As availability went, I found USA and UMC in my regular gunshop, so it wasn't too bad. If I had to go elsewhere if they had ran out, like a WalMart or something, I may have had trouble. Although- I did see some in a SuperWalMart recently. I wasn't looking for it, but it grabbed my attention.
I can't recall what it used to cost me, but I'm thinking it was around 45ACP prices. I may be wrong there, because I got a bunch of USA early on at a "deal", and didn't have to buy for a while.

By the way, both of my 357 Sigs (P239 and P229) liked CorBon 125s, and Gold Dot 125s. Really liked them.

I never reloaded a single round (I was too cheap to buy dies), but I hear it's a pain. The problem I usually hear mentioned is case walls collapsing. That shoulder is like a pre-buckled point, and it just crunches from there.

Apparently, a lot of 357 Sig shooters use a .40 barrel to get around these problems. They claim to usually practice with the .40 barrel in the gun. The ammo is more available, cheaper to buy, and easier to reload for. You'll have to see if that's practical for you.
I got my 229 used, and it came with a .40 barrel. I still shot 357 more, mostly because I had more.
 

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Hello Chris,

I do not want to deceipt but you won't see Swiss surplus P210s. These guns (P49 in the official nomenclature) are given for free to the officers when they retire. Those that you see in gun shops, complete with holster and reserve mag, have been resold by old officers or their family. They go for 1100 francs minimum (800 $) and the source is drying as most officers still in service have received P220s (P75).

Only real P210 surplus we have seen were Danish army's and German border's. The former came in a batch, refinished by SIG and sold in a nice blue box for 1800 francs.

The German Polices P225s were a real deal for 400 francs, but they are dryed now... Wait for Swiss and Dutch polices'.

Bye.

L.
 

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Hello Larry,

I will try the grip on the P-229 and thank you for the advise.

I called my local gunshop yesterday and they wanted $995.00 for the P239 in .40 S&W, which is about $200.00 more than what I can get it from other sources.

Regardless, I will go to the shop this week and "try out" some other SIG firearms.

Chris
Chris,
That's MSRP plus at least 10%!!!
You can do better than that even with shipping!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hello Larry and Denfoote,

I called Southern Ohio Guns and the P-225's that were previously advertised were already sold out!

As for the pricing at the local shooting range/gunshop, they have a "history" of inflating higher end guns beyond the MSRP and many times I have "spirited discussions" on their asking prices. Business for them is very good and they really don't seem to want to negotiate on a lot of their newer items.

As for the SIG P-210's, they are "more gun" than I can afford at collector's prices and I can find "other" SIG's used from time to time for significantly less. I passed over a SIG 220 last month for $495.00 in "good" condition. They do crop up from time to time around here and I will be patient in my search.

Chris
 
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ChrisStephens, have you held a P239 in your hand? I own a P239 40 S&W and it feels like a brick in my hand. Have you ever shot a Compact 357 Sig? I have a conversion barrel for both my Glock 23 and 27: they both kick. roar, and spit fire. Are they fun? YOU BETCHA! Regards, Richard
 

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This thread sure shows why you have to handle a gun before buying. I like the feel of the P239, while some apparently do not. Likewise, I was not that happy with the grip of the two P228s and one 229 I had, but others feel differently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hello BarryinIN,

I guess I'm old enough to admit that I suffered through many years of "Buyer's Remorse" before I had access to the internet. For my purposes:

1. I try every handgun to see if it "fits" my handsize.
2. I make certain that I am comfortable with the reach of the trigger.
3. I make certain that the sight alignment and grip is "natural" without repositioning my hand.

I have made some "painful" choices before and I will heartily agree that individual ergonomics is one of the biggest factors in handgun purchases.

My hands are very wide and I had a very poor experience with a SIG P-232 that I purchased one time. The "arch" of the grip recoiled straight into the nerve plexus of my palm. I am afraid that I will have similiar results with the P-239.

Chris
 
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