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Old 01-02-2011, 05:05 PM   #1
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My New Reloading/Gunsmithing Bench!

Pics... Click 'em!















Don't the curtains just outline it beautifully? Hehehehe



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Old 01-03-2011, 06:13 AM   #2
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Very nice!
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Old 01-11-2011, 10:26 AM   #3
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Josh, Thanks for showing that to us. I wish you the best of luck and pleasure in using it. The photos remind me of a quote I read in one of the many writings of Ralph A. Bagnold, 1930s and WW II British officer, desert explorer and adventurer in Model T and Model A Fords, and the author of the classic book on the physics of windblown sand. I don't remember whom Bagnold was quoting: I ran across it while browsing in a library. But the quote is something like: "There is no such thing as a gentleman's library without a workbench". Best wishes, Yeruham
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:18 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yeruham
Ralph A. Bagnold, 1930s and WW II British officer, desert explorer and adventurer in Model T and Model A Fords, and the author of the classic book on the physics of windblown sand.


Late OC of the Long Range Desert Group?
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Old 01-12-2011, 03:24 PM   #5
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Oberstlt, Exactly. Also called by the British in those days a "private army" because they had pretty much carte blanche and could be trusted to do the right thing. I have learned the most from his Libyan Sands, Travel in a Dead World. I've almost finished reading his The Physics of Blown Sand and Desert Dunes. But much of it is over my head because of the weak maths in my liberal arts education. Best wishes, Yeruham

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Old 01-12-2011, 04:30 PM   #6
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I think Popski had the Private Army. Their hat badge was a globe as I recall. The PPA was an interesting outfit as well.



Don't worry Yeruham, I took the same math course four times to get my liberal arts done. Didn't so much as pass as wore them out.
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Old 01-12-2011, 07:38 PM   #7
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Nice bench. Mine gets used as a reloading/gunsmithing combination bench too. Of course it always seems I need to reload when I have a barrel vise in place, or fiddle with a scope when the bullet sizer/lubricator is mounted.



Your pics remind me of something I'd really like to have: Duplicates of all my manuals. They are best kept at the bench, but I do more reading of them while inside. Whenever I'm inside and want to look something up, I have to go out in the cold garage and get the book I want. A set for inside and out would be a luxury, but an appreciated luxury.





I've wanted to read Libyan Sands for a while. I think it's out of print now, as prices have jumped. Hopefully, it will someday be on Kindle.

There are a couple of books that have come out in the last few years about Aussies and Kiwis in the the LRDG that are supposed to be really good. Maybe someday I'll get to those. So many books, so little time. One on Frederick Russel Burnham and another on the Rhodesian war are next up for me.
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Old 01-13-2011, 07:03 AM   #8
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I forget the name of the book but Stephen Pressfield's last novel was about the LRDG. Excellent work. Then again, sort of like Stephen Hunter, pretty much everything he does is good.



My loading bench is attached to the garage (known as the bunker) wall. The good news is that it creates no mess in the living quarters. The bad news is that during cold weather it is fairly unavailable. I have components read to go for some 308 WIN and it is just too cold to do it!



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Old 01-13-2011, 11:36 AM   #9
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My best reloading benches and stock making benches were made inside spare clothes closets with accordion doors on them. First I ran 2 x 4 ledger strips around the back and sides of the closet, then cut a piece of good quality 3/4" plywood into two like slabs and glued and screwed them together into a 1 1/2" thick bench top that matched the interior dimensions of the closet. I usually made my benches at least belt-buckle high and incorporated a centerline brace from the back wall to the underside of the bench top. I then ran a piece of moulding down the front of it for a finished look. I covered the bench top with inexpensive indoor/outdoor carpeting held down with two way tape at strategic locations.



I placed the front edge of the bench top back just far enough for the doors to close and made sure my press was recessed into the bench top far enough to allow same. I left the handle out of the press when not using it as this allows the press to be placed further forward. I just screwed in the handle when I needed to.



I always placed the press to the right of center far enough to allow the maximum use of the bench for other loading and stockmaking operations, and bolted it there with a piece of 1/8" steel plate between the press and bench, and another piece beneath the bench directly underneath the press. I then sat the press on the top piece of steel plate and bolted it in with large washers/lock washers and nuts on the underside of the bench in contact with the other piece of steel plate.



Then it was an easy matter to hang 1 x 4 ledgers around the walls to support shelving, locate your electrical outlet, and so on. I ran electricity in from wherever I could pick it up and wired a switched double (or bigger) fluorescent light unit as long as the closet could accomodate down the ceiling left to right, and continued the wire on to a new outlet, or vice versa.



My seat was a simple stool which I stashed on its side beneath the bench, on the floor, when I wasn't using it or wanted to close up for the evening. My rifle vise went down there too, along with a wastebasket and other tools and supplies. When the doorbell rang and I was charging cases, it was an easy matter to ease the accordion doors closed on the operation and leave without fear of it being disturbed. Likewise, when I got too tired to clean up after myself, I did the same thing. It was a wonderful system that I used in two different residences for a total of 16 years and I can heartily recommend it if you find yourself with an extra closet. The two closets I used were typical "tract house" closets about eight feet wide and roughly thirty inches or so deep. It doesen't have to be a big closet in order to work well.



The only drawback I ever discovered with these systems was the disturbance of the scale beam by air blown in through heat and cooling registers when charging cases. I just closed off the registers and that usually took care of the problem.



Us rednecks never give up, do we?



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Old 01-15-2011, 10:23 AM   #10
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One thing I forgot to mention is that these closets were in carpeted bedrooms, so I also kept a throw rug stashed under the bench and spread it out when I worked so as not to wear out or stain the carpet.



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