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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I didn't want to test my newly acquired Colt 1903 with the "original" glued back grips, I took another 7,65 at the range on friday, an old Mauser HSc, probably made in 1943, with a finish that tells nothing but inspires a lot...

That nice little piece of machined steel has the sorry habit to bite as hell, so I shot with gloves. It doesn't improve accuracy but I still found the DA pull very manageable. It is unique in having a deliberate click audible and feelable just before the drop, intented to stage the pull for accurate job in DA. And it works. The SA is good, with an extremly short reset that allows quick followings.

The sights doesn't played with, with shallow rear and front hidden in a sighting groove. With attention, I managed 2 cm. triangles at 10 meters.

I always had something for this little Mauser. It might appear overengineered but was a interesting attempt to catch on Walther PP/PPKs market share. Alex Seidel (of later HK-fame) was a young and unexperienced engineer at Mauser when he received the task of developping a new modern pocket handgun in the middle of the 30s. He confessed later that he slept for monthes with a Walther PP under his pillow to impregnate with genius!

The result might appear strange in form, function and realisation. The gun is influenced by the streamline movement (in opposition to Walther's Art Deco lines) with a tapered trigger guard, streamlined hammer that covers its grove, groved sighting line. It has a mag safety, a detachable barrel. The thumb safety blocks the trigger in DA but allows to pull it in SA to drop the hammer, it puts the firing out of reach of hammer. The field stripping is strange too, the hammer must be cocked and the safety on safe, then you push on a catch in the trigger guard and pull slightly the slide to the front. It comes up after a few mm.

If you have the opportunity, handle it and even shot it, you might be surprised. And beware of the hammer!

L.
 
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I, too, am a fan of the Mauser HSc and have three of them. Now-defunct importer Interarms marketed them over here from the late 1960's to the early 1980's, so they are fairly common on the used market. They are still a "racy"-looking handgun 67 years later. Traditional-German design and craftsmanship, and honest-to-God steel. All gone. More's the pity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And I forget to mention the automatic slide catch: when you insert a new mag, the slide closes automatically and loads a fresh round in the barrel.

Alan, do you have 7,65 or 9 mm. models? WW2 or post-WW2?

On its site, italian manufacture Renato Gamba still mentions the HSc. In the past, they made some pieces for Mauser before getting the licence and developping a hi-cap "Super HSc".

Look at:

http://www.renatogamba.it

L.
 
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Interarms-imported blued .380 ACP and a nickel-finished .32 ACP, both in their boxes with paperwork and test targets. (The test target for the .32 ACP is serial-numbered to another gun though. Musta got mixed up with another HSc's target in the gun shop or the factory.) And also a Nazi-marked one with near-mint metal finish and a single ding on the wood grips I picked up about a year ago. All enough for me for this "incarnation." ;)

Around here you very infrequently run across the high-capacity variant of the HSc that Renato Gamba made under license from Mauser, but in the opinion of some --- including me ---- the much bigger grip frame greatly detracted from the model as a pocket auto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello Alan,

I'm with you about the hi-cap HSc by Gamba, they destroyed the nice lines of the original piece with the big grip and the hook trigger guard. I read somewhere that Post-War HScs have a "two pieces grip". I understand that the backstrap is a seperate part, right? Is it steel? Do your HScs have a hole in the heel for a lanyard? My 863xxx doesn't have it. Probably a cost-production war measure, like the thin machine marks and the thin blue finish.

How about this one by Ralph Bone:





Bye.

L.
 

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I always thought they were kinda neat.
I didn't even realize that Gamba was HSc-based until now, it's so different looking.

Larry, that Ralph Bone engraved one is very nice. Yours?
 

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Hello Larry,

That would be a "prize" collector's piece.

I've only shot an HSC once when teaching a coworker to shoot her Dad's hand-me-down Mauser. As I recall, it was pleasant to shoot. She traded it for a Taurus Model 85.

Back then, it seemed like the right thing to do!

Best,

Chris
 

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Hello Larry,

Back then, I didn't know any better......and I was caught up in the 1911 craze!

Chris
 

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I took my wife shopping for her first hand gun and she picked the Mauser .380 Hsc. She has carried it for most of the last 28yrs or so. She is a very good shot with it, as she has practiced a lot. It has proven to be very trust worthy weapon.
 
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Hello Alan,

I read somewhere that Post-War HScs have a "two pieces grip". I understand that the backstrap is a seperate part, right? Is it steel? Do your HScs have a hole in the heel for a lanyard? My 863xxx doesn't have it. Probably a cost-production war measure, like the thin machine marks and the thin blue finish.

L.
Larry --- Belatedly getting back to this issue:

Yes, my post-war (probably 1970's-imported or thereabouts) commerical HSc's have a backstrap separate from the rest of the frame. You have to take the grips off to really see this as the contact between the parts are very finely-machined hairline joints, one under the tang under the hammer and the other at the back of the magazine well. The backstraps are steel.

Actually, it looks like a lot more machining is involved to produce the two parts rather than the single frame and I suspect that it was done to make access to and assembly/disassembly of the hammer spring and hammer spring strut simpler and easier as the pin that pins the bottom of the backstrap to the frame also goes through the bottom of the hammer spring strut, holding it in place.
 
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