Handguns and Ammunition Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fairly straightforward.

Which one of these two calibers would you prefer?

Personally, I like the 10mm. I makes a nice, big hole, and has velocity, to boot.
 

·
Regulator,
Joined
·
3,441 Posts
Chubbypigeon,

This is like comparing apples and pomegranites...

The 10mm is the more versitile of the two in both bullet weight and velocity.

As Stephen Camp said; it has more "hootus".

On the other hand, if you want a obnixious semi-auto .357 Magnum the Sig round is your baby.

Wes
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay, enough votes have been cast to make the point i was out to make.

It seems that just as many people like the 10mm as like the 357 SIG.

So, then, why are there so few guns made in this chambering, nowadays? Companies are making lots of guns in 357 SIG, aren't they?

Why doesn't someone revive the Bren Ten?

Why doesn't Glock strike a deal with a big-time ammunition manufacturer to have them start loading a wide range of personal defense and hunting ammunition, and get behind the Glock 20?

In short, why doesn't someone tap this market?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,867 Posts
Hello. I can only guess that the percentage of sales for either round compared to 9mm, .40, or .45 just doesn't add up to the costs for tooling up to do pistols in these two calibers.

Best.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, that's sort of what I'm saying.

If they'd build guns in 10mm, and market them well, then there'd be no problem getting ammunition sales to go up.

I understand not producing large amounts of 9x23 or other, more esoteric cartridges, but I've noted a marked interest in 10mm, and nobody is really meeting the demand.

Think about it; how many people do you know who refer to the .40 as "Short and Weak?" This seems to be a pretty obvious reference towards a desire for a return to the full-power 10mm.
 

·
Regulator,
Joined
·
3,441 Posts
chubbeypigeon,

Actually, I want a "pomegrapple"....


Had a Bren 10 I got NIB and 3 extra mags. To make a long story short...it was cool, big, clunkey, had to damn many safeties, long trigger pull, AND it was unreliable. I traded it off...

Wes
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If they were still in production, I'd have said tune it 'til it ran. With them being collector's items, though, I'd say you did the right thing.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The .357 Sig continues to flourish because it has been adopted by many law enforcement agencies. According to Massad Ayoob in the March/April 06 American Handgunner, over sixteen per cent of state-police agencies use the .357 Sig (p. 22). This figure puts the round second to the .40 S&W in popularity with law enforcement. It has performed well in the field and is chambered for a variety of compact and subcompact pistols that are easy to carry. Among private citizens, from what I have seen in my own parochial experience, the .357 Sig is not popular. When I worked in a gun store, I met only two people who carried a pistol so chambered on their permits.

As for the 10mm Auto, it has survived despite being quickly adopted and dumped by the FBI and other agencies. The pistols for it are larger and fewer in selection. Glock deserves much credit for keeping it out there when no one else would. Other manufacturers are coming around to it again, so, if you want something in 10mm Auto, you have a better choice now than five years ago. For me, the 10mm Auto is a sentimental favorite because I remember when it came out in the 1980s and eagerly followed it rise and fall in the gun press. I also think that for a handloader it is an excellent choice for a versatile cartidge of many uses. It has managed to hang on despited little, if any support from law enforcement. For better or worse, law enforcement and military sales drive the handgun business in the U.S. If law enforcement does not want it, do not expect much attention from the industry. Despite this situation, the 10mm Auto and the .38 Super Auto cartridges soldier on among sport shooters, but the rounds are not tearing up the sales charts with success. You can see this result in the modest selection of ammo and pistols for each.

What is better? My guess is that they are pretty much equal in performance, but the 10mm Auto offers more choices for bullet weights. For this reason, I prefer the 10mm Auto.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I see.

Well, I've been wavering between a .45 and a 10mm, lately. Admittedly, I think the .45 probably has a slight edge on the 10mm in "stopping power," but the 10mm generally offers more rounds in a platform of similar size.

