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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been meaning to tell you guys about a little incident that occurred last weekend. That Friday night I fell asleep watching TV on my futon. My room in the house I'm currently renting with three other guys used to be the living room, so the front door is about four feet from where I fell asleep. Well at about 6:45 am the next morning, I awoke to three sharp knock on that door. I had no idea what time it was and was trying force myself awake, so I just kind of sat up in a daze and waited for a few seconds. Then, whoever it was at the door tried the knob. Thank God I at least had the dead bolt on. Whoever it was left after that, so I just assumed it was one of my fraternity brothers being a smart-ass (pardon the french). Well, I was proved wrong when the s.o.b. came back two more time. The 2nd time was the same as the first, only afterwords I went to make sure the back door was locked up tight after he left. I even looked through the peephole in the door AS he was turning the knob and the guy was ducked off to the side or crouched below the hole. I could even hear him breathing. The third time I decided enough was enough, grabbed my SKS (currently the only gun I own) out from under the futon, popped in a half clip's wort of ammo, and let the guy, who now decided to put his shoulder into my door a few times to try to work it open, hear me charge the bolt. Thank God that was all the warning the guy needed and the last I heard from him was "Oh s***!" and some rapidly paced foot steps as he hoofed it off of my porch. I don't live in the best neighborhood, and following this incident I'll be picking up a handgun on or after November 2nd when I turn 21. Does anyone think I overreacted in this scenario, or was it probably the right thing to do? I don't have any real training on how to handle potential home invasion scenarios, so any advice I can get until I do seek training is much appreciated!

I just realized I posted this in ammo discussion forum :-[...Could one of our all-knowing moderators please move this to the general discussion section? Thanks!
 

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Hello. In my view, you did not overreact. Perhaps it was a drunk at the wrong place, but who knows? Keep the doors locked for sure when you are there alone and all the time would be best in my opinion, but that may not be possible in your situation with the other guys there.

Evidently the sound of the round being chambered in your SKS had the desired effect without having to find out the dude's intentions.

Best.
 

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If you're alive, you didn't over react. I keep my 1911 in Condition 3 for this very reason. A few years ago, I was staying with my sister after she had just moved into a new apartment in only an "ok" side of town. She had with her a .32 CZ my father had lent her for her time in college. It was about 3am and we were both fast asleep...when a man came pounding on the door. He was screaming obscenities and my sister stood fast behind the dead bolted door and dialed the police. Then as the man continued to yell she ordered him to leave and racked the slide on the small .32. It was loud enough...he heard the round being chambered and split in a hurry!

So, to this day I keep one firearm Condition 1 for instantenous use and one Condition 3...if someone pounding on my door, I'd rack the slide and hope perhaps that would be enough, but should something be happened before I can rack that slide, I have another pistol ready to roll.

-Rob
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input, gentlemen. I figured hearing from those of you who have been there before would help me decide how to handle crap like this in the future, and I definately figured right! At the moment I'm leaning towards a BHP MKIII 9mm in SFS. I figure it's all the benefits of a single action auto with an extra safety thrown in to make up for my relative inexperience in carrying. As incoherent as I can be when I first wake up ::), the last thing I want is an accidental discharge!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why not just get the standard MkIII?

I guess it counts as an extra safety, but the SFS really seems to me to be a solution looking for a problem.

Let's get the operating principal of this thing straight;

You flip on the safety, the hammer goes to half cock, you flip it off, it goes to full cock.

So, if I turn on the safety, the gun will not fire, but if I turn it off, it will fire.

Now, let's look at the normal MkIII.

If I turn on the safety, the trigger will not release the still fully-cocked hammer, but if I turn it off, it will.

So, if I turn on the safety, the gun won't fire. If I turn it off, it will fire.

Wow... what a drastic difference -- the SFS manages to look safer without accomplishing anything. The gun will operate in exactly the same manner as it would were the SFS not present. You activate the safety, the gun will be disabled. You deactivate the safety, the gun will be enabled.

