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Old 06-12-2017, 08:17 AM   #11
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Well said/explained. Thank you.

This article is over a year old, but I have found it helpful.

http://www.personaldefenseworld.com/...-by-blade-tech
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I routinely carry a sidearm because a cop is too heavy.

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Old 06-16-2017, 06:00 PM   #12
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Just saw this today. Thanks Chuntaro, Jäger for the great information on how to work on my draw. It is a about Training, and Practice in repetition drawing, slow at first like mentioned building up as you go.

Out here in the Islands. We are not allowed to practice drawing and shooting at the Range. But at least I can work on it in my house to get the basics down to the point before pulling the trigger.

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Old 06-17-2017, 09:40 PM   #13
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We are not allowed to practice drawing and shooting at the Range. But at least I can work on it in my house to get the basics down to the point before pulling the trigger.
One thing I overlooked giving recognition to was Chuntaro's suggestion to essentially build your draw backwards i.e. ensure you have a proper grip on the handgun, THEN holster it, and check where your hand and the rest of the related body parts are after that. Hell of a good idea; I am going to add that to the quiver.

Also a good way of telling if you have a properly positioned holster - the hand on the holstered handgun should feel as close to a normal position of function as possible, rather than cocked at a weird angle, etc. Of course, for a lot of reasons that is often compromised i.e. the agency/military you work for issues you what you get, better concealment, etc.

Absolutely nothing wrong with practice in the house. When I was competing fairly seriously in both rifle and handgun, I probably fired at least a hundred "dry fire" rounds for every round I fired on a range. And I was going through about 40K rounds a year at that time...

I went to the range the other day for some fun/practice, and just for giggles downloaded one of the shot timer apps that are available for Android phones - I've never timed drawing before. I wanted to get an idea of the difference between the rock solid bulletproof draw I was taught and have maintained ever since, and going as fast as I possibly could.

This is out of a thumb break holster worn OWB, not worn high or anything like that to aid concealment. Starting with arms hanging loosely at sides

With my deliberate bombproof draw, all my shots were clocked at somewhere between 2.1 and 2.4 seconds from beep to first shot. Every shot stayed in the 9 ring (~ 8"x11" oval) at 15 yards, and out of pushups territory.

Going as fast as I could - and I badly flubbed the draw a number of times while doing it - the timing was 1.8 to 2.0 from beep to first shot. A couple of times I was faking it because my grip was so badly off that sight alignment was difficult, etc. A few times I missed the safety so there was no shot. About a quarter of my shots ended up in pushup territory.

Those will look like really slow times, I suspect, to the USPSA, IDPA, etc crowd. And they probably are - I never have practiced a fast draw, just a bombproof draw.

But what it tells me is that the difference - for me - between a rock solid bombproof draw, and trying to draw as fast as possible like my hair is on fire, is about .3 of a second. That's it... just a third of a second.

For defensive/police/military shooting, I think taking that extra third of a second to get the perfect grip is time well spent.
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Old 06-17-2017, 09:51 PM   #14
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For defensive/police/military shooting, I think taking that extra third of a second to get the perfect grip is time well spent.
Amen to that. No sense trying to be as fast as lightening if you don't get a perfect grip. Only get one chance to get the grip. Most important thing in the sequence, in my opinion. In my dry-fire draw practice, I have had those times I was trying for "just a little quicker" and pulled the pistol up to eye level and had to just stop and laugh at myself. Nothing will get you killed quicker than a poor grip.
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Old 06-18-2017, 10:00 PM   #15
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Nothing will get you killed quicker than a poor grip.
I don't know if I would go quite that far. I'd put... ohhh... getting into a gunfight you could have avoided ahead of that, as one example. Fighting in the open when you're standing beside cover would be another.

But it certainly doesn't give you the best start to what is already a bad situation if you feel you need a pistol in your hand.
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Old 06-18-2017, 10:54 PM   #16
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Certainly can't disagree with any of that.
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Old 12-22-2017, 06:29 PM   #17
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More good information. Thank you all for the good information.
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Old 10-21-2019, 07:30 PM   #18
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I carry my Centennial in a Bianchi 152 Pocket Holster, which allows for a lightening fast draw if my hand is already on my revolver, which it should be if I find myself in a suspicious situation, but drawing starting with my hand outside the pocket---not so much!
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