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Old 05-30-2014, 06:38 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by chuntaro View Post
Trooper:

Reading your comments brought back some memories. About 1998, a female asked me to instruct her specifically in the use of the revolver. Her only experience with firearms was as an employee in a pawn shop. I condensed about four hours of lecture down to one and we took to a range I knew of in her county. I required that her first rounds be of the rimfire variety. She demonstrated pretty quickly she paid attention to the lecture and we moved on to centerfire. The girl was probably the best student I ever had. I let her shoot a 1911 and a 1935 that day. At the end of the day she decided on the revolver for her needs.
If she made an informed decision on what best met her needs then good for her. I'm not saying a revolver is a bad choice. However, many people arbitrarily recommend one out of hand due to the perception of it being a simple and more reliable mechanism and it's niether. As many of us can attest, reloading a revolver under stress is a more complex procedure requiring a greater degree of manual dexterity. Things also can, and do, go wrong with revolvers. The big diference is, when they do occurr they tend to be show stoppers. So, while the revolver is an adequate choice recommending one based upon the viewpoint that it's a better tool for a beginner or casual shooter is false logic.
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Old 06-23-2014, 01:31 PM   #12
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Good first gun

I've been instructing in firearms and CCW in several states for over three decades. I also had some early LE experience. Based on this, I'd suggest the revolver as a FAR, FAR better choice for a new shooter, especially one who is unlikely to practice often enough to master the details for competently and safely handling a semi-auto. Don't worry about speed reloading in a civilian context. That's an intermediate skill, and not likely to be ever needed as the stats clearly show. Spend the time on learning to shot well, and the solid hits will make reloading unnecessary.

With limited time to learn and practice, a revolver is safer to handle, clearly less likely to malfunction, needs less regular maintenance. These are points that are of paramount importance to a NOVICE shooter and all-too-often readily dismissed by experienced semi-auto shooters. The rare revolver malfunction tends to be admittedly a real pain, but to use an autoloader you need to be able to clear several types of jams, and to do so quickly and under great stress. I've seen a lot if competition and practice over the years, and rarely seen revolver problems; autoloaders just can't demonstrate that track record. By far the most common issue is short-stroking when dumping empties from a cylinder. Proper ejection technique will obviate that problem.

For example, I love and carry my Glocks or other semi-autos, and they very rarely malfunction. But I proved them first with hundreds of rounds of my carry ammo. Will your novice go to that expense and trouble? This sort of extensive trial is not needed to assure good functioning in a revolver, but is mandatory for an autoloader. Also, clearing jams in an autoloader needs to become second nature, and that requires time and regular practice. Fine for a gun enthusiast, fine for police/military. As is the need to regularly lubricate autoloaders. As Ayoob has noted, autoloaders carry a greater administrative burden compared to revolvers.

For initial instruction, one-on-one (not a class), I like to teach trigger control and sight picture using a .22 rim fire rifle. It is easy and fun, and won't promote any bad habits. It is a fun, relaxed introduction to shooting and safety. Then you can graduate to a .22 handgun or even a.38 Special with target loads. Start with lots of DA soft-shooting. This should also be done using a revolver.

The goal is make him competent with a .38 or .38/.357 revolver. A K-frame is a fine choice. A K-38 is a superb pick, and my personal choice for revolver competition (with an action job) but don't shy away from a fixed sight model such m10 or M13, and don't neglect Ruger DA! Heck, I'd prefer one of the older, larger Rugers, as size and weight will help him and has no downside if he won't be carrying it. If it has a 6" barrel (like the K-38), so much the better. If you have to buy new, a Ruger is the best value. I prefer S&W, but Rugers are widely accepted for police and military use.

Load the firearm with target wadcutters until he can handily shoot 158 grain LSWCHP (or the Speer 135 grain semi-jacketed if the barrel is 3" or shorter).

Look for a used police gun. If necessary, find one for sale online and have a local dealer handle the transfer. Look for a 3", " 4" or 6" barrel, stainless steel, and medium or heavy frame. Add some nice, full rubber Packmeyer or Hogue grips that will fit and fill his hand.

Show him how to safely dry fire at home, and he will quickly improve at the range. Ten perfect DA dry fire "shots" every day. Work to great competency at 10 yards and esp. seven yards and closer, and don't forget about low-light and flashlight use! Skip SA firing, except to teach how to safely uncock the handgun. DA-only gun is preferred for self-defense.

