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Old 01-29-2012, 12:05 PM   #1
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Kent Lomont Died

I wasn't going to say anything here, but realized that some of you might have known him or at least recognized the name. Kent was a fixture in the Class 3 world, and a regular at the bigger Indiana gun shows until he moved to Idaho in the late 90s. He was an early participant in the Knob Creek MG shoot, and hit some of the other shoots. He was mostly known for his Class 3 business, but he was really big into big bore revolvers. He was also big into AutoMags in the 70s (like his friend down state, Lee Jurras). He wrote a two-part article for the 1973-74 Gun Digest on Auto Mags that, in my opinion, still stands as the best reference on their construction.

Here is the announcement from someone who knew him well, John Ross:

The shooting community lost one of its titans last night at about 6:30 Mountain Time when Kent Lomont died at the age of 66. Kent was in a facility in Missoula, Montana where he died of bone cancer, which had been diagnosed about 6 months ago.

Kent, originally from Fort Wayne, Indiana, moved to Salmon, Idaho in the 1990s to be where he and his father had spent summer vacations and visited with Elmer Keith starting in 1960.

In recent years, Kent was recognized as this country's most knowledgeable hands-on authority on machine guns and cannons, with more experience at rebuilding and making functional every type of full auto weapon ever made than any other living person. At machine gun shoots such as Knob Creek, Kentucky, it was a common sight to see Kent behind a Browning .30 or .50 cal., a Belgian MAG-58, or an FN Type D BAR, the barrel glowing cherry red as the gun poured round after round downrange without a stoppage.

Prior to his involvement with full auto arms, Kent was instrumental in providing development work for the late Harry Sanford, inventor of the original Auto Mag handgun, and Kent won the Townsend Whelen award for writing by the Gun Digest for an article he penned for that publication, describing his efforts in this area.

Before that, Kent held the distinction of sending more guns back to the Smith & Wesson factory for rebuild than any other customer in the company's history, and was the Indiana distributor for Lakeville Arms (Jim Harvey) products at the age of twelve while he was in the eighth grade.

Kent is survived by his sister Cindy, his four children, Lane, Jill, Chris, and Molly, stepdaughters Candy and Sherry, and ex-wives Kathy, Shirley, and Mary Lou.

We are diminished.


Yes we are.
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Old 02-01-2012, 10:32 AM   #2
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I met him a few times, he could sure make the Class III goodies ROAR! Rest in Peace Mr. Lomont.
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Old 02-01-2012, 11:50 AM   #3
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Gents,

Did business with Kent when I was a class III dealer. Good man...and an honest class III.

We are, indeed, diminished.

Wes
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Old 02-01-2012, 06:22 PM   #4
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I had the years incorrect for the his Gun Digest Auto Mag articles. It was 1977 and 78. I have been re-reading them, and am impressed all over again at the depth he dug into them, or for that matter, anything.

He was a whiz on AutoMags, but nothing compared to machine guns. As a friend and I were discussing, he had a depth of knowledge that is lost and I don't know if it's possible to replace even if someone wanted to try. He knew the finest details of the most obscure MGs you could find in any book, and he got it by shooting them to pieces. My friend estimated Kent had fired more rounds than anyone on the planet, and while it was an offhand remark, he is probably correct. There might be someone testing ammo in a plant or guns at a facility like Aberdeen that could come close, but I don't know about that. He shot regularly, in incredibly high volumes, and kept it up for over 50 years. And he learned things while doing it. There was always a purpose; he didn't just burn powder and make noise.

I understand there will be a memorial at Knob Creek, but I also heard this spring's Knob Creek shoot has already been cancelled (bridge replacement completion doubtful).
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