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Ladies'n'Gents,

I asked my dad if he's already gotten his fishing license. He said "yes." I was a bit downcast so I persevered: "I was going to see if you'd get your small game license as well, a couple bucks more, so we could go hunting this coming season." Dad: "That's what I did get."

The conversation progressed: He did get his hunting and fishing combination license and when asked if I get another .22 he'll go hunting with me, he said, "Possibly." That's my dad's version of "yes, I don't want to make any promises, but most likely since I got the dang thing."

Dad's 55. What we hunt is usually relatively thick. Therefore I do not use a scope but I can see the iron sights well enough. Dad uses reading glasses when reading, on the computer, or for any close up work like soldering. Soooo.... I need suggestions fellas. I'm new at setting guns up for older folk. I'm thinking an aperture rear with a DayGlow front or a 2.5x 'scope would work well.

I'm also thinking about a red dot; that may be the ticket but the models I've seen are a bit imprecise with their 3-5 MOA dots. I don't like them anyway. Dad might. I'm very concerned about being able to head shoot squirrel with open sights at 25 meters; he may be content with doing that with something less precise.

Additionally, Mom is no longer anti-hunting. I told her that the home herd needs culled and she said she loves venison. She just doesn't want to see the deer be shot. I said no problem. The squirrel, rabbit, and deer I'll take are meats that will fit into the "healthy lifestyle" they've adopted since my dad's cancer surgery.

I will say that Dad has the Smith eye. He taught me to hunt and shoot then turned me loose.

I can't prove it but I think this is one of the things he gave up for my mother, and as a teenager I remember him going to bat several times for me when I wanted a new gun and could afford it.

Josh <><
 

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Open sights with eyesight problems are very difficult to use. I put TruGlow sights on my Marlin 336 but I still have to use some special glasses to focus both rear and front sight and also line up on the target.
Unless he can see open sights without special glasses you are better off looking for an optical scope.
og
 

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Hi Josh,

I'm 51 years young and still have no problems with open sights and glasses. I am one of the few lucky ones I guess.

I agree with OG. A fixed scope 2x to 4x is the way to go for close in brush hunting.

I am looking at possibly purchasing a .22 CZ 452 or a Russian Tula TOZ-78 from my local dealer to try out for small game hunting.

The last shot I took was with open sights at Groundhog at 150 yards and nailed him with open sights. If I can see it, generally I can hit it.

Chris
 

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Josh, I have a Millett Red Dot on my Ruger 10/22, and I love it. It takes some getting used to, but I love it.

Did I mention that I really like that little sight?
 

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I sure hope you and your dad get to stalk the elusive bushytail together! I cherish every moment I ever spent in the woods with my Dad (which was far too few) and my son.

I guess what would work best will depend on him and what he is used to. The combination you mention might work really well. It would have worked for my Dad before he became legally blind but then he was used to receiver sights anyway.

It would probably work for me (I am perhaps slightly older or about the same age as your dad) but I would probably opt for a low powered scope. Like a Leupold 1-4 or 1.5 to 5. Largely for the light gathering or contrast capabilities in thick woods.

For us old timers it is not so much the accuracy (I have always shot receiver sights better than scopes on paper) but for the ability to see an animated target which may scurry about and still be able to line up the single aiming point quickly.

I am just rambling here as 90% of my squirrels are taken with a 4" Pre-War Woodsman anyway. BTW that aint pre Viet-Nam for you young "whipper snappers"


Onward,
Jim
 

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At age 53, I guess I am fortunate that I can still see iron sights well enough to hunt. That is what I have on my .30-30. I am not crazy about the Marble's semi-buckhorn sight that came on it; I'd rather have a peep sight. But it does well enough.

Still and all I use a fixed 4 power scope for my squirrel gun, which is a Savage Mark II bolt-action (left-handed! Nirvana for us southpaw types.) For 90% of my shots, I would probably be OK with the iron sights. This gives me that extra margin, which I find more important when hunting tree rats than larger game. They are so quick and elusive. This gives me more options. Mine is nothing fancy, just a Bushnell. The TruGlow might do the job just as well; I haven't tried one.

OG -- I am surprised about the remark you made about focusing both rear and front sight. I just focus on the front sight, the way I was taught. The rear sight does not need to be sharp and clear; your eye can detect the position of the front sight within the outlines of the rear sight without focusing on it. It is a function of contrast, the light around the front sight contrasting with the shape of the rear sight. So I'm not sure why this matters.

However, I think I have seen the kind of glasses you are talking about, and I know some people really like them, if it's what I am thinking of. Do your glasses have a peep-sight contraption? That gives a good depth of field and would permit focusing on both.

Maybe I am just lucky that my eyes are still good enough (with regular glasses), and will unfortunately understand better what you are talking about in time to come. :-(
 
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