An fine alternative is a 12- or 20-gauge pump, loaded (with an empty chamber) and mounted above the door in a closet. Add a trigger lock and keep several keys secreted nearby. He can even unlock it every night.

Competency comes faster with the shotgun. Remember a handgun is a lower power but harder-to-master firearm.

Teach him to shoot on paper; then graduate to hand-thrown clay birds and he'll really develop a facility at shooting! Have him to mount the shotgun only after the bird is thrown. (This is good practice for anyone, as it naturally teaches "speed".) Pick a used Mossburg or Remington; although some Winchesters are fine. Try to find an 18- to 22-inch barrel. 20 gauge is the best choice, best used with 2-3/4" or eventually 3" magnum loads and no smaller than #4 Buck. Forget slugs!

Even if he doesn't plan to carry, a CCW course is recommended for added instruction in firearms , proof of competency, and especially for covering the law of self-defense. In the event of a self-defense shooting, it looks good on the record.

IMHO, his bride should also shoot any firearm in the house, or at the very least know how to confidently and safely load and unload the firearm. Even if she never anticipates employing the firearm in self-defense, this instruction and practice will make her safe with the firearm. She'll feel better about it being in the house.

Last edited by Brianm_14; 06-23-2014 at 01:57 PM. Reason: Expand on a point
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Old 07-03-2014, 01:00 PM   #13
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Buy him a wedding gift of pre-paid, enrolled basic firearm use class for him and his bride. Then participate with them in shooting, encourage more advanced classes, and let them choose the firearm that suits them best. I agree with the post above whole-heartedly. A revolver is easy to shoot but very difficult to shoot well. It'll take some dedication and practice. Rem. 870 in 20-gauge deserves a good look (If I had to do it over again, that's what I'd choose... Although I actually have a 12-gauge).
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Old 07-04-2014, 02:50 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by trooper View Post
If she made an informed decision on what best met her needs then good for her. I'm not saying a revolver is a bad choice. However, many people arbitrarily recommend one out of hand due to the perception of it being a simple and more reliable mechanism and it's niether. As many of us can attest, reloading a revolver under stress is a more complex procedure requiring a greater degree of manual dexterity. Things also can, and do, go wrong with revolvers. The big diference is, when they do occurr they tend to be show stoppers. So, while the revolver is an adequate choice recommending one based upon the viewpoint that it's a better tool for a beginner or casual shooter is false logic.
Interesting. S&W K frames at excellent prices used to be quite common, but now they're scarcer than hen's teeth here in California. With the new imprinting law going into effect and Ruger and S&W pulling out of the CA semi-auto market I'd expect more of a marketing paradigm shift back to revolvers---at least in CA. At least for non-LEOs.
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Old 07-07-2014, 08:05 AM   #15
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nice thread really so information i got here thanks for sharing that.. keep posting.
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Old 07-18-2014, 05:32 PM   #16
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Home and family protection, not a whole lot of experience, I would lean towards a pump shotgun. That's what sits in my bedroom. A 18 inch barreled, 12 ga. loaded with#4 buck. The magazine loaded, and a elastic ammo holder on the butt stock holds a few extra. Handguns require practice, a shot gun is not as hard to master. A load of 12 ga. is very intimidating to an intruder even if you miss him. A 16 or 20 would also do nicely. I would not feel hindered with a 28 ga or even a .410 bore, They have some nice .410 defensive loads for .410 revolvers on the market now and by shooting a smaller gauge gun an inexperienced shooter would not be intimidated by the larger gauges recoil.
If you are set on a handgun the K-frame S&W in 38 special or 357 mag. will be an excellent choice. Start off shootin9 38 special, a 357 mag. is a bit much and contrary to what you will be told a 38 special is a good inside the house protection round and will stop a bad guy with one well placed shot. My daughter did it, one shot, 38 spcl and bad guy is down and out.
Gary

Last edited by gwpercle; 07-18-2014 at 05:35 PM.
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Old 07-24-2014, 07:13 PM   #17
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Smith & Wesson has started making the model 66 again. K-frame, 38/357 mag. , 4 inch barrel, stainless steel , adjustable sights , might be cheaper than a collector priced old model. It will be new and it, along with a good 22 , will cover a lot of shooting needs.
If I could get some extra $$$'s I would get one in a heartbeat. I have a model 64, 38 special with fixed sights that gets the most range time, if it were a 357 mag with adjustable sights it would be better.
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