All FN managed to do with that thing was make the gun more mechanically complicated, and make dissassembly more difficult. And what's going to happen, one day, when the half cock notch on the hammer of someone's SFS Hi-Power sheds that last little micron of metal that time has so worn away by its constant flipping back and forth between the two? How ironic that the engaging of a safety device should cause an accidental discharge.

Ironic -- and potentially tragic.

You ARE the safety, and no number of switches, levers, buttons, or cute little tricks that your gun might do when they're flipped is going to change that.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wraith, is there a local CCW course you could take? If local training isn't practical, there are some decent books out there on home defense.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
chubbypigeon,
Very good point, however the price difference remains a big factor for me. I've seena ton of brand new SFS's at various gunshows listed at $400, while standard MK III's seem to be in the $550+ range. Being a college student, price is a huge issue for me. On the other hand, I 'd be buying the gun after my 21st birthday so I may have a little extra cash to throw at the problem.

enipd804,
I have a business card or two some where with an instructor's number on it. I'll have to save up for the course too! I figure in an absolute SHTF scenario, I've got about 2 years or so of shotokan/aikido experience with a little bit of knife training thrown in and my Gerber combat covert folder is usually within reach. Best damn knife I've ever owned!
 

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You handled your situation very well, only one of about two million instances per year when the mere presence of a gun, or more accurately, the implied presence managed to prevent a crime. I've seen whole crowds of dangerous folk calmed down into sheepishness by one determined individual in the dark who racked the action of a 12 bore Ithaca; I reckon the SKS had the same effect.

Best of luck on finding a Browning. I can't think of any centerfire pistol that would make a better "first gun." Okay, maybe a CZ75 or a 1911... :)
 

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Re: SFS operation


Let's get the operating principal of this thing straight;

You flip on the safety, the hammer goes to half cock, you flip it off, it goes to full cock.

So, if I turn on the safety, the gun will not fire, but if I turn it off, it will fire.
That is an incorrect explanation of the SFS system.

1. You don't "flip on" a SFS safety. As a matter of fact it is not referred to as a "safety", it's called a "cocking lever". To put the pistol on safe you thumb the hammer down. This engages the cocking lever into the safety notch on the slide. You do not put your thumb on the cocking lever to make an SFS safe.

2. The SFS hammer when pushed forward, goes to "safe", not half cock. The SFS is the only factory snag free hammer I'm aware of for the Hi Power. Definitely a consideration with concealed carry.

3. Disassembly is slightly different, but no more difficult than the first time I took my nonSFS apart for cleaning.




...And what's going to happen, one day, when the half cock notch on the hammer of someone's SFS Hi-Power sheds that last little micron of metal that time has so worn away by its constant flipping back and forth between the two? How ironic that the engaging of a safety device should cause an accidental discharge.
That would be interesting because the SFS hammer does not have a half cock notch. So much for the microns.

I guess you've never fired an SFS Hi Power?
 

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+ 1 for dogtowntom's correct description of how an SFS HiPower works. I have an older HP which I upgraded with C&S's SFS kit, and I love it. Simply put, it is safer than cocked and locked, and you arm it the same way -- with a sweep of your thumb as you bring the pistol into play. Chubbypigeon, you might try one. I suspect you will not be able to tell the difference between it and a Condition One Hipower.
Some complain that the additional parts add additional breakage potential. However logical, this point is unproven. And for those who want a simple handgun, I suggest a revolver.
Cordially, Jack
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think you acted correctly. At home I kep my HK chambered but my pump shotgun loaded and unchambered. The pistol is for instant response, but the shotgun is for a warning. Nobody will ever mistake that sound for something else. It's worked before.
 

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I had never geven it much thought about how the sound of chambering a round might scare someone off. Well actually I guess I sort of did as I keep my shotgun and my Ak loaded but with nothing in the chamber. Basically my wakeup in the middle of the night scenerio involves me carrying my locked and loaded 1911 to get my children and then retrieve a rifle from the safe on the way back to my bedroom with my 17 month old.
 
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