Right now, the battle seems to be between a Springfield XD45, and a 10mm 1911. A lot of people would insist that your first 1911 should be a .45, but I just see the 1911 government and the 10mm cartridge as a match made in heaven.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
About 2 years ago, I got in on a group buy with the people over at Waltherforums for Barsto .357sig barrels for our Walther p99 .40 cals.
The barrel is fitted to my p99, and is also numbered to the serial of my gun.

They were made of Stainless, and the fit and quality is phenomenal.

As you can observe, the Barsto barrel protrudes ever so slightly as opposed to the factory Walther barrel.


This is my only experience with .357sig, but even so, I have to say I am imperssed with it's charactoristics and performance.

The walther shoots incredibly accurate with all .40 ammo, and even more so once fitted with the Barsto barrel and .357sig ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I too prefer 10mm - versatility. It MIGHT not be the social work pistol round, but I feel better in the woods with it because of bullet weight, penetration, and caliber. Shoots flat, for a semi auto concealment weapon, and I'd prefer it in a CZ75 type pistol over my beloved 1911 because of too many weapon breakages in the Delta Elite due to excessive slide velocity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,399 Posts
Hi there,

I would opt for the .357 SIG over the 10mm for the reason that should its popularity increase over time, than so would the load and bullet selections.

Chris
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
.357 Sig fits in a 9mm sized frame, 10mm doesnt. simple as that. Same reason .40 S&W killed 10mm. Many many more pistol factories turning out large numbers of 9mm sized frames compared to .45 ACP sized frames required for 10mm.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
At this point I cast a vote that put this poll at 10 and 10. I want to say neither of these calibers get the respect they deserve. I am not crazy about the 40 but I sure do like the 10mm and 357 Sig. The 357 Sig has it all: accuracy, noise, recoil, and flame. The 10mm is a gentle giant and for a woods/home defense gun it is my pick. Lastly, I voted 10mm. Regards, Richard
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I like the .357 Sig for the versatality of frame sizes. Makes a nice backup or concealed carry in mid size frames and shoots well out of a large frame. The .357 does take one more step to reload but it isn't that time consuming. I use a .40 carbide resizing die on the case body and then use the .357 Sig resizing die on the neck so no lube required. I know the recoil is subjective but for me, a .357 Sig is more manageable even though it has been on while since I last shot a 10mm. The 10mm is an excellent round and no doubt can do the job but I think overall, the .357 Sig has more going for it at this time.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Now that Wilson Combat is bringing out their CQB in the 10mm Automatic Pistol Cartridge, (available in April, 2006) you can count on an even greater revival of the round!

The 10mm will be a permanent member of Wilson's CQB "family". Yes, demand for the pistol chambered for the "hot .40" is that strong. (Ask Larry at Wilson Combat, he'll tell you the same thing)!

Scott
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'd prefer it in a CZ75 type pistol over my beloved 1911 because of too many weapon breakages in the Delta Elite due to excessive slide velocity.
Dave, haven't you heard? The problem was solved over 7 years ago. (flat-bottomed EGW firing pin stop, 10% "extra-power" mainspring (hammer spring) from Wolff Gunsprings, Inc. and a 22-pound progressive recoil spring (also from Wolff) stopped the dreaded "frame cracking").

Incidentally, the "bridge of metal' over the frame's slide stop hole is considered "vestigial" (that means unimportant, or meaningless, to you folks in Rio Linda). ::)

THERE IS NO FRAME CRACKING 'PROBLEM' ASSOCIATED WITH THE 1911-TYPE 10MM PISTOLS!

Let's lay this "urban myth" to rest, okay?!

Thank you very much! Moving right along...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,053 Posts
I have seen 1911 frames crack (have one very well used MK IV and two Commanders with hairline cracks right right now - it apparently hurts nothing). But i have never seen, nor do I know anyone who has had a Delta Elite frame crack (perhaps do to the plastic recoil spring guide???).

Of course there are far fewer 10mms out there so it might be just that there are more .45s available.

Onward,
Jim
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top