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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Am I the ONLY one on the Forum thats in love with the .32 S&W Long?

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I have a deep and abiding love for this old round. It is in excellent "plinker," target round, (duh!) and not too shabby for quick multiple shots on an adversarial target. In it's most powerful configuration, it can crank out about 150 fpe with excellent accuracy (better than the factory .32 ACP loadings.)

The .32 S&W Long (.32 Colt New Police) is a great cartridge. Why it isn't more popular is beyond me. Any thoughts?

Scott
 

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I guess .32 Long doesn't work out well for many of us. Because the revolvers that shoot it aren't everyday common and the ammo itself isn't cheap unless you reload.

I certainly don't have anything against it, but like .38 S&W I find the cartridge to just be too rare to use it.

-Rob
 

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I like the .32 a lot.

It's a piss-poor 'stopper' with factory loads but does OK on small game with Keith-style reloads or Lapua wadcutters.

I have a 2" S&W Model 30 that doesn't group with factory loads but is OK with Georgia Arms jacketed loads. Fun plinker, and great for finishers on deer.

Also have a Colt Police Positive Target 6" with bead and U-notch sights (normal targets sights for 1915) that shoots nice. Great small game gun.

Have a .32 Hand Ejector First Model that doesn't get shot; not the strongest design. Pull-pin locking and the cylinder stop in the topstrap thats actualted by the hammer (usually). Nice example of the very first Hand Ejector. They changed it radically the first chance they got, to the configuration we see today.

Fun little guns.


Regards,

Pat
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just finished fondling my wife's "I" frame 1905 .32 Hand Ejector. The little revolver is so svelte, so concealable. While it has a 4.25" barrel, a similar revolver with S&W's 2.25" barrel could easily dissappear into a coat pocket or waistband.

By the same token, a Colt Pocket Positive with a 4" barrel could vanish as quickly on any person.

Damn, that is one sweet revolver! We need more!

Scott
 

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Hello. It's been years and I'm not up on the older S&W revolvers, but a friend let me shoot an older S&W that had a 4" bbl (I think) several years ago. It was accurate in the extreme, although I do not know what his handload was.

Handguns do not have to be "man stoppers" to be loads of fun, at least for me.

Best.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The small frame is a true "money maker" when it comes to undercover narcotics agents and recoil sensitive individuals. As I said, the advances in modern metallurgy would permit the use of a, dare I say it, "+P type" loading for the .32 S&W Long. This would eliminate the need for moving up to a "J" sized frame with a cylinder window necessary to accomodate the .32 H&R Magnum (and .38 S&W Special) length of cartridges.

I think that this would be an excellent concept. Bringing original revolver specificarions to greater strengths, thus enhancing the perameters of the cartridge's performace levels without increasing the size of the launching platform.

Scott
 

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Whilst I'd love to see more .32's made, a +P .32S&W I frame ain't gonna happen.

There are way too many old breaktops in dubious condition floating around for them to develop a hot load that would still fit in the clunkers.

When S&W dropped the I frame, they were still selling a few guns in it; it just made more sense at the time to consolodate frame sizes. Perhaps today with CNC equipment it would be less of a problem.

A good many departments have rules against carrying a .32 revolver, no matter how powerful it is. Friend who was looking at the .32 H&R in a Centennial ran up against it.

I do agree that it's the equal of the .32ACP in most loads. Why prople accept the .32ACP and not the .32S&W is a mystery to me.

If they were to resurrect the I frame a natural caliber would be 9mm Para. Cylinder length isn't an issue, velocities are nearly that of a 4" auto, full ejection with a 2" barrel, fast reloads with 5 shot moon clips; whats not to like?


Regards,

Pat
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is my simple proposition:

Take a 98 grain bullet (preferably WC or SWCHP configuration) load it into a .32 S&W long case to a velocity of 1000 fps, (from a 4" barrel) and denote it as a .32 S&W Long (+P) loading. Emblazon the box with a red sticker as did IMI on some .38 S&W Special loadings "only for use in revolvers chambered for .357 S&W Magnum." Said sticker would read "only for use in revolvers cambered for .32 H&R Magnum or as stated by the manufacturer."

Such a load would yield 217 fpe from a 4" barrel and from a 2 1/2" barrel should squeeze out 925 fps and 186 fpe. This should be more than adequate for self defense applications. Works for me!

Would that work for you?

Scott
 

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Heya Scott,

It would work fine for me, but the lawyers at the ammo company ain't gonna go for it.

Even junker .38 Specials (which are nearly all solid frame) will stand a few hot loads. Topbreaks won't.

I'm with you on wanting it, but not gonna hold my breath.

Regards,

Pat
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I believe that most knowledgeable shooters would realize that the old "top-break" revolvers are old and fragile. Aging metal and high pressures don't mix. Modern revolvers, (1961 and newer) are still relatively strong, and can take higher-pressure loads. Even the Federal Wadcutters in .32 S&W Long that yield 780 fps and 130 fpe from a 4" tube are not too stout for most of the revolvers that were manufactured before 1905 (black powder vintage revolvers.)

The modern revolvers (the Colt Detective Specials and Modern "J" frames) can take much higher pressures than the original .32 S&W Long loadings dish out on a regular basis. A new run of high-strength "I" frame revolvers could breathe new life into the concept of a +P version of the .32 S&W Long.

This is an idea that will increase the versatility of the.32 H&R Magnum even further. For those that either don't handload, or that wish to use a more potent .32 S&W Long for personal defense would prove itself to be an excellent choice.

Scott
 

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Heya Scott,

"most knowledgeable shooters" ain't who the lawyers are worried about.

If it fits in a junker, someone _will_ use it.

Look at the whole lineup fo cartridges that aren't loaded to their potential for that very reason.


Regards,

Pat
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Agreed. If a fool is sufficiently persistent, he'll eventually get himself in deep "caca."

Scott
 

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late getting in on this but i use a 60gr Gold Dot on top of 3.2 gr of 700x for approx 1025,3 inch barrel for a fpe of @140. hope this helps Doug
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What are you shooting, Doug? Is it a S&W, "I", or "J"? Is it an Iver Johnson? Colt's Pocket Positive? Police Positive? Harrington and Richardson? What have you? ???

Scott
 

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Gunfan,it is a Rossi Model 69 3in with rudimentary adjustable sights I have two of the darned things they do grow on you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Isn't it a pip? It just seems to "tuck away" and make itself VERY convienient and the most opportune time, doesn't it? LOL! (Ain't it the gospel truth though?)

Scott
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mitch:

That little Safety Hammerless looks like a great deal of shooting fun! Have you tried using .32 S&W ammunition in it? If you start loading for the .32 S&W, (and the Long) a pound of powder will last you well over a thousand-two-hundred-fifty rounds! :)

Not only can they be good, clean, fun. These revolvers can be used for pest eradication, euthanizing animals, etc.

Enjoy that Safety Hammerless.

Scott
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Whilst I'd love to see more .32's made, a +P .32S&W I frame ain't gonna happen.

There are way too many old breaktops in dubious condition floating around for them to develop a hot load that would still fit in the clunkers.

When S&W dropped the I frame, they were still selling a few guns in it; it just made more sense at the time to consolodate frame sizes. Perhaps today with CNC equipment it would be less of a problem.

A good many departments have rules against carrying a .32 revolver, no matter how powerful it is. Friend who was looking at the .32 H&R in a Centennial ran up against it.

I do agree that it's the equal of the .32ACP in most loads. Why prople accept the .32ACP and not the .32S&W is a mystery to me.

If they were to resurrect the I frame a natural caliber would be 9mm Para. Cylinder length isn't an issue, velocities are nearly that of a 4" auto, full ejection with a 2" barrel, fast reloads with 5 shot moon clips; whats not to like?


Regards,

Pat
Thanks, Pat.

Perhaps I sound like a "dinosaur," but I can't seem to get over the fact that the average american handgunner has been "Magnum-ized" (read: gone power mad) since the 1972 cinematic release of Warner Brother's rendition of Julian Fink's novel "Dirty Harry."

Little do they realize that from the mid 1800's throughl the 1960's that numerous "bad guys" have "bitten the big one" through a well-placed small bore bullet!

The NYPD Police Matrons, from the 1920's through the 1960's carried S&W's .32 Regulation Police, .32 Hand Ejector, Colt's Police Positive and Pocket Positive while performing their courhouse duties. There were a number of occasions when a "flurry of fire" from a .32 S&W Long (.32 Colt New Police) settled the situation... pemanently!

These cartridges are too good, too 'convenient' in their broad applications to fade into obsolecence. The .32 H&R Magnum, .32 S&W Long even the lowly .32 S&W still have their place in the grand scheme in american handgunning.

Scott
 
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